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Ignition Coin - The Next Generation of Store of Value on the Blockchain

At the core of the Ignition Coin ecosystem and development process is a focus on maintaining and improving the *store of value* functionality of the network.
[link]

RaiBlocks

Join the conversation on a dynamic cryptocurrency that is advancing blockchain technology.
[link]

VeriCoin

The home for the most innovative cryptocurrency, VeriCoin and Verium VeriCoin: Proof-of-Stake-Time Protocol. PoST Verified. Verium: Proof-of-Work-Time Protocol. PoWT Verified. CPU Mine-able (GPU and ASIC Resistant)
[link]

A thought experiment: If you found a winning lottery ticket valued at $1,000,000 USD, would you buy bitcoin? How much, and why?

The basic premise of this question is "If you had all of your physical needs met, would you sacrifice some of that to own bitcoin?"
Ideal answers are in the form:
Yes/No (If yes) 0% - 100% of $1,000,000 Brief explanation 
submitted by secret_bitcoin_login to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

WIN 1 BITCOIN - THE MOST VALUABLE CRYPTOCURRENCY ($10000 Value) (12/27/2017) {WW}

WIN 1 BITCOIN - THE MOST VALUABLE CRYPTOCURRENCY ($10000 Value) (12/27/2017) {WW} submitted by denkil to giveaways [link] [comments]

Technical: Taproot: Why Activate?

This is a follow-up on https://old.reddit.com/Bitcoin/comments/hqzp14/technical_the_path_to_taproot_activation/
Taproot! Everybody wants it!! But... you might ask yourself: sure, everybody else wants it, but why would I, sovereign Bitcoin HODLer, want it? Surely I can be better than everybody else because I swapped XXX fiat for Bitcoin unlike all those nocoiners?
And it is important for you to know the reasons why you, o sovereign Bitcoiner, would want Taproot activated. After all, your nodes (or the nodes your wallets use, which if you are SPV, you hopefully can pester to your wallet vendoimplementor about) need to be upgraded in order for Taproot activation to actually succeed instead of becoming a hot sticky mess.
First, let's consider some principles of Bitcoin.
I'm sure most of us here would agree that the above are very important principles of Bitcoin and that these are principles we would not be willing to remove. If anything, we would want those principles strengthened (especially the last one, financial privacy, which current Bitcoin is only sporadically strong with: you can get privacy, it just requires effort to do so).
So, how does Taproot affect those principles?

Taproot and Your /Coins

Most HODLers probably HODL their coins in singlesig addresses. Sadly, switching to Taproot would do very little for you (it gives a mild discount at spend time, at the cost of a mild increase in fee at receive time (paid by whoever sends to you, so if it's a self-send from a P2PKH or bech32 address, you pay for this); mostly a wash).
(technical details: a Taproot output is 1 version byte + 32 byte public key, while a P2WPKH (bech32 singlesig) output is 1 version byte + 20 byte public key hash, so the Taproot output spends 12 bytes more; spending from a P2WPKH requires revealing a 32-byte public key later, which is not needed with Taproot, and Taproot signatures are about 9 bytes smaller than P2WPKH signatures, but the 32 bytes plus 9 bytes is divided by 4 because of the witness discount, so it saves about 11 bytes; mostly a wash, it increases blockweight by about 1 virtual byte, 4 weight for each Taproot-output-input, compared to P2WPKH-output-input).
However, as your HODLings grow in value, you might start wondering if multisignature k-of-n setups might be better for the security of your savings. And it is in multisignature that Taproot starts to give benefits!
Taproot switches to using Schnorr signing scheme. Schnorr makes key aggregation -- constructing a single public key from multiple public keys -- almost as trivial as adding numbers together. "Almost" because it involves some fairly advanced math instead of simple boring number adding, but hey when was the last time you added up your grocery list prices by hand huh?
With current P2SH and P2WSH multisignature schemes, if you have a 2-of-3 setup, then to spend, you need to provide two different signatures from two different public keys. With Taproot, you can create, using special moon math, a single public key that represents your 2-of-3 setup. Then you just put two of your devices together, have them communicate to each other (this can be done airgapped, in theory, by sending QR codes: the software to do this is not even being built yet, but that's because Taproot hasn't activated yet!), and they will make a single signature to authorize any spend from your 2-of-3 address. That's 73 witness bytes -- 18.25 virtual bytes -- of signatures you save!
And if you decide that your current setup with 1-of-1 P2PKH / P2WPKH addresses is just fine as-is: well, that's the whole point of a softfork: backwards-compatibility; you can receive from Taproot users just fine, and once your wallet is updated for Taproot-sending support, you can send to Taproot users just fine as well!
(P2WPKH and P2WSH -- SegWit v0 -- addresses start with bc1q; Taproot -- SegWit v1 --- addresses start with bc1p, in case you wanted to know the difference; in bech32 q is 0, p is 1)
Now how about HODLers who keep all, or some, of their coins on custodial services? Well, any custodial service worth its salt would be doing at least 2-of-3, or probably something even bigger, like 11-of-15. So your custodial service, if it switched to using Taproot internally, could save a lot more (imagine an 11-of-15 getting reduced from 11 signatures to just 1!), which --- we can only hope! --- should translate to lower fees and better customer service from your custodial service!
So I think we can say, very accurately, that the Bitcoin principle --- that YOU are in control of your money --- can only be helped by Taproot (if you are doing multisignature), and, because P2PKH and P2WPKH remain validly-usable addresses in a Taproot future, will not be harmed by Taproot. Its benefit to this principle might be small (it mostly only benefits multisignature users) but since it has no drawbacks with this (i.e. singlesig users can continue to use P2WPKH and P2PKH still) this is still a nice, tidy win!
(even singlesig users get a minor benefit, in that multisig users will now reduce their blockchain space footprint, so that fees can be kept low for everybody; so for example even if you have your single set of private keys engraved on titanium plates sealed in an airtight box stored in a safe buried in a desert protected by angry nomads riding giant sandworms because you're the frickin' Kwisatz Haderach, you still gain some benefit from Taproot)
And here's the important part: if P2PKH/P2WPKH is working perfectly fine with you and you decide to never use Taproot yourself, Taproot will not affect you detrimentally. First do no harm!

Taproot and Your Contracts

No one is an island, no one lives alone. Give and you shall receive. You know: by trading with other people, you can gain expertise in some obscure little necessity of the world (and greatly increase your productivity in that little field), and then trade the products of your expertise for necessities other people have created, all of you thereby gaining gains from trade.
So, contracts, which are basically enforceable agreements that facilitate trading with people who you do not personally know and therefore might not trust.
Let's start with a simple example. You want to buy some gewgaws from somebody. But you don't know them personally. The seller wants the money, you want their gewgaws, but because of the lack of trust (you don't know them!! what if they're scammers??) neither of you can benefit from gains from trade.
However, suppose both of you know of some entity that both of you trust. That entity can act as a trusted escrow. The entity provides you security: this enables the trade, allowing both of you to get gains from trade.
In Bitcoin-land, this can be implemented as a 2-of-3 multisignature. The three signatories in the multisgnature would be you, the gewgaw seller, and the escrow. You put the payment for the gewgaws into this 2-of-3 multisignature address.
Now, suppose it turns out neither of you are scammers (whaaaat!). You receive the gewgaws just fine and you're willing to pay up for them. Then you and the gewgaw seller just sign a transaction --- you and the gewgaw seller are 2, sufficient to trigger the 2-of-3 --- that spends from the 2-of-3 address to a singlesig the gewgaw seller wants (or whatever address the gewgaw seller wants).
But suppose some problem arises. The seller gave you gawgews instead of gewgaws. Or you decided to keep the gewgaws but not sign the transaction to release the funds to the seller. In either case, the escrow is notified, and if it can sign with you to refund the funds back to you (if the seller was a scammer) or it can sign with the seller to forward the funds to the seller (if you were a scammer).
Taproot helps with this: like mentioned above, it allows multisignature setups to produce only one signature, reducing blockchain space usage, and thus making contracts --- which require multiple people, by definition, you don't make contracts with yourself --- is made cheaper (which we hope enables more of these setups to happen for more gains from trade for everyone, also, moon and lambos).
(technology-wise, it's easier to make an n-of-n than a k-of-n, making a k-of-n would require a complex setup involving a long ritual with many communication rounds between the n participants, but an n-of-n can be done trivially with some moon math. You can, however, make what is effectively a 2-of-3 by using a three-branch SCRIPT: either 2-of-2 of you and seller, OR 2-of-2 of you and escrow, OR 2-of-2 of escrow and seller. Fortunately, Taproot adds a facility to embed a SCRIPT inside a public key, so you can have a 2-of-2 Taprooted address (between you and seller) with a SCRIPT branch that can instead be spent with 2-of-2 (you + escrow) OR 2-of-2 (seller + escrow), which implements the three-branched SCRIPT above. If neither of you are scammers (hopefully the common case) then you both sign using your keys and never have to contact the escrow, since you are just using the escrow public key without coordinating with them (because n-of-n is trivial but k-of-n requires setup with communication rounds), so in the "best case" where both of you are honest traders, you also get a privacy boost, in that the escrow never learns you have been trading on gewgaws, I mean ewww, gawgews are much better than gewgaws and therefore I now judge you for being a gewgaw enthusiast, you filthy gewgawer).

Taproot and Your Contracts, Part 2: Cryptographic Boogaloo

Now suppose you want to buy some data instead of things. For example, maybe you have some closed-source software in trial mode installed, and want to pay the developer for the full version. You want to pay for an activation code.
This can be done, today, by using an HTLC. The developer tells you the hash of the activation code. You pay to an HTLC, paying out to the developer if it reveals the preimage (the activation code), or refunding the money back to you after a pre-agreed timeout. If the developer claims the funds, it has to reveal the preimage, which is the activation code, and you can now activate your software. If the developer does not claim the funds by the timeout, you get refunded.
And you can do that, with HTLCs, today.
Of course, HTLCs do have problems:
Fortunately, with Schnorr (which is enabled by Taproot), we can now use the Scriptless Script constuction by Andrew Poelstra. This Scriptless Script allows a new construction, the PTLC or Pointlocked Timelocked Contract. Instead of hashes and preimages, just replace "hash" with "point" and "preimage" with "scalar".
Or as you might know them: "point" is really "public key" and "scalar" is really a "private key". What a PTLC does is that, given a particular public key, the pointlocked branch can be spent only if the spender reveals the private key of the given public key to you.
Another nice thing with PTLCs is that they are deniable. What appears onchain is just a single 2-of-2 signature between you and the developemanufacturer. It's like a magic trick. This signature has no special watermarks, it's a perfectly normal signature (the pledge). However, from this signature, plus some datta given to you by the developemanufacturer (known as the adaptor signature) you can derive the private key of a particular public key you both agree on (the turn). Anyone scraping the blockchain will just see signatures that look just like every other signature, and as long as nobody manages to hack you and get a copy of the adaptor signature or the private key, they cannot get the private key behind the public key (point) that the pointlocked branch needs (the prestige).
(Just to be clear, the public key you are getting the private key from, is distinct from the public key that the developemanufacturer will use for its funds. The activation key is different from the developer's onchain Bitcoin key, and it is the activation key whose private key you will be learning, not the developer's/manufacturer's onchain Bitcoin key).
So:
Taproot lets PTLCs exist onchain because they enable Schnorr, which is a requirement of PTLCs / Scriptless Script.
(technology-wise, take note that Scriptless Script works only for the "pointlocked" branch of the contract; you need normal Script, or a pre-signed nLockTimed transaction, for the "timelocked" branch. Since Taproot can embed a script, you can have the Taproot pubkey be a 2-of-2 to implement the Scriptless Script "pointlocked" branch, then have a hidden script that lets you recover the funds with an OP_CHECKLOCKTIMEVERIFY after the timeout if the seller does not claim the funds.)

Quantum Quibbles!

Now if you were really paying attention, you might have noticed this parenthetical:
(technical details: a Taproot output is 1 version byte + 32 byte public key, while a P2WPKH (bech32 singlesig) output is 1 version byte + 20 byte public key hash...)
So wait, Taproot uses raw 32-byte public keys, and not public key hashes? Isn't that more quantum-vulnerable??
Well, in theory yes. In practice, they probably are not.
It's not that hashes can be broken by quantum computes --- they're still not. Instead, you have to look at how you spend from a P2WPKH/P2PKH pay-to-public-key-hash.
When you spend from a P2PKH / P2WPKH, you have to reveal the public key. Then Bitcoin hashes it and checks if this matches with the public-key-hash, and only then actually validates the signature for that public key.
So an unconfirmed transaction, floating in the mempools of nodes globally, will show, in plain sight for everyone to see, your public key.
(public keys should be public, that's why they're called public keys, LOL)
And if quantum computers are fast enough to be of concern, then they are probably fast enough that, in the several minutes to several hours from broadcast to confirmation, they have already cracked the public key that is openly broadcast with your transaction. The owner of the quantum computer can now replace your unconfirmed transaction with one that pays the funds to itself. Even if you did not opt-in RBF, miners are still incentivized to support RBF on RBF-disabled transactions.
So the extra hash is not as significant a protection against quantum computers as you might think. Instead, the extra hash-and-compare needed is just extra validation effort.
Further, if you have ever, in the past, spent from the address, then there exists already a transaction indelibly stored on the blockchain, openly displaying the public key from which quantum computers can derive the private key. So those are still vulnerable to quantum computers.
For the most part, the cryptographers behind Taproot (and Bitcoin Core) are of the opinion that quantum computers capable of cracking Bitcoin pubkeys are unlikely to appear within a decade or two.
So:
For now, the homomorphic and linear properties of elliptic curve cryptography provide a lot of benefits --- particularly the linearity property is what enables Scriptless Script and simple multisignature (i.e. multisignatures that are just 1 signature onchain). So it might be a good idea to take advantage of them now while we are still fairly safe against quantum computers. It seems likely that quantum-safe signature schemes are nonlinear (thus losing these advantages).

Summary

I Wanna Be The Taprooter!

So, do you want to help activate Taproot? Here's what you, mister sovereign Bitcoin HODLer, can do!

But I Hate Taproot!!

That's fine!

Discussions About Taproot Activation

submitted by almkglor to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

$1,000 invested in Top 10 Cryptos of 2019 now worth $1,260 (UP +26%)

$1,000 invested in Top 10 Cryptos of 2019 now worth $1,260 (UP +26%)
EXPERIMENT - Tracking Top 10 Cryptos of 2019 - Month Eighteen - UP +26%
See the full blog post with all the tables here.
tl;dr - Tether (as it's designed to do) holds its ground, all others finish the month in negative territory. Tron finishes June in second place, down -2%. BSV loses nearly 25% of value in June. Overall, since January 2019, BTC in lead, ETH takes over second place, XRP still worst performing. The 2019 Top 10 is up +26% almost equal to the the gains of the S&P 500 over the same time period (+24%).

Month Eighteen – UP 26%

Not a great month for the 2019 Top Ten
After a strong April and a mixed May, June was bloody for the 2019 Top Ten Cryptos. Stablecoin Tether was the only crypto to hold its ground, as it was designed to do.

Question of the month:

According to a June article citing unnamed sources, which two FinTech companies are planning to allow their users to buy and sell crypto directly?

A) Paypal and Venmo B) Square and Cashapp C) Robinhood and Revolut D) Sofi and Coinbase
Scroll down for the answer.

Ranking and June Winners and Losers

XRP and Stellar slipped one place each in the rankings in June, now at #4 and #14 respectively. EOS fell two spots to #11 and joins Stellar and Tron as the only three cryptos to have dropped out of the 2019 Top Ten since January 1st, 2019. They have been replaced by Binance Coin, Cardano, and newcomer CRO.
Tether was the only crypto to move up in rank in June.
Not a good sign when Tether is the only crypto to move up.
Not a good sign when Tether enters the Top 3.
June WinnersTether. Second comes Tron, which basically held its ground at -2%.
June LosersBSV lost -23% of its value in June making it the worst performing of the 2019 Top Ten portfolio. EOS had a rough month as well, down -17%, dropping two spots in the rankings, and falling out of the Top Ten.
If you’re keeping score, here is tally of which coins have the most monthly wins and loses during the first 18 months of the 2019 Top Ten Experiment: Tether is still in the lead with six monthly victories followed by BSV in second place with three. BSV also holds the most monthly losses, finishing last in seven out of eighteen months. The only crypto not to win a month so far? XRP. (In fairness, XRP has also not lost any month yet).

Overall update – BTC in lead, ETH takes over second place, XRP still worst performing

BTC is out front for the second straight month and ETH has taken over second place from BSV. Ahead until April, BSV has simply not keep up with the pack over the last two months. Bitcoin is up +144% since January 2019. The initial $100 investment in BTC is currently worth $249.
Eighteen months in, 50% of the 2019 Top Ten cryptos are in the green since the beginning of the experiment. The other five cryptos are either flat or in negative territory, including last place XRP (down -50% since January 2019).

Total Market Cap for the entire cryptocurrency sector:

The crypto market as a whole is down about $20B in June, but still up +106% since January 2019.

Bitcoin dominance:

BitDom finally wobbled in June, but not by much – it’s been in a very familiar zone for months now, indicating a lack of excitement (or at least a low risk tolerance) for altcoins. Taking a wider view, the Bitcoin Dominance range since the beginning of the experiment in January 2019 has ranged between 50%-70%.

Overall return on investment since January 1st, 2019:

The 2019 Top Ten Portfolio lost almost $175 in June. After the initial $1000 investment, the 2019 group of Top Ten cryptos is worth $1,259. That’s up about +26%.
Here’s a look at the ROI over the life of the first 18 months of the 2019 Top Ten Index Fund experiment, month by month:
18 months of ROI, mostly green
Unlike the completely red table you’ll see in the 2018 Top Ten Experiment, the 2019 crypto table is almost all green. The first month was the lowest point (-9%), and the highest point (+114%) was May 2019.
How does the 2019 Top Ten Index Fund Portfolio compare to the parallel projects?
Taking the three portfolios together, here’s the bottom bottom bottom line:
After a $3000 investment in the 2018, 2019, and 2020 Top Ten Cryptocurrencies, the combined portfolios are worth $2,710‬.
That’s down about -10% for the three combined portfolios. Last month that figure was +4%. Better than a few months ago (aka the zombie apocalypse) where it was down -24%, but not yet back at January (+13%) or February (+6%) levels.
Here’s a new table to help visualize the progress of the combined portfolios:
ROI of all three combined portfolios - not exactly inspiring
How do crypto returns compare to traditional markets?

Comparison to S&P 500:

Good thing I’m tracking the S&P 500 as part of my experiment to have a comparison point with other popular investments options. Even with unemployment, protests, and COVID, the US market continued to rebound in June. It’s now up +24% in the last 18 months.
The initial $1k investment I put into crypto would be worth $1,240 had it been redirected to the S&P 500 in January 2019.
As a reminder (or just scroll up) the 2019 Top Ten portfolio is returning +26% over last 18 months, just about equal to the return of the S&P 500 over the same time period. Just last month the ROI of the 2019 Top Ten crypto portfolio was nearly double the S&P 500 since January 1st, 2019.
But what if I took the same world’s-slowest-dollar-cost-averaging/$1,000-per-year-in-January approach with the S&P 500? It would yield the following:
  • $1000 investment in S&P 500 on January 1st, 2018: +$170
  • $1000 investment in S&P 500 on January 1st, 2019: +$240
  • $1000 investment in S&P 500 on January 1st, 2020: -$40
Taken together, here’s the bottom bottom bottom line for a similar approach with the S&P:
After three $1,000 investments into an S&P 500 index fund in January 2018, 2019, and 2020, my portfolio would be worth $3,370.
That $3,370 is up over+12% since January 2018, compared to the $2,710 value (-10%) of the combined Top Ten Crypto Experiment Portfolios. Here’s another new table that compares the ROI of the combined crypto portfolios to a hypothetical similar approach with the S&P 500:
We see in June the largest difference in favor of the S&P since the beginning of 2020: a 22% gap. Compare that February, when there was only a 1% difference in ROI.

Implications/Observations:

Since January 2019, the crypto market as a whole has gained +106% compared to the 2019 Top Ten Crypto Portfolio which has gained +26%. That’s an 80% gap.
At this point in the 2019 Experiment, an investor would have done much better picking different cryptos or investing in the entire market instead of focusing only on the 2019 Top Ten. Over the course of the first 18 months of tracking the 2019 Top Ten, there have been instances this was a winning strategy, but the cases have been few and far between.
The 2018 Top Ten portfolio, on the other hand, has never outperformed the overall market, at least not in the first thirty months of that Experiment.
And for the most recent 2020 Top Ten group? The opposite had been true: the 2020 Top Ten had easily outperformed the overall market 100% of the time…up until the last two months.

Conclusion:

As the world continues to battle COVID, traditional markets seem to be recovering. Will crypto make a significant move in the second half of 2020?
Final word: Stay safe and take care of each other.
Thanks for reading and for supporting the experiment. I hope you’ve found it helpful. I continue to be committed to seeing this process through and reporting along the way. Feel free to reach out with any questions and stay tuned for progress reports. Keep an eye out for the original 2018 Top Ten Crypto Index Fund Experiment and the recently launched 2020 Top Ten Experiment.

And the Answer is…

A) Paypal and Venmo
According to a Coindesk report in June, three sources familiar with the matter say that Paypal and Paypal-owned Venmo are planning to allow their users to buy and sell crypto. Paypal has declined to comment.
submitted by Joe-M-4 to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

I bought $1k of the Top Ten Cryptos on January 1st, 2018. Result? Down -79%

I bought $1k of the Top Ten Cryptos on January 1st, 2018. Result? Down -79%

EXPERIMENT - Tracking Top 10 Cryptos of 2018 - Month Twenty-Nine - Down -79%
See the full blog post with all the tables here.
tl;dr - Cardano wins May, BTC still way ahead, ETH solidly in second place, NEM (anyone still remember NEM?) still in basement. Markets going up despite world on fire. 3 x $1k investments in crypto in 2018, 2019, 2020 are down -7% compared to the US stock market. Word.

Month Twenty-Nine – Down 79%

While not quite as strong as April, May was undeniably a strong month overall, especially with the last minute push that saw Bitcoin climb over the $10k mark. Although BTC (and the market overall) has fallen in the last few days while I’ve been compiling these updates, we saw almost every 2018 Top Ten crypto end the month of May higher than where it started.

Question of the month:

The Bitcoin halving took place on May 11th, 2020 at 7:23 PM UTC. Since the first Bitcoin block was generated in 2009, how many halving events have occurred?
A) One B) Three C) Five D) None of the above
Scroll down for the answer.

Ranking and May Winners and Losers

Half of our 2018 Top Ten group were on the move in May. Cardano made the most upward progress, climbing two positions to #11. IOTA picked up rose one spot in the standings to #24 as well. On the other side, NEM keeps slipping, losing three spots to #30. Dash and Stellar also dropped two positions each in May.
The overall drop out rate remains at the 50% mark (meaning half of the cryptos that started 2018 in the Top Ten have dropped out). NEM, Dash, IOTA, Cardano, and Stellar have been replaced by EOS, Binance Coin, Tezos, Tether, and BSV.
May Winners – Massive month for ADA, up an impressive +62%. That’s about what Cardano gained last month, so, yeah, Cardano is having a great spring. IOTA also had a solid month, up +28%.
May LosersXRP lost about -4% making it the worst performing of this group in May.
How has your favorite crypto fared over the first 29 months of the 2018 Top Ten Crypto Index Fund Experiment? Most monthly wins (7): Bitcoin. Most monthly losses (5) is a now tie between Stellar and NEM. All cryptos have at least one monthly win and Bitcoin stands alone as the only crypto that hasn’t lost a month (although it came close in January 2020 when it gained “only” +31%).

Overall update – BTC still way ahead, ETH firmly in second place, NEM worst performing.

Bitcoin made up more ground in May, now down -23% since January 2018. The last time we saw this price level to end a month was August 2019. The initial $100 investment is now worth about $77.
BTC is still well ahead of the field and Ethereum is firmly in second place. This may feel like a foregone conclusion at this point, but for context, long time 2018 Top Ten Experiment followers will note that this has not always been the case. Just a little over a year ago for example, BTC was second place behind Stellar.
NEM (down -95%) is in last place. That initial $100 investment in NEM? Now worth $4.74.

Total Market Cap for the entire cryptocurrency sector:

The overall crypto market added about $35B in May 2020, back near August 2019 levels. This is down about half from January 2018 when the market was worth roughly $575B.

Bitcoin dominance:

Another flat month for Bitcoin dominance, which hasn’t moved at all in the last three months.
For context, the range since the beginning of the experiment in January 2018 has been wide: a high of 70% BitDom in September 2019 and a low of 33% BitDom in February 2018.

Overall return on investment since January 1st, 2018:

The 2018 Top Ten Portfolio gained about $20 bucks in May 2020, back near where it was at the end of February. If I cashed out today, my $1000 initial investment would return about $205, down -79% from January 2018.
Here’s the ROI over the life of the experiment, month by month:
The streak of nine consecutive months down at least -80% was finally broken in May. Just barely (at -79%), but hey, I’ll take it. July 2019 was the last time the 2018 Top Ten finished a month in the negative seventies. What about the negative sixties? That level hasn’t been seen in about two years.
Painful stuff. What about the follow on Experiments? Let’s see:
So overall? Taking the three portfolios together, here’s the bottom bottom bottom line:
After a $3000 investment in the 2018, 2019, and 2020 Top Ten Cryptocurrencies, my portfolios are worth $3,104‬.
That’s up about +3.5% for the combined portfolios. Better than a few months ago (aka the zombie apocalypse) where it was down -24%, but not yet back at January (+13%) or February (+6%) levels.

Comparison to S&P 500:

I’m also tracking the S&P 500 as part of the experiment to have a comparison point with other popular investments options. The stock market (as measured by the S&P) continued to recover in May. It’s pretty amazing with all that’s going on in the world, but the market is already back up where it was in February 2020. The initial $1k investment into crypto on New Year’s Day 2018 would have gained about $140 had it been redirected to the S&P.
This is where it gets interesting. Taking the same drop-$1,000-per-year-on-January-1st approach with the S&P 500 that I’ve been documenting through the Top Ten Crypto Experiments would yield the following:
  • $1000 investment in S&P 500 on January 1st, 2018: +$140
  • $1000 investment in S&P 500 on January 1st, 2019: +$220
  • $1000 investment in S&P 500 on January 1st, 2020: -$50
Taken together, here’s the bottom bottom bottom line for a similar approach with the S&P:
After three $1,000 investments into an S&P 500 index fund in January 2018, 2019, and 2020, my portfolio would be worth $3,310.
That is up over+10% since January 2018, compared to the $3,104 value (+3.5%) of the combined Top Ten Crypto Experiment Portfolios.
That’s about a 7% difference in favor of the stock market. Last month, there was only a 3% difference. The month before, the gap was 13%.

Implications/Observations:

No news here: the 2018 Experiment’s focus of solely holding the Top Ten Cryptos has not and has never been a winning approach when compared to the overall market. The total market cap is down -51% from January 2018 compared to the -79% for the cryptos that began 2018 in the Top Ten. This of course implies that I would have done a bit better if I’d picked different cryptos – but much better than if I’d put all my eggs in NEM‘s -95% basket, for example. To reiterate, at no point in this experiment has this investment strategy been successful: the initial 2018 Top Ten have under-performed each of the twenty-nine months compared to the market overall.
In the following two Top Ten experiments, it’s a slightly different story. There are a few examples of this approach outperforming the overall market in the parallel 2019 Top Ten Crypto Experiment. For the most recent 2020 group, this approach had outperformed the overall market 100% of the time…until this month.

Conclusion:

The Bitcoin halving turned out to be a non event and markets continue to steadily rise despite riots in the US and a global pandemic. We’re almost half way through a very strange year. As the world changes, what will crypto’s place be in the new normal?
Final word: Please take care of yourselves, your families, and your communities. Be excellent to each other.
Thanks for reading and for supporting the experiment. I hope you’ve found it helpful. I continue to be committed to seeing this process through and reporting along the way. Feel free to reach out with any questions and stay tuned for progress reports. Keep an eye out for my parallel projects where I repeat the experiment twice, purchasing another $1000 ($100 each) of two new sets of Top Ten cryptos as of January 1st, 2019 then again on January 1st, 2020.

And the Answer is…

B) Three
Bitcoin’s third halving event took place May 2020.
submitted by Joe-M-4 to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Crypto brainpower index

TL;DR: Nano wins, 5.79x more brainpower than the next best, Monero.
Following a recent post about Nano marketing, I think it's worth highlighting that amongst the demographic that matters: developers, Nano is marketing itself. The data below highlights the ratio of marketcap to Github repos for the top 13 coins and Nano. A popular thesis is that opensource always wins; e.g. Linux kernal. Therefore, this is a very rough metric to guage how under / over-valued coins are based on how much opensource brainpower they are attracting in the form of Github repos. I recently attempted a small project with Ethereum but gave up in a day because of gas fees and slow transactions. On the other hand, my Nano project is a joy to work on. In terms of methodology, all the Github searches are for 'Bitcoin', 'Ethereum', 'Ripple' (XRP fared even worse), etc PLUS 'cryptocurrency' to allow for the fact that 'Nano' is not a unique identifier for NANO. The lower the ratio number, the better.
Finally, this index could be massively improved upon so if anyone is looking for a project, start building!

submitted by libertant to nanocurrency [link] [comments]

[ Bitcoin ] Technical: Taproot: Why Activate?

Topic originally posted in Bitcoin by almkglor [link]
This is a follow-up on https://old.reddit.com/Bitcoin/comments/hqzp14/technical_the_path_to_taproot_activation/
Taproot! Everybody wants it!! But... you might ask yourself: sure, everybody else wants it, but why would I, sovereign Bitcoin HODLer, want it? Surely I can be better than everybody else because I swapped XXX fiat for Bitcoin unlike all those nocoiners?
And it is important for you to know the reasons why you, o sovereign Bitcoiner, would want Taproot activated. After all, your nodes (or the nodes your wallets use, which if you are SPV, you hopefully can pester to your wallet vendoimplementor about) need to be upgraded in order for Taproot activation to actually succeed instead of becoming a hot sticky mess.
First, let's consider some principles of Bitcoin.
I'm sure most of us here would agree that the above are very important principles of Bitcoin and that these are principles we would not be willing to remove. If anything, we would want those principles strengthened (especially the last one, financial privacy, which current Bitcoin is only sporadically strong with: you can get privacy, it just requires effort to do so).
So, how does Taproot affect those principles?

Taproot and Your /Coins

Most HODLers probably HODL their coins in singlesig addresses. Sadly, switching to Taproot would do very little for you (it gives a mild discount at spend time, at the cost of a mild increase in fee at receive time (paid by whoever sends to you, so if it's a self-send from a P2PKH or bech32 address, you pay for this); mostly a wash).
(technical details: a Taproot output is 1 version byte + 32 byte public key, while a P2WPKH (bech32 singlesig) output is 1 version byte + 20 byte public key hash, so the Taproot output spends 12 bytes more; spending from a P2WPKH requires revealing a 32-byte public key later, which is not needed with Taproot, and Taproot signatures are about 9 bytes smaller than P2WPKH signatures, but the 32 bytes plus 9 bytes is divided by 4 because of the witness discount, so it saves about 11 bytes; mostly a wash, it increases blockweight by about 1 virtual byte, 4 weight for each Taproot-output-input, compared to P2WPKH-output-input).
However, as your HODLings grow in value, you might start wondering if multisignature k-of-n setups might be better for the security of your savings. And it is in multisignature that Taproot starts to give benefits!
Taproot switches to using Schnorr signing scheme. Schnorr makes key aggregation -- constructing a single public key from multiple public keys -- almost as trivial as adding numbers together. "Almost" because it involves some fairly advanced math instead of simple boring number adding, but hey when was the last time you added up your grocery list prices by hand huh?
With current P2SH and P2WSH multisignature schemes, if you have a 2-of-3 setup, then to spend, you need to provide two different signatures from two different public keys. With Taproot, you can create, using special moon math, a single public key that represents your 2-of-3 setup. Then you just put two of your devices together, have them communicate to each other (this can be done airgapped, in theory, by sending QR codes: the software to do this is not even being built yet, but that's because Taproot hasn't activated yet!), and they will make a single signature to authorize any spend from your 2-of-3 address. That's 73 witness bytes -- 18.25 virtual bytes -- of signatures you save!
And if you decide that your current setup with 1-of-1 P2PKH / P2WPKH addresses is just fine as-is: well, that's the whole point of a softfork: backwards-compatibility; you can receive from Taproot users just fine, and once your wallet is updated for Taproot-sending support, you can send to Taproot users just fine as well!
(P2WPKH and P2WSH -- SegWit v0 -- addresses start with bc1q; Taproot -- SegWit v1 --- addresses start with bc1p, in case you wanted to know the difference; in bech32 q is 0, p is 1)
Now how about HODLers who keep all, or some, of their coins on custodial services? Well, any custodial service worth its salt would be doing at least 2-of-3, or probably something even bigger, like 11-of-15. So your custodial service, if it switched to using Taproot internally, could save a lot more (imagine an 11-of-15 getting reduced from 11 signatures to just 1!), which --- we can only hope! --- should translate to lower fees and better customer service from your custodial service!
So I think we can say, very accurately, that the Bitcoin principle --- that YOU are in control of your money --- can only be helped by Taproot (if you are doing multisignature), and, because P2PKH and P2WPKH remain validly-usable addresses in a Taproot future, will not be harmed by Taproot. Its benefit to this principle might be small (it mostly only benefits multisignature users) but since it has no drawbacks with this (i.e. singlesig users can continue to use P2WPKH and P2PKH still) this is still a nice, tidy win!
(even singlesig users get a minor benefit, in that multisig users will now reduce their blockchain space footprint, so that fees can be kept low for everybody; so for example even if you have your single set of private keys engraved on titanium plates sealed in an airtight box stored in a safe buried in a desert protected by angry nomads riding giant sandworms because you're the frickin' Kwisatz Haderach, you still gain some benefit from Taproot)
And here's the important part: if P2PKH/P2WPKH is working perfectly fine with you and you decide to never use Taproot yourself, Taproot will not affect you detrimentally. First do no harm!

Taproot and Your Contracts

No one is an island, no one lives alone. Give and you shall receive. You know: by trading with other people, you can gain expertise in some obscure little necessity of the world (and greatly increase your productivity in that little field), and then trade the products of your expertise for necessities other people have created, all of you thereby gaining gains from trade.
So, contracts, which are basically enforceable agreements that facilitate trading with people who you do not personally know and therefore might not trust.
Let's start with a simple example. You want to buy some gewgaws from somebody. But you don't know them personally. The seller wants the money, you want their gewgaws, but because of the lack of trust (you don't know them!! what if they're scammers??) neither of you can benefit from gains from trade.
However, suppose both of you know of some entity that both of you trust. That entity can act as a trusted escrow. The entity provides you security: this enables the trade, allowing both of you to get gains from trade.
In Bitcoin-land, this can be implemented as a 2-of-3 multisignature. The three signatories in the multisgnature would be you, the gewgaw seller, and the escrow. You put the payment for the gewgaws into this 2-of-3 multisignature address.
Now, suppose it turns out neither of you are scammers (whaaaat!). You receive the gewgaws just fine and you're willing to pay up for them. Then you and the gewgaw seller just sign a transaction --- you and the gewgaw seller are 2, sufficient to trigger the 2-of-3 --- that spends from the 2-of-3 address to a singlesig the gewgaw seller wants (or whatever address the gewgaw seller wants).
But suppose some problem arises. The seller gave you gawgews instead of gewgaws. Or you decided to keep the gewgaws but not sign the transaction to release the funds to the seller. In either case, the escrow is notified, and if it can sign with you to refund the funds back to you (if the seller was a scammer) or it can sign with the seller to forward the funds to the seller (if you were a scammer).
Taproot helps with this: like mentioned above, it allows multisignature setups to produce only one signature, reducing blockchain space usage, and thus making contracts --- which require multiple people, by definition, you don't make contracts with yourself --- is made cheaper (which we hope enables more of these setups to happen for more gains from trade for everyone, also, moon and lambos).
(technology-wise, it's easier to make an n-of-n than a k-of-n, making a k-of-n would require a complex setup involving a long ritual with many communication rounds between the n participants, but an n-of-n can be done trivially with some moon math. You can, however, make what is effectively a 2-of-3 by using a three-branch SCRIPT: either 2-of-2 of you and seller, OR 2-of-2 of you and escrow, OR 2-of-2 of escrow and seller. Fortunately, Taproot adds a facility to embed a SCRIPT inside a public key, so you can have a 2-of-2 Taprooted address (between you and seller) with a SCRIPT branch that can instead be spent with 2-of-2 (you + escrow) OR 2-of-2 (seller + escrow), which implements the three-branched SCRIPT above. If neither of you are scammers (hopefully the common case) then you both sign using your keys and never have to contact the escrow, since you are just using the escrow public key without coordinating with them (because n-of-n is trivial but k-of-n requires setup with communication rounds), so in the "best case" where both of you are honest traders, you also get a privacy boost, in that the escrow never learns you have been trading on gewgaws, I mean ewww, gawgews are much better than gewgaws and therefore I now judge you for being a gewgaw enthusiast, you filthy gewgawer).

Taproot and Your Contracts, Part 2: Cryptographic Boogaloo

Now suppose you want to buy some data instead of things. For example, maybe you have some closed-source software in trial mode installed, and want to pay the developer for the full version. You want to pay for an activation code.
This can be done, today, by using an HTLC. The developer tells you the hash of the activation code. You pay to an HTLC, paying out to the developer if it reveals the preimage (the activation code), or refunding the money back to you after a pre-agreed timeout. If the developer claims the funds, it has to reveal the preimage, which is the activation code, and you can now activate your software. If the developer does not claim the funds by the timeout, you get refunded.
And you can do that, with HTLCs, today.
Of course, HTLCs do have problems:
Fortunately, with Schnorr (which is enabled by Taproot), we can now use the Scriptless Script constuction by Andrew Poelstra. This Scriptless Script allows a new construction, the PTLC or Pointlocked Timelocked Contract. Instead of hashes and preimages, just replace "hash" with "point" and "preimage" with "scalar".
Or as you might know them: "point" is really "public key" and "scalar" is really a "private key". What a PTLC does is that, given a particular public key, the pointlocked branch can be spent only if the spender reveals the private key of the given private key to you.
Another nice thing with PTLCs is that they are deniable. What appears onchain is just a single 2-of-2 signature between you and the developemanufacturer. It's like a magic trick. This signature has no special watermarks, it's a perfectly normal signature (the pledge). However, from this signature, plus some datta given to you by the developemanufacturer (known as the adaptor signature) you can derive the private key of a particular public key you both agree on (the turn). Anyone scraping the blockchain will just see signatures that look just like every other signature, and as long as nobody manages to hack you and get a copy of the adaptor signature or the private key, they cannot get the private key behind the public key (point) that the pointlocked branch needs (the prestige).
(Just to be clear, the public key you are getting the private key from, is distinct from the public key that the developemanufacturer will use for its funds. The activation key is different from the developer's onchain Bitcoin key, and it is the activation key whose private key you will be learning, not the developer's/manufacturer's onchain Bitcoin key).
So:
Taproot lets PTLCs exist onchain because they enable Schnorr, which is a requirement of PTLCs / Scriptless Script.
(technology-wise, take note that Scriptless Script works only for the "pointlocked" branch of the contract; you need normal Script, or a pre-signed nLockTimed transaction, for the "timelocked" branch. Since Taproot can embed a script, you can have the Taproot pubkey be a 2-of-2 to implement the Scriptless Script "pointlocked" branch, then have a hidden script that lets you recover the funds with an OP_CHECKLOCKTIMEVERIFY after the timeout if the seller does not claim the funds.)

Quantum Quibbles!

Now if you were really paying attention, you might have noticed this parenthetical:
(technical details: a Taproot output is 1 version byte + 32 byte public key, while a P2WPKH (bech32 singlesig) output is 1 version byte + 20 byte public key hash...)
So wait, Taproot uses raw 32-byte public keys, and not public key hashes? Isn't that more quantum-vulnerable??
Well, in theory yes. In practice, they probably are not.
It's not that hashes can be broken by quantum computes --- they're still not. Instead, you have to look at how you spend from a P2WPKH/P2PKH pay-to-public-key-hash.
When you spend from a P2PKH / P2WPKH, you have to reveal the public key. Then Bitcoin hashes it and checks if this matches with the public-key-hash, and only then actually validates the signature for that public key.
So an unconfirmed transaction, floating in the mempools of nodes globally, will show, in plain sight for everyone to see, your public key.
(public keys should be public, that's why they're called public keys, LOL)
And if quantum computers are fast enough to be of concern, then they are probably fast enough that, in the several minutes to several hours from broadcast to confirmation, they have already cracked the public key that is openly broadcast with your transaction. The owner of the quantum computer can now replace your unconfirmed transaction with one that pays the funds to itself. Even if you did not opt-in RBF, miners are still incentivized to support RBF on RBF-disabled transactions.
So the extra hash is not as significant a protection against quantum computers as you might think. Instead, the extra hash-and-compare needed is just extra validation effort.
Further, if you have ever, in the past, spent from the address, then there exists already a transaction indelibly stored on the blockchain, openly displaying the public key from which quantum computers can derive the private key. So those are still vulnerable to quantum computers.
For the most part, the cryptographers behind Taproot (and Bitcoin Core) are of the opinion that quantum computers capable of cracking Bitcoin pubkeys are unlikely to appear within a decade or two.
So:
For now, the homomorphic and linear properties of elliptic curve cryptography provide a lot of benefits --- particularly the linearity property is what enables Scriptless Script and simple multisignature (i.e. multisignatures that are just 1 signature onchain). So it might be a good idea to take advantage of them now while we are still fairly safe against quantum computers. It seems likely that quantum-safe signature schemes are nonlinear (thus losing these advantages).

Summary

I Wanna Be The Taprooter!

So, do you want to help activate Taproot? Here's what you, mister sovereign Bitcoin HODLer, can do!

But I Hate Taproot!!

That's fine!

Discussions About Taproot Activation

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submitted by anticensor_bot to u/anticensor_bot [link] [comments]

How to Get Money Out of Poker sites Using Cryptocurrency. A guide.

I wanted to provide a definitive guide for those trying to find the quickest and cheapest way to get their winnings/initial deposit out of various poker sites through the means of cryptocurrency.
This guide does not recommend cryptocurrency trading and even if you follow all of these steps, there is still a risk for currency fluctuations. It took a lot for me to figure this out and I wanted to pay it forward and help those in the future learn this valuable information. I take no responsibility for the accuracy of this guide, but I will say this is the method I now use. Various state laws can make each step more difficult. However, this method is tailored to the strictest of laws that affect Cryptocurrency issued by New York state.
Ok, so you got some money and want to get it out of a poker or gambling site. Checks are offered, but who has time for that 4 week turnaround on what could be a bad check. So you have decided to get into Cryptocurrency. Here is how the money gets to your bank.
Poker site -> Wallet -> Exchange -> Bank.
1st Step - Getting the money out of your poker account. So you request a withdrawal in cryptocurrency. But which currency? There is Bitcoin (the original), Bitcoin Cash (the fork), Ethereum (New Cool Kid), Tether or Dai (stablecoin) Bitcoin SV, Litecoin, etc.... There are benefits to each currency. Bitcoin is the original and most well known. It is the most traded by far with a market cap (total value) more than all other cryptocurrencies combined. There is also a well established group of people holding bitcoin as an investment to the future. However, Bitcoin also has the most fees and slowest transaction times depending on the fee you pay. Personally I use Ether and Bitcoin Cash. They are based on new versions of blockchain, transfer quickest between wallets and exchanges, and have lower transfer fees. I have not used Dai and Tether, but I will go into stablecoin later.
Step 2 - The Wallet. The wallet is where your money from the pokersite will go. I want to make it very clear. You do not want your money to go from the pokersite to the exchange. The exchange can and will learn it is from a pokersite which can cause you a lot of problems later on. In particular, running a foul of U.S laws and regulations on gaming. So you want the money to go to your wallet. I recommend either Exodus or if you just want Bitcon, Blockstream Green. Exodus though is my go to. You can use it online or through your mobile device. It will automatically scan deposit and withdraw codes for you (this is extremely important so you don't mess up where your money goes). It also has a nice sleek interface and accepts most cryptocurrencies. One thing to point out, Exodus was designed for bitcoin miners at one point who wanted their money out quickly. So, when using bitcoin, it sends and receives your money out as quick as possible using higher fees. You may be concerned by this. However, now you got crypto, lets get it to your exchange.
Step 3 - The Exchange. So there are many exchanges, where you convert your crypto to other crypto or even cash. The three most popular in the US are Cash App, Coinbase, and Gemini. Cash App is easy, if you can set it up. If there is an issue with Cash App, good luck. Their customer support is non-existent (this actually led me to use Coinbase). Basically, you send the money from your wallet to CashApp and then sell the bitcoin in the app. About 20 minutes later the money is in the app and can be sent to your bank. There are various fees, I believe 1.5% to sell the coin, 1.5% to ACH to your account or 1.75% for instant credit to your bank account. I personally use Coinbase Pro. It costs me .5% to sell the crypto. I could then ACH it to my bank account which takes about 5 days. Instead I added another step.
You can link your Coinbase account to your Paypal account. So, when I have cashed out at the cheapest rate at Coinbase Pro, I instant transfer the money to Coinbase and then instant transfer it to paypal. There are no fees for this and there are no fees for Coinbase Pro. Coinbase Pro allows you to do things CashApp or regular Coinbase does not. For example, I held my Bitcoin Cash which came in at 219 and put an order to sell at 230. When Bitcoin Cash hit 230, it sold and I made a couple extra percent return on my money. It was a risk, but wanted to play with a limit order. When the money got to my Paypal account, I instant transferred it to my debit card for 1% fee. I could have ACHed it for free and had the money in a day or two, but I decided to take the quick cash.
Overall, the quickest I have seen cryptocurrency with withdrawals is under 24 hours with Pai Wang Luo Network (Bovada/Ignition) and 3 days for WPN. Once I have received my crypto, the quickest I have been able to hit my account is 1.5 hours.
Now here is the big risk from Cryptocurrency: Currency fluctuation. I have no idea why crypto goes down or up, or why some cryptos go one way while others will go another. General rule, if Bitcoin is up or down, the others are as well. Example: Past 24 Hours (7/5/2020 - 7/6/2020), Bitcoin up 3.1%, Ether 6%, Bitcoin Cash 8.36% Tether -.1%, Dai .68%. Dai and Tether were created to avoid currency fluctuations by tieing themselves to an asset. Tether is "tethered" to the USD. So try one of the those for less risk maybe. But please note, while you have crypto in your wallet and exchange, and it goes up or down, that's your money going up or down.
I hope this helps anyone trying to figure out how to use cryptocurrencies. GL
submitted by UndecidedMN to poker [link] [comments]

Low life

Im 33 and an addict for more than 12 years. Ive been trying to quit multiple times. Ive read alan carrs book 5 times. I had therapy. I take medication for depression. But every time i relapse again. I gambled away all my bitcoins and altcoins also. If i see the value now of this, it also makes me sick. Half a million dollars. Im devestated, ashamed. I life with my parents. Heavy in debt. The reason i always relapse again is hoping for a big win to improve the situation. But every win i give back. Yesterday i went from 100 to 1000. And then i said oke lets do a 100 dollar bonusbuy. This is the last one. But i just kept clicking and clickibg while i was screaming in myself to stop. I am already banned in casinos online and irl. But i played under friends their name or i always find new casinos.. or bitcoincasinos. They just let me create new accounts. I write letters to myself. I put up postnotes. Memories. My background is antigambling. But when the urge is there... nothing stops me. And the time to fix it goes so slow... i cant wait years... and meanwhile seeing the cryptos go higher and higher is killing me. Every day i wake up in stress. And then thinking what i should have done. How can 20 bonusses be so bad.
submitted by icarus2a to problemgambling [link] [comments]

What I like most about Cardano

Hey guys and gals,
I posted the following in a discussion on cryptocurrency earlier today, and though that I'd share here as well. I fixed one item (I had the epoch length wrong), and some grammatical errors.
Please share your thoughts or what you find exciting about Cardano in the comments, and if you are new here and just starting to fill your ADA bags, I really hope you find this useful!
What I love most about Cardano
  1. Slow and steady wins the race - The Cardano protocol is build on peer-reviewed academic research. This takes an excruciating amount of time to get things done, however what you end up with is a better product. They think first, then try and prove it wrong, and only if it is proven correct do they build. All of the code used for Cardano is high-assurance code, and no other cryptocurrency project is doing this to my knowledge. I truly believe this is why so many people on this sub hated on Cardano so much in 2018 & 2019. There were crazy high hopes for this project, but people wanted delivery right away and price increases. That's just not how things are done at Cardano, and I personally love it.
  2. Staking - Just for the testnet, Cardano had over 1000 stakepools. If this is true for the mainnet, Cardano will be the most decentralized cryptocurrency on Earth. Another project that I love is Tezos. However roughly 25% of all Tezos bakers are owned by the foundation, and there is nowhere near the same transparency when selecting a baker as there is when choosing a stakepool for your ADA. All the performance statistics, fees, and other info for stakepools is made available on the Cardano wallet, and if your current stakepool stops performing you can easily change to a different one. My rate of return on my ADA was over 10%, and rewards are issued back every day. On the mainnet, which launches in about 30 days, rewards from staking will be issued every 5 days, right to your wallet. This means you can compound your gains and stake more as you grow. Also, when you stake your ADA, they never leave your wallet or get locked up in any way. I am very much looking forward to staking through my ledger hardware wallet.
  3. Decentralization - Having over 1000 independent stakepools will make Cardano the most decentralized financial ecosystem in existence. And I predict that we end up with well over this number.
  4. Scalability - Full transparency: I own and love both Ethereum and Bitcoin. But my biggest problem with both is that they must bottleneck transactions when the volume is up. I remember a few years back when I couldn't use ETH for days because a bunch of people were feverishly trying to get rich buying and selling digital images of cartoon cats. Neither Ethereum nor Bitcoin can handle anything close to a billion users in their current forms. And I know that Ethereum is building Eth 2.0, and I'm excited to see what they come up with, however Cardano was built with this problem in mind from the get-go. Unlike our first and second generation systems, as more users transact on Cardano, it actually moves faster, not slower.
If you are really interested, the developers of Cardano have had their research on "sharding" not only peer reviewed, but published. Through sharding, Cardano could theoretically support over 1,000,000 transactions per second.
  1. Growth potential based on previous price - As a former stock investor, I am quite used to using this measurement in a bear market, for good or for ill. Whether it applies or has value here it to be determined, however for me it cannot be overlooked. Simply by measuring the current price vs the all time high price shows you that ADA must increase 16X just to get back to it's former high price ($1.31/.08). Ethereum on the other hand must only 6.5X to it's all time high ($1500/230), and both Bitcoin and Tezos must only 2X.
To be fair, this is not a proven method of measuring the value of cryptocurrency, but it is one that I am using nonetheless.
Hope this gets some good conversation going!
Edit:
  1. Most generous community - Two silvers and an ELI5?! Thank you guys!
submitted by GlowingViral to cardano [link] [comments]

Should there really be a Scav cooldown timer if you aren't even doing a "Run Through"??? That's a super easy fix which would make the life of anyone new, casual, or with a bad PC 100 times better. Plus more constructive thoughts and criticisms from a very passionate life long gamer.

Quick background, I've been a hardcore FPS player most of my life (I'm pretty old now for competitive gamers but...). I've also been a hardcore RTS player, MMO player, played a lot of DOTA 2, I even played some dang card games (Not Hearthstone)... basically I just love good games. But at the end of the day FPS was always my favorite, although I might be better statistically with RTS?
I'm brand new to Tarkov, this is my first legit wipe (I played a few hours during the last wipe but I was lagging so much I quit, literally every gun fight I was getting spikes and was just dead with a frame lock stutter... but then I realized I need to try to overclock my CPU from 4.0 to 4.3 GHZ and suddenly the game became "playable"). I think it's note worthy that Tarkov is one of only 2 games in my experience where I just feel my computer isn't good enough to play correctly (the other one is PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds which I just didn't like that game too much honestly even compared to the old H1Z1).
ANYWAYS... I love this game. I've programmed games in Unity by myself, one of them was really complex but my artist quit and has now worked for big companies like ArenaNet... so when I heard that Tarkov was made in Unity, honestly I was impressed. Personally working solo or damned near it, I didn't think it was possible to make a game like this in Unity...
And in some ways I'm right... the game doesn't run very smoothly on my PC even with the lowest graphics settings. Youtube videos of Tarkov look WAYYYYYY better and smoother than my actual game... normally you lose quite a bit of quality with recording but I can tell my PC isn't handling the game correctly... You also need an SSD drive to play with friends which is reasonable but just another example why this game is difficult to excel in not just because of your skill and knowledge/intelligence of the game... but also the computer requirements are VERY steep.

I have a few points I want to make that I think could greatly improve the game:

1) Why is there a timer for playing Scav even if you play it like a normal raid and you don't receive the "Run Through" status?
I understand they made a timer so you can't just infinitely spawn Scavs and run to extract every time you get something good... but if you are playing legit??? If you are playing Scav as if it was your PMC (especially applies to newer players)? If you are going out of your way to make sure you don't have a run through???
I just think they may want to reconsider this design point for people that aren't abusing Scav, there is currently no way to play the game and financially progress without feeling like you aren't good enough if you aren't a god gamer (dozens of reasons players might think they are trash right now).
I've been progressing pretty well for my first wipe, just hit level 30 (haven't played a lot of days including missing around 7-10 days for start of wipe...). I have a bitcoin farm with 10/10 slots filled, I have millions of Roubles...
I can make money pretty steadily, I even have a friend who's REALLY good at the game, he got rid of literally 50 Graphics Cards about a week into the wipe because he was bored playing alone and was about to quit... then I'm like "hey lets play? I overclocked my CPU i think it's sorta playable now"... I do play a lot of solo though, but I have a very experienced friend who can help me with all my questions, specific tasks, and just teaching me the game quickly in general.
My point is that I think I'm doing pretty good for my first wipe but I still feel the game is too stressful at the moment. It's a little too much stress compared to fun, but it's close.

2) I was gonna log on today because I need to do the 8 kills near the Factory Office Area. I realized that this task unlocks SO MUCH STUFF... and I should of done it long ago.
I was about to log on but, I was planning all day on it but... then I was like... hmm I don't want to go through what happened in my last PMC factory quest. I was a brand new player and my PC doesn't run the game that well... killing a bunch of super kitted guys with a pistol like 10 days into wipe??? It's humiliating...
No joke my Survival Rate might be about +20% higher if it was not for that ONE Factory PMC quest. I'm not even exaggerating... I blew millions on total trash loadouts like PACA, derpy helm, and a Grach. I must of died at least 20 times just to complete that 1 quest (keep in mind I was a Global Elite in CSGO, and over 200 H1Z1 battle Royale wins which means I was the sole survivor of about 110 people over 200 times. I had really talented friends help me at times but you get the point, I was surprised when I wasn't solo winning Battle Royales...).
I'm not trying to brag about my previous FPS experiences. My point is that even if someone like me can have such a bad experience on a Factory PMC quest... a lot of players will just quit the game at that point.
I haven't quit the game, I still love it overall... but tonight I guess you could say I have "Ranked Anxiety". It's not even Ranked but I am actually scared to take the humiliation of lets say even 10 deaths for the 8 PMC Kills in the Office Area... For me 10 deaths would be humiliating... I already have 1 death and no kills yet...
.8 k/d isn't even that bad for a small sample size, but imagine how casual FPS players must feel trying to go in vs all these fully kitted Chads when their kit is like 1/4th the price for tasks like this? Imagine if their PC is sorta old too... so not only are they maybe new to the game, they have a trash kit compared to enemies, but their PC also doesn't run the game as well as their opponents which in a game like this even missing 1 shot can be the difference between life or death.

3) I know everyone is complaining about Mosin lately... for new players especially but...
IMO, the Stash Size is the biggest problem for a new player.
I can 100% understand it from a business perspective to make the stash extremely expensive, it truly is a pay to win feature imo.
The reason I can say I understand the business perspective is because I bought EoD! It seemed like the only option if you like the game, it was otherwise impossible for someone like me who values efficiency and to be able to speedily do things...
I got to the point where I had to make a decision. Do I spend 3.5 million Roubles on a Stash Upgrade knowing that if I EVER buy real life game upgrades... I just wasted 3.5 milllion??? Or do I spend a LOT of REAL MONEY to make the game reasonable...
I probably wouldn't even bring up the stash if the game didn't have all these other problems I'm mentioning.
The reason I bring it up is to prove to you how much I like the game, I don't even have a good PC atm and I still bought EoD!
But if they want the game to be fair and balanced the starting stash size is completely unacceptable. Especially for new players... they are going to value their gear so much because they are so weak financially, they don't even have access to the Flea Market... but still they have to waste so much time trying to Tetris stuff, they can't fully get the gear from Scav runs ETC...
I think the starting stash size is 100% the biggest problem in the game for new or casual players, I don't expect it to be fixed because of the real world money but... if they really waned to make the game as good as it can be they'd improve that for sure.

Conclusion:
I just feel that currently even if you really love the game, if you are a new or casual player it's simply too scary to play comfortably. The anxiety of failure is so extreme that even I (who used to be a top FPS player) might not log on any given day because I just don't wanna feel bad.
I think this is especially true if you don't have a top of the line PC. Even just 1 death where you feel maybe if you had a good pc you might of won that fight... that hurts a lot for the fun factor... I sort of want to buy a new graphics card for starters but knowing Unity in a game like this... I might need a new CPU too it's just rough.
For all the reasons I described above, and for many more I didn't mention specifically and I'm sure others have... I think they should at least reconsider the Scav cooldown design so that players can at least log on and just play Scav continually without feeling like they aren't good enough to play this game (this is assuming they don't do "Run Throughs" to prevent Scav abuse).
If players could at least run Scav 24/7 and just get comfortable with the game, I think this game would be a lot more accessible and enjoyable for the vast majority.
submitted by Tokadub to EscapefromTarkov [link] [comments]

Contributing to litecoin development

Dear Community,
I am a tech professional with "good" programming knowledge. I believe I have sound logic and good understanding of data structures and functions. I have security programming background as well.
With the constant noise on lack of development for LTC, it is high time we try to build parallel use cases for LTC much like BTC.. I am ready to spend my weekends and post working hours of my job to spend my time energy & effort in developing something so cool.
I don't know where to begin though. My initial thought process is to clone the litecoin repo and start understanding the Blockchain code so that I may contribute further developments and gain a foundational understanding of it. Any resources or guidance on this will help. I am sure it's a big learning curve but it's one I'm ready to take on.
I am also thinking to noting my progress & learnings along the way for as anyone who wants to start from basics and learn their way up. Happy to know your thoughts and comments.
. .
Update (9 July 2020) : So I've been scouring the internet , available documentation and shared links. And I am struggling.. So far I've managed some small wins.
I've successfully cloned the litecoin repository in a private repo and managed to learn a little more about litecoin from a codebase standpoint. I found an article that gives an overall understanding of codebase (I believe maybe v0.17). Also , I've come to the conclusion looking at the repo that it mainly in c++ which is not something I've coded in for a while. I've also realized that LTC code in v0.18 is cognitively difficult to grasp and my task has become a tad harder. So I'm planning to focus my efforts on v0.8 (original code) because of two reasons - strength my foundations and leverage more accessible documentation for bitcoin code to draw any parallels. I will keep you guys posted on the updates.
Link: https://medium.com/@philippsandnelitecoin-satisfying-codebase-with-room-for-improvements-4af4d5f21cda#:~:text=The%20Litecoin%20codebase%20shows%20a,category%20focuses%20on%20code%20issues
. .
Update (19 July 2020) - After doing my research and reading literally every opiniated article & knowledge base , I've come to the conclusion that spending energy on understanding the LTC codebase may not be serving a really significant purpose. Instead due to the similarities with BTC (literally silver to gold) , I'm currently going through a book called ' Programming Bitcoin by Jimmy Song".. I've gone through the contents and it seems highly relevant to understand to build apps on top of LTC and give way to use cases like Wrapped LTC on contact networks like ETH , EOS and TRX.. (wink wink).. I am assuming that this knowledge is transferable to LTC programming. Also there is a lot of hype on the op code CTV which is apparently paving way to mainstream contract building on value chains.. Will let you know as I progress. I've also been setting up the Mustard Wallet for LTC coin join and also reading up on fungibility concepts like Coin Shuffle and MimbleWimble with the upcoming upgrade.
. .
submitted by 0ccumZRaz0r to litecoin [link] [comments]

Repeated Experiment: I bought $1k of Top10 Cryptos on 01/01/2019. Result? UP +43%

Repeated Experiment: I bought $1k of Top10 Cryptos on 01/01/2019. Result? UP +43%

EXPERIMENT - Tracking 2019 Top Ten Cryptocurrencies – Month Seventeen - UP 43%

Full blog post with all the tables here.

tl;dr - This is the 17th monthly update on the 2019 Top Ten Experiment. Ethereum up the most in May, plus got a shout out from J.K. Rowling, so it obviously won the month. Overall, BTC in first place since January 2019, BSV in second place. Half of the 2019 Top Ten Portfolio is up at least +50%. XRP is worst performing. Total $3k (3 x $1k) investments the 2018, 2019, and 2020 Top Ten are up +3.5%, but similar approach with US stocks market would have yielded +10%.

The Experiment:

Instead of hypothetically tracking cryptos, I made an actual $1000 investment, $100 in each of the Top 10 cryptocurrencies by market cap on the 1st of January 2018. The result? The 2018 Top Ten portfolio ended 2018 down 85%, my $1000 worth only $150. I then repeated the experiment on the 1st of January 2019 with the new 2019 Top Ten cryptos, then again in 2020.
Think of the Top Ten Experiments as a lazy man’s Index Fund (no weighting or rebalancing), less technical, but hopefully still a proxy for the market as a whole – or at the very least an interesting snapshot of the 2018, 2019, and 2020 crypto space. I am trying to keep this project simple and accessible for beginners and those looking to get into crypto but maybe not quite ready to jump in yet. I try not to take sides or analyze, but rather attempt to report in a detached manner letting the numbers speak for themselves.
This is not investing advice – as a matter of fact, the vast majority of the reports will show that the Top Ten approach under performs other strategies. This experiment is designed to be documentary in nature, describing a specific period in cryptocurrency history.

The Rules:

Buy $100 of each the Top 10 cryptocurrencies on January 1st, 2018, 2019, and 2020. Hold only. No selling. No trading. Report monthly.

Month Seventeen – UP 43%

Unlike April’s all green month, May was more mixed. That said, the gains outweighed the losses this month in the 2019 Top Ten Portfolio.

Question of the month:

In May, Reddit launched two Ethereum-based tokens on the Cryptocurrency and FortNiteBR subreddits. What are the Cryptocurrency token called?
A) Moons
B) Bricks
C) Satoshis
D) Cryptos
Scroll down for the answer.

Ranking and March Winners and Losers

Besides Stellar (down two spots to #13) and Tron (down one from #16 to #17) every other crypto was locked in place.
Speaking of Stellar and Tron, they are still the only two cryptos to have dropped out of the 2019 Top Ten since January 1st, 2019. They have been replaced by Binance Coin and Tezos.
May WinnersEthereum ended the month up +16% and got a shout out from J.K. Rowling, so it obviously won May. BTC came in a close second this month, up +14%.
May Losers – A tight battle for the basement this month with BSV (down -3.9%) edging out XRP (down -3.7%) for the bottom spot.
For nerds those keeping score, here is tally of which coins have the most monthly wins and loses during the first seventeen months of the 2019 Top Ten Experiment: Tether is still in the lead with five monthly victories followed by BSV in second place with three. BSV also holds the most monthly losses, finishing last in six out of seventeen months.

Overall update – BTC increases lead over second place BSV, XRP still worst performing

Ahead until just last month, BSV lost a lot of ground to BTC in May. Bitcoin is now up +168% since January 2019 compared to BSV‘s +116% gain. That initial $100 investment in BTC? Now worth $273.
As was the case last month, 50% of the 2019 Top Ten cryptos are up at least +50% since the beginning of the experiment.
At the other end, XRP continues to struggle, now down -41% since January 2019.

Total Market Cap for the entire cryptocurrency sector:

The overall crypto market added about $35B in May, and is now near August 2019 levels. It is up +123% since January 2019.

Bitcoin dominance:

BitDom was steady again in May. This marks the third straight month it’s been stuck at around 65% For context, the range since the beginning of the experiment in January 2019 has been between 50%-70%.

Overall return on investment since January 1st, 2019:

The 2019 Top Ten Portfolio gained about $65 in May. After the initial $1000 investment, the 2019 group of cryptos is worth $1,431, up about +43%.
Here’s a look at the ROI over the life of the first seventeen months of the experiment, month by month:
Almost completely green for the 2019 Top Ten, a welcome change from the all red table you’ll see in the 2018 experiment. As you can see, every month except the first month ends in positive territory. At the lowest point, the 2019 Top Ten portfolio was down -9%, at the highest point, up +114% (May 2019).
How does the 2019 Top Ten Experiment compare to the parallel projects?
Taking the three portfolios together, here’s the bottom bottom bottom line:
After a $3000 investment in the 2018, 2019, and 2020 Top Ten Cryptocurrencies, my portfolios are worth $3,104‬.
That’s up about +3.5% for the combined portfolios. Better than a few months ago (aka the zombie apocalypse) where it was down -24%, but not yet back at January (+13%) or February (+6%) levels.
How does this compare to traditional markets?

How does the 2019 Top Ten portfolio compare US stock market?

Excellent question, I’m glad you asked. And you’re in luck, I’m also tracking the S&P 500 as part of my experiment to have a comparison point with other popular investments options. Despite the fact that the world seemed to be on fire, May 2020 saw the continued rebound of the stock market. It’s now up +22% since the start of the 2019 Experiment.
As a reminder (or just scroll up) the 2019 Top Ten portfolio is returning +43% over the same time period, which is about double the S&P 500.
The initial $1k investment I put into crypto would be worth $1,220 had it been redirected to the S&P 500 in January 2019.
But what if I took the same world’s-slowest-dollar-cost-averaging/$1,000-per-year-in-January approach with the S&P 500? It would yield the following:
  • $1000 investment in S&P 500 on January 1st, 2018: +$140
  • $1000 investment in S&P 500 on January 1st, 2019: +$220
  • $1000 investment in S&P 500 on January 1st, 2020: -$50
Taken together, here’s the bottom bottom bottom line for a similar approach with the S&P:
After three $1,000 investments into an S&P 500 index fund in January 2018, 2019, and 2020, my portfolio would be worth $3,310.
That $3,310 is up over+10% since January 2018, compared to the $3,104 value (+3.5%) of the combined Top Ten Crypto Experiment Portfolios.
That’s about a 7% difference in favor of the stock market. Last month, there was only a 3% difference, the month before, the gap was 13% (all in favor of the stock market).

Implications/Observations:

The difference between the 2019 Top Ten crypto group and the overall crypto market is stark. Since January 2019, the overall market has gained +123% compared to the 2019 Top Ten crypto group which has gained +43%. This is an absolutely massive 80% gap. A +43% return is solid compared to the stock market, but it also implies that an investor would have done much better picking different cryptos or investing in the entire market instead of focusing only on the Top Ten. There are a few examples of this approach outperforming the overall market in this 2019 Top Ten Crypto Experiment, but the cases are few and far between.
The 2018 Top Ten portfolio, on the other hand, has never outperformed the overall market, at least not in the first twenty-nine months of that Experiment.
For the most recent 2020 Top Ten group, the opposite had been true: the 2020 Top Ten had easily outperformed the overall market 100% of the time…until this month.

Conclusion:

The BTC halving event came and went in May and crypto markets shrugged. As the world continues to change because of COVID-19, what will be crypto’s place when we finally emerge on the other side?
Final word: Please take care of yourselves, your families, and your communities. Stay safe out there.
Thanks for reading and for supporting the experiment. I hope you’ve found it helpful. I continue to be committed to seeing this process through and reporting along the way. Feel free to reach out with any questions and stay tuned for progress reports. Keep an eye out for the original 2018 Top Ten Crypto Index Fund Experiment and the recently launched 2020 Top Ten Experiment.

And the Answer is…

A) Moons
According CryptoCurrency, Moons represent ownership in the subreddit, “tokens on the Ethereum blockchain controlled entirely by you, and they can be freely transferred, tipped, and spent in CryptoCurrency*.*” Check out this post for more details.
submitted by Joe-M-4 to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

6 Extraordinary Salespeople.

Good news, your request has been approved! One of the Salespeople is willing have you as a customer! Alas, due to union rules, only one of the Salespeople can work with each customer, so you’ll have to choose one. Once you’ve chosen, you can contact them anytime- just ask and they’ll step from the air wherever you are.
The Salespeople will haggle, but they’re pretty good at it- you’re unlikely to get more then a small decrease in cost, and will probably be haggled up. They won't be your friend, they won’t help you in any way other then making a sale, and will avoid answering any questions about what they are or where they came from (except the Knowledge Broker, but you’ll have to pay through the nose for that one). They are also much more powerful then they seem, and have access to abilities far beyond those obviously visible- any attempt to attack, rob, scam or coerce them will fail at best.
Anyway! Here they are! Choose one to work with!
  1. The Death Merchant: She’s young and thin. 20 at most, with the nervous, overly friendly look of someone trying to make their first sale. In a bright suit and bright smile, she explains. She makes people die. She’s not a hitman, you understand. She just makes people die. Give her a name and description and they’ll die the next day. Default is a stroke but if you want to pay a bit more you can choose a preferred method of death. Can’t be traced back to you, can’t be protected against, can't be survived. No she’s not heard of “Death Note”, she’s never really been much of a reader. What does she want in exchange? Time. Specifically, yours. Kill off some randomer with a stroke, you’ll only age a few months. But the more “important” someone is (that is, the bigger knock-on effects their death will have) and the more elaborate the cause of death, the more time is lost. Killing a world leader is about a decade. She notices you don’t have a lot of years, so she’ll inform you that her branch is looking for freelancers. That is, if you personally kill someone, she can give you some time for it! Same rules. Kill some nobody on the street and gain three months, kill a world leader and you’ll become a decade younger. She grins that bright smile as you notice the grass she stood on has withered away. Kill anyone you want and live forever! What a bargain, huh? Shake her hand and let’s get started!
  2. The Body Crafter: He’s in his 50s. Dressed casually, blunt and straightforward. He’s not going to give you his sales pitch. He’s just going to tell you what he makes. Bodies. He looks over yours and sighs. You got one of those evolution-designed ones, didn’t you? They seem cheap but they’ll give out on you. Here, he’ll fix it. He can make you a new body. All the way up from simply cosmetically different to superhuman. He’s very good at your job and honestly, given the junker you’re in now, he’ll only bill you raw materials. Compassionate reasons, you see. All you have to do bring him some flesh. A minor change- skin or eye or hair color, a bit smaller or taller? That’ll be maybe a small animal. A dog or pig for something like healing a chronic disease or a true sex change. Something like a cow or horse for making you younger, or improving your strength or speed or intelligence or something a reasonable amount. If you want peak human abilities, or an ability an animal has? That’ll be a person. Maybe 2, if it’s a really rare trait. You want something superhuman? That’ll be a lot of people. Depends on how powerful you want to be. Try and get some kind of kryptonian bullshit and you’ll need to depopulate a large city. He won’t lie to you: these animals and people are gonna die. Horribly. He’ll want them restrained when you’re giving them to him- he’s already doing you a favor, he’s not going to beat them into submission for you. Just give him the design of your new body and he’ll tell you what he needs.
  3. The Knowledge Broker: Sometimes, she’s so old she’s barely breathing. Sometimes, she’s so young she needs help talking. Sometimes she’s a teen, sometimes a young woman, sometimes middle aged. But always she has that faint smile and piercing gaze. She leads with the point. She knows everything. Any secret, any knowledge, any fact. She knows it. But she won’t give it for free. You see, there’s only one thing she doesn’t know. And that’s experiences. She can look at two lovers and tell you every opinion they have on the relationship, tell you what neurons are firing and what hormones are being released. But she doesn’t know what it’s like to be in love. So she wants your memories. She’ll just pluck them out of your head. The harder to obtain your knowledge is, the more important the memory has to be. Trivia you could get away with your trip to the supermarket. Classified information you might need to give up the memory of your first kiss. Grand secrets of the universe might need an entire childhood. She’ll take traumatic experiences- after experiencing nothing, even pain is better- but she prefers pleasant memories. Incredibly happy memories are worth much more, while miserable ones are worth less. A truly horrific experience will be near worthless, I’m afraid. She looks at you. Well? She’s an old woman (for now). She’s waiting. Are you in or not?
  4. The Money Giver: You'd barely notice this person. You can’t tell their sex, their race, their age. They’re average height, average weight, neither ugly or attractive. They talk in a voice utterly lacking emotion or accent, and explain that they have realized what humans really value. “Money”. They will give you “money”. They will give you a lot of money, if you ask. Direct to your bank account, by default, but it you want it in cash or cheque or gold or bitcoin or something they’ll provide. They almost show a hint of smugness when they confirm the taxmen of your world have no hope of exposing them. It’ll be fully laundered. What they want is control. They’ll take control of your body for a bit. They promise not to kill anyone directly or harm your body. For a few hundred, it may only be for an hour. A thousand might get them a day. A million will get them six months. A billion will get them a decade. Of course, richer you are, the better your odds of dealing with the aftermath once you get your body back. You have traded control of your life for money before. Do so again. Sign the contract.
  5. The Dream Author: he’s rail thin, heavily scarred, scribbling in a book as you speak. It takes him clear effort to stop and look up at you to begin his pitch. How would you like to visit one of his stories? It’ll be perfectly realistic, and it can feel like up to a decade. And he can write you however you want. He doesn’t judge, he’s written stories for all kinds of people. You wanna be a brutal god-king, crushing all opposition? You wanna be a hero who saves millions? You wanna just fuck? He prides himself on being a multi-genre writer. Whatever you provide, he can work with. It’s not real, of course. After the decade, you’ll wake where you were, only a few seconds having passed, as if it never happened. You’ll remember it all, don’t worry. All it costs is something you significantly emotionally value. Maybe an precious photo or something. Artists can’t be choosers. How long does it take to go onto pets or people? Well, depends on how often you enter a story, and how long it takes you to run out. If you're scared of spiraling, he’ll offer you a deal. Pay up front- destroy every object, kill every person, burn everything you care about- and he’ll put you in a story permanently. For as long as you subjectively like, in whatever world you like. If the cost really upsets you, he’ll make you imaginary versions of the people you love. You can do that, in his stories. You can do anything in his stories.
  6. The Luck Trader. They’re androgynous and beautiful, dressed delicately. They’re always grinning, and never still. They talk musically and never touch iron. They have a sack, and inside are tokens. Tokens of luck. Lucky in love? Lucky in money? Lucky in health? Whatever area you want, they can give it to you. Just have the token on you, and watch the luck flow towards you. It’s not perfect- this isn’t “winning lottery ticket rains down from the sky” luck- but things will go your way far more often then would otherwise be the case. It’s a boost, but it’s a hefty boost. If you take advantage, you could go very far in life. Of course, the tokens need activating. Just choose someone to activate it. It has to be someone you know personally- not necessarily someone you like, or know well, but you need to have had at least one genuine conversation with them. And the Trader will take them away. They’ll just be gone. No-one will ever find them. And you will get your token. Buy as many tokens as you like! You just need to keep offering up people, and you’ll get as many lucky breaks as you want. Their eyes glitter with hunger as they speak. Just give them people and watch the doors of the world open before you. It's a bargain.
submitted by Urbenmyth to 6Perks [link] [comments]

$1k invested in Top 10 Cryptos on Jan. 1, 2020 now worth $1,264 (UP +26%)

$1k invested in Top 10 Cryptos on Jan. 1, 2020 now worth $1,264 (UP +26%)
EXPERIMENT - Tracking Top 10 Cryptos of 2020 - Month Six - UP +26%
See the full blog post with all the tables here.
Not sure what this is all about? Here is the history and ground rules of these experiments.
tl;dr - This snapshot was taken on July 1st, 2020. By the slimmest of margins, the 2020 Top Ten is still the best performing of the three experiments. In June: Tether holds its ground, as a stablecoin should, all others finish the month in negative territory. BSV loses nearly a quarter of its value in June and is worst performing for the second straight month. Overall, since January 2020, it is Tezos in lead (+88%) followed by second place ETH (+79%). The 2020 Top 10 is up +26% compared to the -4% loss of the S&P 500 since 01.01.2020.

Month Six – UP 26%

Lots of red this month
While technically still the best performing of the Top Ten “Index Fund” Experiments for the fifth straight month, this month the 2020 Top Ten cut it close. Very close.
How close? The 2020 Top Ten is up +26.6% compared to the 2019 Top Ten’s +25.9%.
Watch your back, 2020 Top Ten.

Question of the month:

Which country trialed Bitcoin payments for passports in June?

A) Costa Rica B) Venezuela C) Mongolia D) Eritrea
Scroll down for the answer.

Ranking and June Winners and Losers


Movement in rank
After a very strange zero movement May, we saw some ups and down with the 2020 Top Ten in June. Okay, mostly downs: XRP fell one, dropping it’s long-held #3 slot. Both EOS and Tezos struggled in June: both lost two places in the rankings and both dropped out of the Top Ten. Tether is the only crypto to make a positive move in June, never a good sign.
June Winners – Just Tether. The rest of the field struggled in June. ETH finished in second place, ending the month down -7%.
June LosersBSV under-performed its peers for the second straight month, losing almost a quarter of its value (-23%) in June. Tezos also struggled, down -18% since the beginning of June.
For those keeping score, I also keep a tally of which coins have the most monthly wins and losses. Tether and Tezos have won two months each. BSV has finished in last place three out of the first six months of the 2020 Top Ten Experiment.

Overall update – Tezos in lead, ETH takes second place from BSV, and 80% of Top Ten are in positive territory.

Despite a bad month, Tezos (+88% since January 2020) maintained its lead. Ethereum (+79%) isn’t far behind in second place and has overtaken third place BSV (+59%). Not counting Tether, the worst performing crypto is XRP, down -7% on the year.

Total Market Cap for the cryptocurrency sector:

The overall crypto market lost over $20B in June but is still up +38% since the beginning this year’s experiment in January 2020.

Bitcoin dominance:

Bitcoin dominance fell a tiny bit, but hasn’t really made a significant move all year.

Overall return on investment since January 1st, 2020:

After an initial $1000 investment, the 2020 Top Ten Portfolio is now worth $1,264, up +26.4%. It is the best performing of the three Top Ten Crypto Index Fund Portfolio, but just barely: the 2019 group came in at +25.9% in June.
Here’s the month by month ROI o