How Many Transactions In A Bitcoin Block | CryptoCoins

/r/Scams Common Scam Master Post

Hello visitors and subscribers of scams! Here you will find a master list of common (and uncommon) scams that you may encounter online or in real life. Thank you to the many contributors who helped create this thread!

If you know of a scam that is not covered here, write a comment and it will be added to the next edition.

Previous threads: https://old.reddit.com/Scams/search?q=common+scams+master+post&restrict_sr=on
Blackmail email scam thread: https://old.reddit.com/Scams/comments/g8jqnthe_blackmail_email_scam_part_5//
Some of these articles are from small, local publications and refer to the scam happening in a specific area. Do not think that this means that the scam won't happen in your area.

Spoofing

Caller ID spoofing
It is very easy for anyone to make a phone call while having any number show up on the caller ID of the person receiving the phone call. Receiving a phone call from a certain number does not mean that the person/company who owns that number has actually called you.
Email spoofing
The "from" field of an email can be set by the sender, meaning that you can receive scam emails that look like they are from legitimate addresses. It's important to never click links in emails unless absolutely necessary, for example a password reset link you requested or an account activation link for an account you created.
SMS spoofing
SMS messages can be spoofed, so be wary of messages that seem to be from your friends or other trusted people.

The most common scams

The fake check scam (Credit to nimble2 for this part)
The fake check scam arises from many different situations (for instance, you applied for a job, or you are selling something on a place like Craigslist, or someone wants to purchase goods or services from your business, or you were offered a job as a mystery shopper, you were asked to wrap your car with an advertisement, or you received a check in the mail for no reason), but the bottom line is always something like this:
General fraudulent funds scams If somebody is asking you to accept and send out money as a favour or as part of a job, it is a fraudulent funds scam. It does not matter how they pay you, any payment on any service can be fraudulent and will be reversed when it is discovered to be fraudulent.
Phone verification code scams Someone will ask you to receive a verification text and then tell you to give them the code. Usually the code will come from Google Voice, or from Craigslist. In the Google version of the scam, your phone number will be used to verify a Google Voice account that the scammer will use to scam people with. In the Craigslist version of the scam, your phone number will be used to verify a Craigslist posting that the scammer will use to scam people. There is also an account takeover version of this scam that will involve the scammer sending a password reset token to your phone number and asking you for it.
Bitcoin job scams
Bitcoin job scams involve some sort of fraudulent funds transfer, usually a fake check although a fraudulent bank transfer can be used as well. The scammer will send you the fraudulent money and ask you to purchase bitcoins. This is a scam, and you will have zero recourse after you send the scammer bitcoins.
Email flooding
If you suddenly receive hundreds or thousands of spam emails, usually subscription confirmations, it's very likely that one of your online accounts has been taken over and is being used fraudulently. You should check any of your accounts that has a credit card linked to it, preferably from a computer other than the one you normally use. You should change all of your passwords to unique passwords and you should start using two factor authentication everywhere.
Boss/CEO scam A scammer will impersonate your boss or someone who works at your company and will ask you to run an errand for them, which will usually be purchasing gift cards and sending them the code. Once the scammer has the code, you have no recourse.
Employment certification scams
You will receive a job offer that is dependent on you completing a course or receiving a certification from a company the scammer tells you about. The scammer operates both websites and the job does not exist.
Craigslist fake payment scams
Scammers will ask you about your item that you have listed for sale on a site like Craigslist, and will ask to pay you via Paypal. They are scamming you, and the payment in most cases does not actually exist, the email you received was sent by the scammers. In cases where you have received a payment, the scammer can dispute the payment or the payment may be entirely fraudulent. The scammer will then either try to get you to send money to them using the fake funds that they did not send to you, or will ask you to ship the item, usually to a re-shipping facility or a parcel mule.
General fraudulent funds scams The fake check scam is not the only scam that involves accepting fraudulent/fake funds and purchasing items for scammers. If your job or opportunity involves accepting money and then using that money, it is almost certainly a frauduent funds scam. Even if the payment is through a bank transfer, Paypal, Venmo, Zelle, Interac e-Transfer, etc, it does not matter.
Credit card debt scam
Fraudsters will offer to pay off your bills, and will do so with fraudulent funds. Sometimes it will be your credit card bill, but it can be any bill that can be paid online. Once they pay it off, they will ask you to send them money or purchase items for them. The fraudulent transaction will be reversed in the future and you will never be able to keep the money. This scam happens on sites like Craigslist, Twitter, Instagram, and also some dating sites, including SeekingArrangement.
The parcel mule scam
A scammer will contact you with a job opportunity that involves accepting and reshipping packages. The packages are either stolen or fraudulently obtained items, and you will not be paid by the scammer. Here is a news article about a scam victim who fell for this scam and reshipped over 20 packages containing fraudulently acquired goods.
The Skype sex scam
You're on Facebook and you get a friend request from a cute girl you've never met. She wants to start sexting and trading nudes. She'll ask you to send pictures or videos or get on webcam where she can see you naked with your face in the picture. The scam: There's no girl. You've sent nudes to a guy pretending to be a girl. As soon as he has the pictures he'll demand money and threaten to send the pictures to your friends and family. Sometimes the scammer will upload the video to a porn site or Youtube to show that they are serious.
What to do if you are a victim of this scam: You cannot buy silence, you can only rent it. Paying the blackmailer will show them that the information they have is valuable and they will come after you for more money. Let your friends and family know that you were scammed and tell them to ignore friend requests or messages from people they don't know. Also, make sure your privacy settings are locked down and consider deactivating your account.
The underage girl scam
You're on a dating site or app and you get contacted by a cute girl. She wants to start sexting and trading nudes. Eventually she stops communicating and you get a call from a pissed off guy claiming to be the girl's father, or a police officer, or a private investigator, or something else along those lines. Turns out the girl you were sexting is underage, and her parents want some money for various reasons, such as to pay for a new phone, to pay for therapy, etc. There is, of course, no girl. You were communicating with a scammer.
What to do if you are a victim of this scam: Stop picking up the phone when the scammers call. Do not pay them, or they will be after you for more money.
Phishing
Phishing is when a scammer tries to trick you into giving information to them, such as your password or private financial information. Phishing messages will usually look very similar to official messages, and sometimes they are identical. If you are ever required to login to a different account in order to use a service, you should be incredibly cautious.
The blackmail email scam The exact wording of the emails varies, but there are generally four main parts. They claim to have placed software/malware on a porn/adult video site, they claim to have a video of you masturbating or watching porn, they threaten to release the video to your friends/family/loved ones/boss/dog, and they demand that you pay them in order for them to delete the video. Rest assured that this is a very common spam campaign and there is no truth behind the email or the threats. Here are some news articles about this scam.
The blackmail mail scam
This is very similar to the blackmail email scam, but you will receive a letter in the mail.
Rental scams Usually on local sites like Craigslist, scammers will steal photos from legitimate real estate listings and will list them for rent at or below market rate. They will generally be hesitant to tell you the address of the property for "safety reasons" and you will not be able to see the unit. They will then ask you to pay them a deposit and they claim they will ship you the keys. In reality, your money is gone and you will have no recourse.
Craigslist vehicle scams A scammer will list a vehicle on Craigslist and will offer to ship you the car. In many cases they will also falsely claim to sell you the car through eBay or Amazon. If you are looking for a car on Craigslist and the seller says anything about shipping the car, having an agent, gives you a long story about why they are selling the car, or the listing price is far too low, you are talking to a scammer and you should ignore and move on.
Advance-fee scam, also known as the 419 scam, or the Nigerian prince scam. You will receive a communication from someone who claims that you are entitled to a large sum of money, or you can help them obtain a large sum of money. However, they will need money from you before you receive the large sum.
Man in the middle scams
Man in the middle scams are very common and very hard to detect. The scammer will impersonate a company or person you are legitimately doing business with, and they will ask you to send the money to one of their own bank accounts or one controlled by a money mule. They have gained access to the legitimate persons email address, so there will be nothing suspicious about the email. To prevent this, make contact in a different way that lets you verify that the person you are talking to is the person you think you are talking to.
Cam girl voting/viewer scam
You will encounter a "cam girl" on a dating/messaging/social media/whatever site/app, and the scammer will ask you to go to their site and sign up with your credit card. They may offer a free show, or ask you to vote for them, or any number of other fake stories.
Amateur porn recruitment scam
You will encounter a "pornstar" on a dating/messaging/social media/whatever site/app, and the scammer will ask you to create an adult film with hehim, but first you need to do something. The story here is usually something to do with verifying your age, or you needing to take an STD test that involves sending money to a site operated by the scammer.
Hot girl SMS spam
You receive a text from a random number with a message along the lines of "Hey babe I'm here in town again if you wanted to meet up this time, are you around?" accompanied by a NSFW picture of a hot girl. It's spam, and they'll direct you to their scam website that requires a credit card.
Identity verification scam
You will encounter someone on a dating/messaging/social media/whatever site/app, and the scammer will ask that you verify your identity as they are worried about catfishing. The scammer operates the site, and you are not talking to whoever you think you are talking to.
This type of scam teases you with something, then tries to make you sign up for something else that costs money. The company involved is often innocent, but they turn a blind eye to the practice as it helps their bottom line, even if they have to occasionally issue refunds. A common variation takes place on dating sites/dating apps, where you will match with someone who claims to be a camgirl who wants you to sign up for a site and vote for her. Another variation takes place on local sites like Craigslist, where the scammers setup fake rental scams and demand that you go through a specific service for a credit check. Once you go through with it, the scammer will stop talking to you. Another variation also takes place on local sites like Craigslist, where scammers will contact you while you are selling a car and will ask you to purchase a Carfax-like report from a specific website.
Multi Level Marketing or Affiliate Marketing
You apply for a vague job listing for 'sales' on craigslist. Or maybe an old friend from high school adds you on Facebook and says they have an amazing business opportunity for you. Or maybe the well dressed guy who's always interviewing people in the Starbucks that you work at asks if you really want to be slinging coffee the rest of your life. The scam: MLMs are little more than pyramid schemes. They involve buying some sort of product (usually snake oil health products like body wraps or supplements) and shilling them to your friends and family. They claim that the really money is recruiting people underneath you who give you a slice of whatever they sell. And if those people underneath you recruit more people, you get a piece of their sales. Ideally if you big enough pyramid underneath you the money will roll in without any work on your part. Failure to see any profit will be your fault for not "wanting it enough." The companies will claim that you need to buy their extra training modules or webinars to really start selling. But in reality, the vast majority of people who buy into a MLM won't see a cent. At the end of the day all you'll be doing is annoying your friends and family with your constant recruitment efforts. What to look out for: Recruiters love to be vague. They won't tell you the name of the company or what exactly the job will entail. They'll pump you up with promises of "self-generating income", "being your own boss", and "owning your own company." They might ask you to read books about success and entrepreneurs. They're hoping you buy into the dream first. If you get approached via social media, check their timelines. MLMs will often instruct their victims to pretend that they've already made it. They'll constantly post about how they're hustling and making the big bucks and linking to youtube videos about success. Again, all very vague about what their job actually entails. If you think you're being recruited: Ask them what exactly the job is. If they can't answer its probably a MLM. Just walk away.

Phone scams

You should generally avoid answering or engaging with random phone calls. Picking up and engaging with a scam call tells the scammers that your phone number is active, and will usually lead to more calls.
Tax Call
You get a call from somebody claiming to be from your countries tax agency. They say you have unpaid taxes that need to be paid immediately, and you may be arrested or have other legal action taken against you if it is not paid. This scam has caused the American IRS, Canadian CRA, British HMRC, and Australian Tax Office to issue warnings. This scam happens in a wide variety of countries all over the world.
Warrant Call
Very similar to the tax call. You'll get a phone call from an "agent", "officer", "sheriff", or other law enforcement officer claiming that there is a warrant out for your arrest and you will be arrested very soon. They will then offer to settle everything for a fee, usually paid in giftcards.
[Legal Documents/Process Server Calls]
Very similar to the warrant call. You'll get a phone call from a scammer claiming that they are going to serve you legal documents, and they will threaten you with legal consequences if you refuse to comply. They may call themselves "investigators", and will sometimes give you a fake case number.
Student Loan Forgiveness Scam
Scammers will call you and tell you about a student loan forgiveness program, but they are interested in obtaining private information about you or demanding money in order to join the fake program.
Tech Support Call You receive a call from someone with a heavy accent claiming to be a technician Microsoft or your ISP. They inform you that your PC has a virus and your online banking and other accounts may be compromised if the virus is not removed. They'll have you type in commands and view diagnostics on your PC which shows proof of the virus. Then they'll have you install remote support software so the technician can work on your PC, remove the virus, and install security software. The cost of the labor and software can be hundreds of dollars. The scam: There's no virus. The technician isn't a technician and does not work for Microsoft or your ISP. Scammers (primarily out of India) use autodialers to cold-call everyone in the US. Any file they point out to you or command they have you run is completely benign. The software they sell you is either freeware or ineffective. What to do you if you're involved with this scam: If the scammers are remotely on your computer as you read this, turn off your PC or laptop via the power button immediately, and then if possible unplug your internet connection. Some of the more vindictive tech scammers have been known to create boot passwords on your computer if they think you've become wise to them and aren't going to pay up. Hang up on the scammers, block the number, and ignore any threats about payment. Performing a system restore on your PC is usually all that is required to remove the scammer's common remote access software. Reports of identity theft from fake tech calls are uncommon, but it would still be a good idea to change your passwords for online banking and monitor your accounts for any possible fraud. How to avoid: Ignore any calls claiming that your PC has a virus. Microsoft will never contact you. If you're unsure if a call claiming to be from your ISP is legit, hang up, and then dial the customer support number listed on a recent bill. If you have elderly relatives or family that isn't tech savvy, take the time to fill them in on this scam.
Chinese government scam
This scam is aimed at Chinese people living in Europe and North America, and involves a voicemail from someone claiming to be associated with the Chinese government, usually through the Chinese consulate/embassy, who is threatening legal action or making general threats.
Chinese shipping scam
This scam is similar to the Chinese government scam, but involves a seized/suspicious package, and the scammers will connect the victim to other scammers posing as Chinese government investigators.
Social security suspension scam
You will receive a call from someone claiming to work for the government regarding suspicious activity, fraud, or serious crimes connected to your social security number. You'll be asked to speak to an operator and the operator will explain the steps you need to follow in order to fix the problems. It's all a scam, and will lead to you losing money and could lead to identity theft if you give them private financial information.
Utilities cutoff
You get a call from someone who claims that they are from your utility company, and they claim that your utilities will be shut off unless you immediately pay. The scammer will usually ask for payment via gift cards, although they may ask for payment in other ways, such as Western Union or bitcoin.
Relative in custody Scammer claims to be the police, and they have your son/daughtenephew/estranged twin in custody. You need to post bail (for some reason in iTunes gift cards or MoneyGram) immediately or the consequences will never be the same.
Mexican family scam
This scam comes in many different flavours, but always involves someone in your family and Mexico. Sometimes the scammer will claim that your family member has been detained, sometimes the scammer will claim that your family member has been kidnapped, and sometimes the scammer will claim that your family member is injured and needs help.
General family scams
Scammers will gather a large amount of information about you and target your family members using different stories with the goal of gettimg them to send money.
One ring scam
Scammers will call you from an international number with the goal of getting you to return their call, causing you to incur expensive calling fees.

Online shopping scams

THE GOLDEN RULE OF ONLINE SHOPPING: If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.
Dropshipping
An ad on reddit or social media sites like Facebook and Instagram offers items at huge discounts or even free (sometimes requiring you to reblog or like their page). They just ask you to pay shipping. The scam: The item will turn out to be very low quality and will take weeks or even months to arrive. Sometimes the item never arrives, and the store disappears or stops responding. The seller drop-ships the item from China. The item may only cost a few dollars, and the Chinese government actually pays for the shipping. You end up paying $10-$15 dollars for a $4 item, with the scammer keeping the profit. If you find one of these scams but really have your heart set on the item, you can find it on AliExpress or another Chinese retailer.
Influencer scams
A user will reach out to you on a social media platform, usually Instagram, and offer you the chance to partner with them and receive a free/discounted product, as long as you pay shipping. This is a different version of the dropshipping scam, and is just a marketing technique to get you to buy their products.
Triangulation fraud
Triangulation fraud occurs when you make a purchase on a site like Amazon or eBay for an item at a lower than market price, and receive an item that was clearly purchased new at full price. The scammer uses a stolen credit card to order your item, while the money from the listing is almost all profit for the scammer.
Instagram influencer scams
Someone will message you on Instagram asking you to promote their products, and offering you a discount code. The items are Chinese junk, and the offer is made to many people at a time.
Cheap Items
Many websites pop up and offer expensive products, including electronics, clothes, watches, sunglasses, and shoes at very low prices. The scam: Some sites are selling cheap knock-offs. Some will just take your money and run. What to do if you think you're involved with this scam: Contact your bank or credit card and dispute the charge. How to avoid: The sites often have every brand-name shoe or fashion item (Air Jordan, Yeezy, Gucci, etc) in stock and often at a discounted price. The site will claim to be an outlet for a major brand or even a specific line or item. The site will have images at the bottom claiming to be Secured by Norton or various official payment processors but not actual links. The site will have poor grammar and a mish-mash of categories. Recently, established websites will get hacked or their domain name jacked and turned into scam stores, meaning the domain name of the store will be completely unrelated to the items they're selling. If the deal sounds too good to be true it probably is. Nobody is offering brand new iPhones or Beats or Nintendo Switches for 75% off.
Cheap Amazon 3rd Party Items
You're on Amazon or maybe just Googling for an item and you see it for an unbelievable price from a third-party seller. You know Amazon has your back so you order it. The scam: One of three things usually happen: 1) The seller marks the items as shipped and sends a fake tracking number. Amazon releases the funds to the seller, and the seller disappears. Amazon ultimately refunds your money. 2) The seller immediately cancels the order and instructs you to re-order the item directly from their website, usually with the guarantee that the order is still protected by Amazon. The seller takes your money and runs. Amazon informs you that they do not offer protection on items sold outside of Amazon and cannot help you. 2) The seller immediately cancels the order and instructs you to instead send payment via an unused Amazon gift card by sending the code on the back via email. Once the seller uses the code, the money on the card is gone and cannot be refunded. How to avoid: These scammers can be identified by looking at their Amazon storefronts. They'll be brand new sellers offering a wide range of items at unbelievable prices. Usually their Amazon names will be gibberish, or a variation on FIRSTNAME.LASTNAME. Occasionally however, established storefronts will be hacked. If the deal is too good to be true its most likely a scam.
Scams on eBay
There are scams on eBay targeting both buyers and sellers. As a seller, you should look out for people who privately message you regarding the order, especially if they ask you to ship to a different address or ask to negotiate via text/email/a messaging service. As a buyer you should look out for new accounts selling in-demand items, established accounts selling in-demand items that they have no previous connection to (you can check their feedback history for a general idea of what they bought/sold in the past), and lookout for people who ask you to go off eBay and use another service to complete the transaction. In many cases you will receive a fake tracking number and your money will be help up for up to a month.
Scams on Amazon
There are scams on Amazon targeting both buyers and sellers. As a seller, you should look out for people who message you about a listing. As a buyer you should look out for listings that have an email address for you to contact the person to complete the transaction, and you should look out for cheap listings of in-demand items.
Scams on Reddit
Reddit accounts are frequently purchased and sold by fraudsters who wish to use the high karma count + the age of the account to scam people on buy/sell subreddits. You need to take precautions and be safe whenever you are making a transaction online.
Computer scams
Virus scam
A popup or other ad will say that you have a virus and you need to follow their advice in order to remove it. They are lying, and either want you to install malware or pay for their software.

Assorted scams

Chinese Brushing / direct shipping
If you have ever received an unsolicited small package from China, your address was used to brush. Vendors place fake orders for their own products and send out the orders so that they can increase their ratings.
Money flipping
Scammer claims to be a banking insider who can double/triple/bazoople any amount of money you send them, with no consequences of any kind. Obviously, the money disappears into their wallet the moment you send it.

Door to door scams

As a general rule, you should not engage with door to door salesmen. If you are interested in the product they are selling, check online first.
Selling Magazines
Someone or a group will come to your door and offer to sell a magazine subscription. Often the subscriptions are not for the duration or price you were told, and the magazines will often have tough or impossible cancellation policies.
Energy sales
Somebody will come to your door claiming to be from an energy company. They will ask to see your current energy bill so that they can see how much you pay. They will then offer you a discount if you sign up with them, and promise to handle everything with your old provider. Some of these scammers will "slam" you, by using your account number that they saw on your bill to switch you to their service without authorization, and some will scam you by charging higher prices than the ones you agreed on.
Security system scams
Scammers will come to your door and ask about your security system, and offer to sell you a new one. These scammers are either selling you overpriced low quality products, or are casing your home for a future burglary.
They ask to enter your home
While trying to sell you whatever, they suddenly need to use your bathroom, or they've been writing against the wall and ask to use your table instead. Or maybe they just moved into the neighborhood and want to see how you decorate for ideas.
They're scoping out you and your place. They want to see what valuables you have, how gullible you are, if you have a security system or dogs, etc.

Street scams

Begging With a Purpose
"I just need a few more dollars for the bus," at the bus station, or "I just need $5 to get some gas," at a gas station. There's also a variation where you will be presented with a reward: "I just need money for a cab to get uptown, but I'll give you sports tickets/money/a date/a priceless vase."
Three Card Monte, Also Known As The Shell Game
Unbeatable. The people you see winning are in on the scam.
Drop and Break
You bump into someone and they drop their phone/glasses/fancy bottle of wine/priceless vase and demand you pay them back. In reality, it's a $2 pair of reading glasses/bottle of three-buck-chuck/tasteful but affordable vase.
CD Sales
You're handed a free CD so you can check out the artist's music. They then ask for your name and immediately write it on the CD. Once they've signed your name, they ask you for money, saying they can't give it to someone else now. Often they use dry erase markers, or cheap CD sleeves. Never use any type of storage device given to you by a random person, as the device can contain malware.
White Van Speaker Scam
You're approached and offered speakers/leather jackets/other luxury goods at a discount. The scammer will have an excuse as to why the price is so low. After you buy them, you'll discover that they are worthless.
iPhone Street Sale
You're approached and shown an iPhone for sale, coming in the box, but it's open and you can see the phone. If you buy the phone, you'll get an iPhone box with no iPhone, just some stones or cheap metal in it to weigh it down.
Buddhist Monk Pendant
A monk in traditional garb approaches you, hands you a gold trinket, and asks for a donation. He holds either a notebook with names and amounts of donation (usually everyone else has donated $5+), or a leaflet with generic info. This is fairly common in NYC, and these guys get aggressive quickly.
Friendship Bracelet Scam More common in western Europe, you're approached by someone selling bracelets. They quickly wrap a loop of fabric around your finger and pull it tight, starting to quickly weave a bracelet. The only way to (easily) get it off your hand is to pay. Leftover sales
This scam involves many different items, but the idea is usually the same: you are approached by someone who claims to have a large amount of excess inventory and offers to sell it to you at a great price. The scammer actually has low quality items and will lie to you about the price/origin of the items.
Dent repair scams
Scammers will approach you in public about a dent in your car and offer to fix it for a low price. Often they will claim that they are mechanics. They will not fix the dent in your car, but they will apply large amounts of wax or other substances to hide the dent while they claim that the substance requires time to harden.
Gold ring/jewelry/valuable item scam
A scammer will "find" a gold ring or other valuable item and offers to sell it to you. The item is fake and you will never see the scammer again.
Distraction theft
One person will approach you and distract you, while their accomplice picks your pockets. The distraction can take many forms, but if you are a tourist and are approached in public, watch closely for people getting close to you.

General resources

Site to report scams in the United Kingdom: http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/
Site to report scams in the United States: https://www.ic3.gov/default.aspx
Site to report scams in Canada: www.antifraudcentre-centreantifraude.ca/reportincident-signalerincident/index-eng.htm
Site to report scams in Europe: https://www.europol.europa.eu/report-a-crime/report-cybercrime-online
FTC scam alerts: https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/scam-alerts
Microsoft's anti-scam guide: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/safety/online-privacy/avoid-phone-scams.aspx
https://www.usa.gov/common-scams-frauds
https://www.usa.gov/scams-and-frauds
https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/features/scam-alerts
https://www.fbi.gov/scams-and-safety/common-fraud-schemes
submitted by EugeneBYMCMB to Scams [link] [comments]

I ordered myself on the dark web.

I know you’re frowning. The title is weird, I know. But, if you could just give me a moment I'll explain. I'll have to be fast though, I don't know how close they are.

Essentially, I ordered myself on the dark web.

I'm a drug user, I'll admit it. Weed is my usual go to, but I buy that off my friend. If, however, I want to get something a little heavier, like acid, or coke, I'd just order it off the dark web. It's surprisingly simple. A few clicks, some bitcoin transfers and then boom, I have acid in my PO box.

But I'm also a curious guy. The dark web has always... intrigued me. Up until a few days ago, I had only been on there to buy drugs off sites some of my friends gave to me. But, late one night I was sober and at home, which was a rare thing for me. So, since I was bored I decided to boot up my tor browser and try and see what sort of fucked up shit I could find on the dark web. If you've ever been on the dark web, you'll know that you can't just search up "red rooms," or "hitman for hire," and get results. No, you have to find links to these websites first.

So I hopped back onto google again to try and find some links to a messed up website. I know it's weird that I was actively searching for the worst, but as soon as I got on the dark web that night I had a sense of morbid curiosity overcame me. Anyway, I spent a little while trying to find some links. Anything that I found though was either too tame for me, or the links didn't work. At this point, I was about ready to give up, and I wish I had.

But, in one final attempt, I clicked on Reddit. Hoping onto deepweb, I didn't think I would find anything. So, I just scrolled through hot for about half an hour before sorting by new. Then, I found it.

One, simple text post titled: "SLAYERS ASSASSINATION AND LIFE RUINING SERVICES." In the text box in the post was what seemed to be just a random assortment of numbers and letters (zy3dkytcaubkq2y3, for those of you curious ). It took my tired brain a second to figure out what it was, but I realized pretty quickly. It was a link, presumably to a hitman website.

So, I decided to paste the link into my dark web browser and what do you know, it worked. But, before I decided to go any further I figured I should go back to OP's profile to see if they have posted any other dark web links. However, when I went back to the post in question OP's profile was deleted. Weird.

Anyway, I re-opened my dark web tab and hopped onto the site. Up along the top of the website was it's name, SLAYERS ASSASSINATION AND LIFE RUINING SERVICES and next to it what looked to be a skull inside of a crosshair. I chuckled when I saw that, the site must be fake. Upon scrolling down however, I was not disappointed.

There was a paragraph of white text on a black background, and a small box to the right of the text that just said 'place an order.' The text was the main part though, as it took up most of the page. It read:

"Slayers assassinations and life ruining services offers everything from acid attack, crippling, blinding, castration, torture, rape, beatings and good old death. We have the lowest prices out of any other company running similar services, and we are world wide! We have a dedicated and experienced group of staff based all over the world, so if you need someone to be assassinated, or maybe you just want them scarred for life, don't hesitate to contact us!"

Again I laughed. This had to be satire, right? Hell, I was even tempted to order it on someone just to see what would happen. Ironically, I actually have a half-decent job so I can afford to. Better not to risk it though, I thought to myself.

I was about to close my computer and call it for a night when I heard a knock at the door. I live alone, so it was unusual to get visitors, especially so late at night. But, when I opened my door it was just my good buddy Mark, who also happened to be my weed plug.

As I opened the door, he didn't hesitate to let himself in and shove a big baggie full of pot in my face.
"This, dude, if the best shit I've had in a minute, we gotta try some."

I couldn't say no.

Cut to a couple hours later, it's early morning and Mark and I are chilling on my couch, both blazed as fuck. He suddenly decides to get up, and I assume he's going to get some leftover pizza, but he walks over to my desk and computer.

"Slayers assassinations, are you gonna kill someone or something?" he mutters.
"What?" I reply
"Your computer dude, it's got some hacker shit on it."
"It's the dark web man, don't fuck with it."

At this point I'm still on my couch, half asleep and not paying full attention, however I sat up pretty fast when he said the words: "Hey man, lets order a hitman on you."

I hoped up and walked over to my PC. Part of my brain was screaming no, what the fuck are you doing, but the majority of my brain (which was also they high part) was thinking about how funny it would be to order a hitman on myself. So I agree. I do made him get out my chair though, because I didn't want him seeing what my credit card numbers were as I transferred some bitcoin.

At the end, after I wrote down all my personal details, like my address, age, and even a photo, I had to select what I wanted to happen to me. I just selected plain old assassination, as it was actually cheaper than some of the other things. I could have paid an extra couple of grand to be beaten before my death, but even my high brain didn't want to splash the cash too much on my own death. God, this is ridiculous.

Anyway, I placed the order and then replied to a confirmation email, and boom. It was done. A couple of clicks and I had ordered myself on the dark web. Mark and I laughed about it for a while, but then he left about an hour later and I fell asleep not too long after.

I woke up around 9 a.m., which meant I got at least six hours of sleep, even if it felt like I got three. I got up and out of bed, threw on some track pants and a cotton shirt (yes, I sleep naked), and brewed myself a coffee before sitting down to play some games and just. enjoy my Sunday.

You can imagine how shocked I was when I saw that I had ordered my death the previous night.

Even though I thought the site was bullshit I still felt a pit open up in my stomach. Even when I'm high I usually can make sensible decisions. I chuckled, not like I could remember it anyway, but I guess Mark's new shit really was good.

I would assume a normal human being would do something else, but I was still kind of out of it from the night before so I just carried on with my day. I was a little more paranoid, sure, but as I said I just assumed it was bullshit. I even laughed at the email I got from the website, saying that their hitman has been dispatched and was on its way. It was like ordering a package of Amazon, I was tempted to email back and ask for some day delivery.

But I didn't need to ask, because that's exactly what I got. I didn't see it arrive, but around the time I started to cook myself a shitty dinner I noticed a blacked out sedan parked on the other side of the road from my house. I didn't live in a rural area, but there is a lot of trees and bushes between each of the houses on my street, so I would be surprised if any other house saw the car except for mine.

At this point, I was freaking out. What if the site was real? Even though I'm a big guy, I was freaking out. I don't own any weapons, aside from a slightly larger-than-average kitchen knife. Fuck it, I'm confronting it, I decided. I put on a hoodie and slid the knife into the front pocket before waltzing on out of my house and walking right up to the driver side window of the vehicle. Even I was astonished at my own courage.

Knocking on the window, nothing happened. It was... rather anti-climatic, I was fully prepared to have to fight for my life, all because I did something really dumb while I was baked. But, like I said, nothing happened. I even put my head right up to the window, as if there was a reflection, to try and get a better look to see whats inside.

I could barely see what was inside of the car, but all I could make out were two empty seats. No one was even inside. I had got all hyped up for nothing. I decided to wait out by the car for a bit, but after half an hour or so I was hungry and I had to go back inside to take my dinner out of the oven. I swear, it was only a minute between me going inside to take my dinner out of the oven and looking back out of the window, and the car being gone. I didn't even hear it go.

"Guess I'm eating my dinner with all my curtains closed and doors locked," I muttered to myself.

I had just started to calm down when the power shut off. It was sunny outside, and coupled with the car I now knew that this was the real deal. I had signed my own death warrant.

I ran into my upstairs bedroom and locked the door, and then hid under the bed. I couldn't all the cops, what would I say? "Oh yes hello sir, turns out while super high I paid 5k for some anonymous hitman to kill me and now he's arrived, send an officer asap please and thank you."

So, I just stayed hiding under my bed, and I still am now. I've been here for an hour now writing this. Think of this as my epitaph. I know I'm screwed. Just a minute ago I heard my back door slowly creak open. This piece of writing may seem humorous to you, the reader, but in reality as you read this I'm under my bed praying to a god that lost all faith in me years ago to spare me, to let me go.

But I know that won't happen. My bedroom door just opened and I can see a big pair of black boots.
submitted by alec2004 to nosleep [link] [comments]

/r/Scams Common Scam Master Post

Hello visitors and subscribers of scams! Here you will find a master list of common (and uncommon) scams that you may encounter online or in real life. Thank you to the many contributors who helped create this thread!

If you know of a scam that is not covered here, write a comment and it will be added to the next edition.

Previous threads: https://old.reddit.com/Scams/search?q=common+scams+master+post&restrict_sr=on
Blackmail email scam thread: https://reddit.com/Scams/comments/dohaea/the_blackmail_email_scam_part_4/
Some of these articles are from small, local publications and refer to the scam happening in a specific area. Do not think that this means that the scam won't happen in your area.

Spoofing

Caller ID spoofing
It is very easy for anyone to make a phone call while having any number show up on the caller ID of the person receiving the phone call. Receiving a phone call from a certain number does not mean that the person/company who owns that number has actually called you.
Email spoofing
The "from" field of an email can be set by the sender, meaning that you can receive scam emails that look like they are from legitimate addresses. It's important to never click links in emails unless absolutely necessary, for example a password reset link you requested or an account activation link for an account you created.
SMS spoofing
SMS messages can be spoofed, so be wary of messages that seem to be from your friends or other trusted people.

The most common scams

The fake check scam (Credit to nimble2 for this part)
The fake check scam arises from many different situations (for instance, you applied for a job, or you are selling something on a place like Craigslist, or someone wants to purchase goods or services from your business, or you were offered a job as a mystery shopper, you were asked to wrap your car with an advertisement, or you received a check in the mail for no reason), but the bottom line is always something like this:
General fraudulent funds scams If somebody is asking you to accept and send out money as a favour or as part of a job, it is a fraudulent funds scam. It does not matter how they pay you, any payment on any service can be fraudulent and will be reversed when it is discovered to be fraudulent.
Phone verification code scams Someone will ask you to receive a verification text and then tell you to give them the code. Usually the code will come from Google Voice, or from Craigslist. In the Google version of the scam, your phone number will be used to verify a Google Voice account that the scammer will use to scam people with. In the Craigslist version of the scam, your phone number will be used to verify a Craigslist posting that the scammer will use to scam people. There is also an account takeover version of this scam that will involve the scammer sending a password reset token to your phone number and asking you for it.
Bitcoin job scams
Bitcoin job scams involve some sort of fraudulent funds transfer, usually a fake check although a fraudulent bank transfer can be used as well. The scammer will send you the fraudulent money and ask you to purchase bitcoins. This is a scam, and you will have zero recourse after you send the scammer bitcoins.
Email flooding
If you suddenly receive hundreds or thousands of spam emails, usually subscription confirmations, it's very likely that one of your online accounts has been taken over and is being used fraudulently. You should check any of your accounts that has a credit card linked to it, preferably from a computer other than the one you normally use. You should change all of your passwords to unique passwords and you should start using two factor authentication everywhere.
Boss/CEO scam A scammer will impersonate your boss or someone who works at your company and will ask you to run an errand for them, which will usually be purchasing gift cards and sending them the code. Once the scammer has the code, you have no recourse.
Employment certification scams
You will receive a job offer that is dependent on you completing a course or receiving a certification from a company the scammer tells you about. The scammer operates both websites and the job does not exist.
Craigslist fake payment scams
Scammers will ask you about your item that you have listed for sale on a site like Craigslist, and will ask to pay you via Paypal. They are scamming you, and the payment in most cases does not actually exist, the email you received was sent by the scammers. In cases where you have received a payment, the scammer can dispute the payment or the payment may be entirely fraudulent. The scammer will then either try to get you to send money to them using the fake funds that they did not send to you, or will ask you to ship the item, usually to a re-shipping facility or a parcel mule.
General fraudulent funds scams The fake check scam is not the only scam that involves accepting fraudulent/fake funds and purchasing items for scammers. If your job or opportunity involves accepting money and then using that money, it is almost certainly a frauduent funds scam. Even if the payment is through a bank transfer, Paypal, Venmo, Zelle, Interac e-Transfer, etc, it does not matter.
Credit card debt scam
Fraudsters will offer to pay off your bills, and will do so with fraudulent funds. Sometimes it will be your credit card bill, but it can be any bill that can be paid online. Once they pay it off, they will ask you to send them money or purchase items for them. The fraudulent transaction will be reversed in the future and you will never be able to keep the money. This scam happens on sites like Craigslist, Twitter, Instagram, and also some dating sites, including SeekingArrangement.
The parcel mule scam
A scammer will contact you with a job opportunity that involves accepting and reshipping packages. The packages are either stolen or fraudulently obtained items, and you will not be paid by the scammer. Here is a news article about a scam victim who fell for this scam and reshipped over 20 packages containing fraudulently acquired goods.
The Skype sex scam
You're on Facebook and you get a friend request from a cute girl you've never met. She wants to start sexting and trading nudes. She'll ask you to send pictures or videos or get on webcam where she can see you naked with your face in the picture. The scam: There's no girl. You've sent nudes to a guy pretending to be a girl. As soon as he has the pictures he'll demand money and threaten to send the pictures to your friends and family. Sometimes the scammer will upload the video to a porn site or Youtube to show that they are serious.
What to do if you are a victim of this scam: You cannot buy silence, you can only rent it. Paying the blackmailer will show them that the information they have is valuable and they will come after you for more money. Let your friends and family know that you were scammed and tell them to ignore friend requests or messages from people they don't know. Also, make sure your privacy settings are locked down and consider deactivating your account.
The underage girl scam
You're on a dating site or app and you get contacted by a cute girl. She wants to start sexting and trading nudes. Eventually she stops communicating and you get a call from a pissed off guy claiming to be the girl's father, or a police officer, or a private investigator, or something else along those lines. Turns out the girl you were sexting is underage, and her parents want some money for various reasons, such as to pay for a new phone, to pay for therapy, etc. There is, of course, no girl. You were communicating with a scammer.
What to do if you are a victim of this scam: Stop picking up the phone when the scammers call. Do not pay them, or they will be after you for more money.
Phishing
Phishing is when a scammer tries to trick you into giving information to them, such as your password or private financial information. Phishing messages will usually look very similar to official messages, and sometimes they are identical. If you are ever required to login to a different account in order to use a service, you should be incredibly cautious.
The blackmail email scam The exact wording of the emails varies, but there are generally four main parts. They claim to have placed software/malware on a porn/adult video site, they claim to have a video of you masturbating or watching porn, they threaten to release the video to your friends/family/loved ones/boss/dog, and they demand that you pay them in order for them to delete the video. Rest assured that this is a very common spam campaign and there is no truth behind the email or the threats. Here are some news articles about this scam.
The blackmail mail scam
This is very similar to the blackmail email scam, but you will receive a letter in the mail.
Rental scams Usually on local sites like Craigslist, scammers will steal photos from legitimate real estate listings and will list them for rent at or below market rate. They will generally be hesitant to tell you the address of the property for "safety reasons" and you will not be able to see the unit. They will then ask you to pay them a deposit and they claim they will ship you the keys. In reality, your money is gone and you will have no recourse.
Craigslist vehicle scams A scammer will list a vehicle on Craigslist and will offer to ship you the car. In many cases they will also falsely claim to sell you the car through eBay or Amazon. If you are looking for a car on Craigslist and the seller says anything about shipping the car, having an agent, gives you a long story about why they are selling the car, or the listing price is far too low, you are talking to a scammer and you should ignore and move on.
Advance-fee scam, also known as the 419 scam, or the Nigerian prince scam. You will receive a communication from someone who claims that you are entitled to a large sum of money, or you can help them obtain a large sum of money. However, they will need money from you before you receive the large sum.
Man in the middle scams
Man in the middle scams are very common and very hard to detect. The scammer will impersonate a company or person you are legitimately doing business with, and they will ask you to send the money to one of their own bank accounts or one controlled by a money mule. They have gained access to the legitimate persons email address, so there will be nothing suspicious about the email. To prevent this, make contact in a different way that lets you verify that the person you are talking to is the person you think you are talking to.
Cam girl voting/viewer scam
You will encounter a "cam girl" on a dating/messaging/social media/whatever site/app, and the scammer will ask you to go to their site and sign up with your credit card. They may offer a free show, or ask you to vote for them, or any number of other fake stories.
Amateur porn recruitment scam
You will encounter a "pornstar" on a dating/messaging/social media/whatever site/app, and the scammer will ask you to create an adult film with hehim, but first you need to do something. The story here is usually something to do with verifying your age, or you needing to take an STD test that involves sending money to a site operated by the scammer.
Hot girl SMS spam
You receive a text from a random number with a message along the lines of "Hey babe I'm here in town again if you wanted to meet up this time, are you around?" accompanied by a NSFW picture of a hot girl. It's spam, and they'll direct you to their scam website that requires a credit card.
Identity verification scam
You will encounter someone on a dating/messaging/social media/whatever site/app, and the scammer will ask that you verify your identity as they are worried about catfishing. The scammer operates the site, and you are not talking to whoever you think you are talking to.
This type of scam teases you with something, then tries to make you sign up for something else that costs money. The company involved is often innocent, but they turn a blind eye to the practice as it helps their bottom line, even if they have to occasionally issue refunds. A common variation takes place on dating sites/dating apps, where you will match with someone who claims to be a camgirl who wants you to sign up for a site and vote for her. Another variation takes place on local sites like Craigslist, where the scammers setup fake rental scams and demand that you go through a specific service for a credit check. Once you go through with it, the scammer will stop talking to you. Another variation also takes place on local sites like Craigslist, where scammers will contact you while you are selling a car and will ask you to purchase a Carfax-like report from a specific website.
Multi Level Marketing or Affiliate Marketing
You apply for a vague job listing for 'sales' on craigslist. Or maybe an old friend from high school adds you on Facebook and says they have an amazing business opportunity for you. Or maybe the well dressed guy who's always interviewing people in the Starbucks that you work at asks if you really want to be slinging coffee the rest of your life. The scam: MLMs are little more than pyramid schemes. They involve buying some sort of product (usually snake oil health products like body wraps or supplements) and shilling them to your friends and family. They claim that the really money is recruiting people underneath you who give you a slice of whatever they sell. And if those people underneath you recruit more people, you get a piece of their sales. Ideally if you big enough pyramid underneath you the money will roll in without any work on your part. Failure to see any profit will be your fault for not "wanting it enough." The companies will claim that you need to buy their extra training modules or webinars to really start selling. But in reality, the vast majority of people who buy into a MLM won't see a cent. At the end of the day all you'll be doing is annoying your friends and family with your constant recruitment efforts. What to look out for: Recruiters love to be vague. They won't tell you the name of the company or what exactly the job will entail. They'll pump you up with promises of "self-generating income", "being your own boss", and "owning your own company." They might ask you to read books about success and entrepreneurs. They're hoping you buy into the dream first. If you get approached via social media, check their timelines. MLMs will often instruct their victims to pretend that they've already made it. They'll constantly post about how they're hustling and making the big bucks and linking to youtube videos about success. Again, all very vague about what their job actually entails. If you think you're being recruited: Ask them what exactly the job is. If they can't answer its probably a MLM. Just walk away.

Phone scams

You should generally avoid answering or engaging with random phone calls. Picking up and engaging with a scam call tells the scammers that your phone number is active, and will usually lead to more calls.
Tax Call
You get a call from somebody claiming to be from your countries tax agency. They say you have unpaid taxes that need to be paid immediately, and you may be arrested or have other legal action taken against you if it is not paid. This scam has caused the American IRS, Canadian CRA, British HMRC, and Australian Tax Office to issue warnings. This scam happens in a wide variety of countries all over the world.
Warrant Call
Very similar to the tax call. You'll get a phone call from an "agent", "officer", "sheriff", or other law enforcement officer claiming that there is a warrant out for your arrest and you will be arrested very soon. They will then offer to settle everything for a fee, usually paid in giftcards.
[Legal Documents/Process Server Calls]
Very similar to the warrant call. You'll get a phone call from a scammer claiming that they are going to serve you legal documents, and they will threaten you with legal consequences if you refuse to comply. They may call themselves "investigators", and will sometimes give you a fake case number.
Student Loan Forgiveness Scam
Scammers will call you and tell you about a student loan forgiveness program, but they are interested in obtaining private information about you or demanding money in order to join the fake program.
Tech Support Call You receive a call from someone with a heavy accent claiming to be a technician Microsoft or your ISP. They inform you that your PC has a virus and your online banking and other accounts may be compromised if the virus is not removed. They'll have you type in commands and view diagnostics on your PC which shows proof of the virus. Then they'll have you install remote support software so the technician can work on your PC, remove the virus, and install security software. The cost of the labor and software can be hundreds of dollars. The scam: There's no virus. The technician isn't a technician and does not work for Microsoft or your ISP. Scammers (primarily out of India) use autodialers to cold-call everyone in the US. Any file they point out to you or command they have you run is completely benign. The software they sell you is either freeware or ineffective. What to do you if you're involved with this scam: If the scammers are remotely on your computer as you read this, turn off your PC or laptop via the power button immediately, and then if possible unplug your internet connection. Some of the more vindictive tech scammers have been known to create boot passwords on your computer if they think you've become wise to them and aren't going to pay up. Hang up on the scammers, block the number, and ignore any threats about payment. Performing a system restore on your PC is usually all that is required to remove the scammer's common remote access software. Reports of identity theft from fake tech calls are uncommon, but it would still be a good idea to change your passwords for online banking and monitor your accounts for any possible fraud. How to avoid: Ignore any calls claiming that your PC has a virus. Microsoft will never contact you. If you're unsure if a call claiming to be from your ISP is legit, hang up, and then dial the customer support number listed on a recent bill. If you have elderly relatives or family that isn't tech savvy, take the time to fill them in on this scam.
Chinese government scam
This scam is aimed at Chinese people living in Europe and North America, and involves a voicemail from someone claiming to be associated with the Chinese government, usually through the Chinese consulate/embassy, who is threatening legal action or making general threats.
Chinese shipping scam
This scam is similar to the Chinese government scam, but involves a seized/suspicious package, and the scammers will connect the victim to other scammers posing as Chinese government investigators.
Social security suspension scam
You will receive a call from someone claiming to work for the government regarding suspicious activity, fraud, or serious crimes connected to your social security number. You'll be asked to speak to an operator and the operator will explain the steps you need to follow in order to fix the problems. It's all a scam, and will lead to you losing money and could lead to identity theft if you give them private financial information.
Utilities cutoff
You get a call from someone who claims that they are from your utility company, and they claim that your utilities will be shut off unless you immediately pay. The scammer will usually ask for payment via gift cards, although they may ask for payment in other ways, such as Western Union or bitcoin.
Relative in custody Scammer claims to be the police, and they have your son/daughtenephew/estranged twin in custody. You need to post bail (for some reason in iTunes gift cards or MoneyGram) immediately or the consequences will never be the same.
Mexican family scam
This scam comes in many different flavours, but always involves someone in your family and Mexico. Sometimes the scammer will claim that your family member has been detained, sometimes the scammer will claim that your family member has been kidnapped, and sometimes the scammer will claim that your family member is injured and needs help.
General family scams
Scammers will gather a large amount of information about you and target your family members using different stories with the goal of gettimg them to send money.
One ring scam
Scammers will call you from an international number with the goal of getting you to return their call, causing you to incur expensive calling fees.

Online shopping scams

THE GOLDEN RULE OF ONLINE SHOPPING: If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.
Dropshipping
An ad on reddit or social media sites like Facebook and Instagram offers items at huge discounts or even free (sometimes requiring you to reblog or like their page). They just ask you to pay shipping. The scam: The item will turn out to be very low quality and will take weeks or even months to arrive. Sometimes the item never arrives, and the store disappears or stops responding. The seller drop-ships the item from China. The item may only cost a few dollars, and the Chinese government actually pays for the shipping. You end up paying $10-$15 dollars for a $4 item, with the scammer keeping the profit. If you find one of these scams but really have your heart set on the item, you can find it on AliExpress or another Chinese retailer.
Influencer scams
A user will reach out to you on a social media platform, usually Instagram, and offer you the chance to partner with them and receive a free/discounted product, as long as you pay shipping. This is a different version of the dropshipping scam, and is just a marketing technique to get you to buy their products.
Triangulation fraud
Triangulation fraud occurs when you make a purchase on a site like Amazon or eBay for an item at a lower than market price, and receive an item that was clearly purchased new at full price. The scammer uses a stolen credit card to order your item, while the money from the listing is almost all profit for the scammer.
Instagram influencer scams
Someone will message you on Instagram asking you to promote their products, and offering you a discount code. The items are Chinese junk, and the offer is made to many people at a time.
Cheap Items
Many websites pop up and offer expensive products, including electronics, clothes, watches, sunglasses, and shoes at very low prices. The scam: Some sites are selling cheap knock-offs. Some will just take your money and run. What to do if you think you're involved with this scam: Contact your bank or credit card and dispute the charge. How to avoid: The sites often have every brand-name shoe or fashion item (Air Jordan, Yeezy, Gucci, etc) in stock and often at a discounted price. The site will claim to be an outlet for a major brand or even a specific line or item. The site will have images at the bottom claiming to be Secured by Norton or various official payment processors but not actual links. The site will have poor grammar and a mish-mash of categories. Recently, established websites will get hacked or their domain name jacked and turned into scam stores, meaning the domain name of the store will be completely unrelated to the items they're selling. If the deal sounds too good to be true it probably is. Nobody is offering brand new iPhones or Beats or Nintendo Switches for 75% off.
Cheap Amazon 3rd Party Items
You're on Amazon or maybe just Googling for an item and you see it for an unbelievable price from a third-party seller. You know Amazon has your back so you order it. The scam: One of three things usually happen: 1) The seller marks the items as shipped and sends a fake tracking number. Amazon releases the funds to the seller, and the seller disappears. Amazon ultimately refunds your money. 2) The seller immediately cancels the order and instructs you to re-order the item directly from their website, usually with the guarantee that the order is still protected by Amazon. The seller takes your money and runs. Amazon informs you that they do not offer protection on items sold outside of Amazon and cannot help you. 2) The seller immediately cancels the order and instructs you to instead send payment via an unused Amazon gift card by sending the code on the back via email. Once the seller uses the code, the money on the card is gone and cannot be refunded. How to avoid: These scammers can be identified by looking at their Amazon storefronts. They'll be brand new sellers offering a wide range of items at unbelievable prices. Usually their Amazon names will be gibberish, or a variation on FIRSTNAME.LASTNAME. Occasionally however, established storefronts will be hacked. If the deal is too good to be true its most likely a scam.
Scams on eBay
There are scams on eBay targeting both buyers and sellers. As a seller, you should look out for people who privately message you regarding the order, especially if they ask you to ship to a different address or ask to negotiate via text/email/a messaging service. As a buyer you should look out for new accounts selling in-demand items, established accounts selling in-demand items that they have no previous connection to (you can check their feedback history for a general idea of what they bought/sold in the past), and lookout for people who ask you to go off eBay and use another service to complete the transaction. In many cases you will receive a fake tracking number and your money will be help up for up to a month.
Scams on Amazon
There are scams on Amazon targeting both buyers and sellers. As a seller, you should look out for people who message you about a listing. As a buyer you should look out for listings that have an email address for you to contact the person to complete the transaction, and you should look out for cheap listings of in-demand items.
Scams on Reddit
Reddit accounts are frequently purchased and sold by fraudsters who wish to use the high karma count + the age of the account to scam people on buy/sell subreddits. You need to take precautions and be safe whenever you are making a transaction online.
Computer scams
Virus scam
A popup or other ad will say that you have a virus and you need to follow their advice in order to remove it. They are lying, and either want you to install malware or pay for their software.

Assorted scams

Chinese Brushing / direct shipping
If you have ever received an unsolicited small package from China, your address was used to brush. Vendors place fake orders for their own products and send out the orders so that they can increase their ratings.
Money flipping
Scammer claims to be a banking insider who can double/triple/bazoople any amount of money you send them, with no consequences of any kind. Obviously, the money disappears into their wallet the moment you send it.

Door to door scams

As a general rule, you should not engage with door to door salesmen. If you are interested in the product they are selling, check online first.
Selling Magazines
Someone or a group will come to your door and offer to sell a magazine subscription. Often the subscriptions are not for the duration or price you were told, and the magazines will often have tough or impossible cancellation policies.
Energy sales
Somebody will come to your door claiming to be from an energy company. They will ask to see your current energy bill so that they can see how much you pay. They will then offer you a discount if you sign up with them, and promise to handle everything with your old provider. Some of these scammers will "slam" you, by using your account number that they saw on your bill to switch you to their service without authorization, and some will scam you by charging higher prices than the ones you agreed on.
Security system scams
Scammers will come to your door and ask about your security system, and offer to sell you a new one. These scammers are either selling you overpriced low quality products, or are casing your home for a future burglary.
They ask to enter your home
While trying to sell you whatever, they suddenly need to use your bathroom, or they've been writing against the wall and ask to use your table instead. Or maybe they just moved into the neighborhood and want to see how you decorate for ideas.
They're scoping out you and your place. They want to see what valuables you have, how gullible you are, if you have a security system or dogs, etc.

Street scams

Begging With a Purpose
"I just need a few more dollars for the bus," at the bus station, or "I just need $5 to get some gas," at a gas station. There's also a variation where you will be presented with a reward: "I just need money for a cab to get uptown, but I'll give you sports tickets/money/a date/a priceless vase."
Three Card Monte, Also Known As The Shell Game
Unbeatable. The people you see winning are in on the scam.
Drop and Break
You bump into someone and they drop their phone/glasses/fancy bottle of wine/priceless vase and demand you pay them back. In reality, it's a $2 pair of reading glasses/bottle of three-buck-chuck/tasteful but affordable vase.
CD Sales
You're handed a free CD so you can check out the artist's music. They then ask for your name and immediately write it on the CD. Once they've signed your name, they ask you for money, saying they can't give it to someone else now. Often they use dry erase markers, or cheap CD sleeves. Never use any type of storage device given to you by a random person, as the device can contain malware.
White Van Speaker Scam
You're approached and offered speakers/leather jackets/other luxury goods at a discount. The scammer will have an excuse as to why the price is so low. After you buy them, you'll discover that they are worthless.
iPhone Street Sale
You're approached and shown an iPhone for sale, coming in the box, but it's open and you can see the phone. If you buy the phone, you'll get an iPhone box with no iPhone, just some stones or cheap metal in it to weigh it down.
Buddhist Monk Pendant
A monk in traditional garb approaches you, hands you a gold trinket, and asks for a donation. He holds either a notebook with names and amounts of donation (usually everyone else has donated $5+), or a leaflet with generic info. This is fairly common in NYC, and these guys get aggressive quickly.
Friendship Bracelet Scam More common in western Europe, you're approached by someone selling bracelets. They quickly wrap a loop of fabric around your finger and pull it tight, starting to quickly weave a bracelet. The only way to (easily) get it off your hand is to pay. Leftover sales
This scam involves many different items, but the idea is usually the same: you are approached by someone who claims to have a large amount of excess inventory and offers to sell it to you at a great price. The scammer actually has low quality items and will lie to you about the price/origin of the items.
Dent repair scams
Scammers will approach you in public about a dent in your car and offer to fix it for a low price. Often they will claim that they are mechanics. They will not fix the dent in your car, but they will apply large amounts of wax or other substances to hide the dent while they claim that the substance requires time to harden.
Gold ring/jewelry/valuable item scam
A scammer will "find" a gold ring or other valuable item and offers to sell it to you. The item is fake and you will never see the scammer again.
Distraction theft
One person will approach you and distract you, while their accomplice picks your pockets. The distraction can take many forms, but if you are a tourist and are approached in public, watch closely for people getting close to you.

General resources

Site to report scams in the United Kingdom: http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/
Site to report scams in the United States: https://www.ic3.gov/default.aspx
Site to report scams in Canada: www.antifraudcentre-centreantifraude.ca/reportincident-signalerincident/index-eng.htm
Site to report scams in Europe: https://www.europol.europa.eu/report-a-crime/report-cybercrime-online
FTC scam alerts: https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/scam-alerts
Microsoft's anti-scam guide: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/safety/online-privacy/avoid-phone-scams.aspx
https://www.usa.gov/common-scams-frauds
https://www.usa.gov/scams-and-frauds
https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/features/scam-alerts
https://www.fbi.gov/scams-and-safety/common-fraud-schemes
submitted by EugeneBYMCMB to Scams [link] [comments]

/r/Scams Common Scam Master Post

fHello visitors and subscribers of scams! Here you will find a master list of common (and uncommon) scams that you may find online or in real life. A big thanks to the many contributors who helped create this thread.

If you know of a scam that is not covered here, write a comment and I'll add it.

Here is the last version of this thread. Here is the previous version of this thread from 2018, here is the previous version of this thread from 2017, and here is the previous version of this thread from 2016.
Some of these articles are from small, local publications and refer to the scam happening in a specific area. Do not think that this means that the scam won't happen in your area.
The fake check scam (Credit to nimble2 for this part)
The fake check scam arises from many different situations (for instance, you applied for a job, or you are selling something on a place like Craigslist, or someone wants to purchase goods or services from your business, or you were offered a job as a mystery shopper, you were asked to wrap your car with an advertisement, or you received a check in the mail for no reason), but the bottom line is always something like this:
General fraudulent funds scams If somebody is asking you to accept and send out money as a favour or as part of a job, it is a fraudulent funds scam. It does not matter how they pay you, any payment on any service can be fraudulent and will be reversed when it is discovered to be fraudulent.
Phone verification code scams Someone will ask you to receive a verification text and then tell you to give them the code. Usually the code will come from Google Voice, or from Craigslist. In the Google version of the scam, your phone number will be used to verify a Google Voice account that the scammer will use to scam people with. In the Craigslist version of the scam, your phone number will be used to verify a Craigslist posting that the scammer will use to scam people. There is also an account takeover version of this scam that will involve the scammer sending a password reset token to your phone number and asking you for it.
Bitcoin job scams
Bitcoin job scams involve some sort of fraudulent funds transfer, usually a fake check although a fraudulent bank transfer can be used as well. The scammer will send you the fraudulent money and ask you to purchase bitcoins. This is a scam, and you will have zero recourse after you send the scammer bitcoins.
Email flooding
If you suddenly receive hundreds or thousands of spam emails, usually subscription confirmations, it's very likely that one of your online accounts has been taken over and is being used fraudulently. You should check any of your accounts that has a credit card linked to it, preferably from a computer other than the one you normally use. You should change all of your passwords to unique passwords and you should start using two factor authentication everywhere.
Boss/CEO scam A scammer will impersonate your boss or someone who works at your company and will ask you to run an errand for them, which will usually be purchasing gift cards and sending them the code. Once the scammer has the code, you have no recourse.
Employment certification scams
You will receive a job offer that is dependent on you completing a course or receiving a certification from a company the scammer tells you about. The scammer operates both websites and the job does not exist.
Craigslist fake payment scams
Scammers will ask you about your item that you have listed for sale on a site like Craigslist, and will ask to pay you via Paypal. They are scamming you, and the payment in most cases does not actually exist, the email you received was sent by the scammers. In cases where you have received a payment, the scammer can dispute the payment or the payment may be entirely fraudulent. The scammer will then either try to get you to send money to them using the fake funds that they did not send to you, or will ask you to ship the item, usually to a re-shipping facility or a parcel mule.
General fraudulent funds scams The fake check scam is not the only scam that involves accepting fraudulent/fake funds and purchasing items for scammers. If your job or opportunity involves accepting money and then using that money, it is almost certainly a frauduent funds scam. Even if the payment is through a bank transfer, Paypal, Venmo, Zelle, Interac e-Transfer, etc, it does not matter.
Credit card debt scam
Fraudsters will offer to pay off your bills, and will do so with fraudulent funds. Sometimes it will be your credit card bill, but it can be any bill that can be paid online. Once they pay it off, they will ask you to send them money or purchase items for them. The fraudulent transaction will be reversed in the future and you will never be able to keep the money. This scam happens on sites like Craigslist, Twitter, Instagram, and also some dating sites, including SeekingArrangement.
The parcel mule scam
A scammer will contact you with a job opportunity that involves accepting and reshipping packages. The packages are either stolen or fraudulently obtained items, and you will not be paid by the scammer. Here is a news article about a scam victim who fell for this scam and reshipped over 20 packages containing fraudulently acquired goods.
The Skype sex scam
You're on Facebook and you get a friend request from a cute girl you've never met. She wants to start sexting and trading nudes. She'll ask you to send pictures or videos or get on webcam where she can see you naked with your face in the picture. The scam: There's no girl. You've sent nudes to a guy pretending to be a girl. As soon as he has the pictures he'll demand money and threaten to send the pictures to your friends and family. Sometimes the scammer will upload the video to a porn site or Youtube to show that they are serious.
What to do if you are a victim of this scam: You cannot buy silence, you can only rent it. Paying the blackmailer will show them that the information they have is valuable and they will come after you for more money. Let your friends and family know that you were scammed and tell them to ignore friend requests or messages from people they don't know. Also, make sure your privacy settings are locked down and consider deactivating your account.
The underage girl scam
You're on a dating site or app and you get contacted by a cute girl. She wants to start sexting and trading nudes. Eventually she stops communicating and you get a call from a pissed off guy claiming to be the girl's father, or a police officer, or a private investigator, or something else along those lines. Turns out the girl you were sexting is underage, and her parents want some money for various reasons, such as to pay for a new phone, to pay for therapy, etc. There is, of course, no girl. You were communicating with a scammer.
What to do if you are a victim of this scam: Stop picking up the phone when the scammers call. Do not pay them, or they will be after you for more money.
Phishing
Phishing is when a scammer tries to trick you into giving information to them, such as your password or private financial information. Phishing messages will usually look very similar to official messages, and sometimes they are identical. If you are ever required to login to a different account in order to use a service, you should be incredibly cautious.
The blackmail email scam The exact wording of the emails varies, but there are generally four main parts. They claim to have placed software/malware on a porn/adult video site, they claim to have a video of you masturbating or watching porn, they threaten to release the video to your friends/family/loved ones/boss/dog, and they demand that you pay them in order for them to delete the video. Rest assured that this is a very common spam campaign and there is no truth behind the email or the threats. Here are some news articles about this scam.
The blackmail mail scam
This is very similar to the blackmail email scam, but you will receive a letter in the mail.
Rental scams Usually on local sites like Craigslist, scammers will steal photos from legitimate real estate listings and will list them for rent at or below market rate. They will generally be hesitant to tell you the address of the property for "safety reasons" and you will not be able to see the unit. They will then ask you to pay them a deposit and they claim they will ship you the keys. In reality, your money is gone and you will have no recourse.
Craigslist vehicle scams A scammer will list a vehicle on Craigslist and will offer to ship you the car. In many cases they will also falsely claim to sell you the car through eBay or Amazon. If you are looking for a car on Craigslist and the seller says anything about shipping the car, having an agent, gives you a long story about why they are selling the car, or the listing price is far too low, you are talking to a scammer and you should ignore and move on.
Advance-fee scam, also known as the 419 scam, or the Nigerian prince scam. You will receive a communication from someone who claims that you are entitled to a large sum of money, or you can help them obtain a large sum of money. However, they will need money from you before you receive the large sum.
Man in the middle scams
Man in the middle scams are very common and very hard to detect. The scammer will impersonate a company or person you are legitimately doing business with, and they will ask you to send the money to one of their own bank accounts or one controlled by a money mule. They have gained access to the legitimate persons email address, so there will be nothing suspicious about the email. To prevent this, make contact in a different way that lets you verify that the person you are talking to is the person you think you are talking to.
Cam girl voting/viewer scam
You will encounter a "cam girl" on a dating/messaging/social media/whatever site/app, and the scammer will ask you to go to their site and sign up with your credit card. They may offer a free show, or ask you to vote for them, or any number of other fake stories.
Amateur porn recruitment scam
You will encounter a "pornstar" on a dating/messaging/social media/whatever site/app, and the scammer will ask you to create an adult film with hehim, but first you need to do something. The story here is usually something to do with verifying your age, or you needing to take an STD test that involves sending money to a site operated by the scammer.
Hot girl SMS spam
You receive a text from a random number with a message along the lines of "Hey babe I'm here in town again if you wanted to meet up this time, are you around?" accompanied by a NSFW picture of a hot girl. It's spam, and they'll direct you to their scam website that requires a credit card.
Identity verification scam
You will encounter someone on a dating/messaging/social media/whatever site/app, and the scammer will ask that you verify your identity as they are worried about catfishing. The scammer operates the site, and you are not talking to whoever you think you are talking to.
This type of scam teases you with something, then tries to make you sign up for something else that costs money. The company involved is often innocent, but they turn a blind eye to the practice as it helps their bottom line, even if they have to occasionally issue refunds. A common variation takes place on dating sites/dating apps, where you will match with someone who claims to be a camgirl who wants you to sign up for a site and vote for her. Another variation takes place on local sites like Craigslist, where the scammers setup fake rental scams and demand that you go through a specific service for a credit check. Once you go through with it, the scammer will stop talking to you. Another variation also takes place on local sites like Craigslist, where scammers will contact you while you are selling a car and will ask you to purchase a Carfax-like report from a specific website.
Multi Level Marketing or Affiliate Marketing
You apply for a vague job listing for 'sales' on craigslist. Or maybe an old friend from high school adds you on Facebook and says they have an amazing business opportunity for you. Or maybe the well dressed guy who's always interviewing people in the Starbucks that you work at asks if you really want to be slinging coffee the rest of your life. The scam: MLMs are little more than pyramid schemes. They involve buying some sort of product (usually snake oil health products like body wraps or supplements) and shilling them to your friends and family. They claim that the really money is recruiting people underneath you who give you a slice of whatever they sell. And if those people underneath you recruit more people, you get a piece of their sales. Ideally if you big enough pyramid underneath you the money will roll in without any work on your part. Failure to see any profit will be your fault for not "wanting it enough." The companies will claim that you need to buy their extra training modules or webinars to really start selling. But in reality, the vast majority of people who buy into a MLM won't see a cent. At the end of the day all you'll be doing is annoying your friends and family with your constant recruitment efforts. What to look out for: Recruiters love to be vague. They won't tell you the name of the company or what exactly the job will entail. They'll pump you up with promises of "self-generating income", "being your own boss", and "owning your own company." They might ask you to read books about success and entrepreneurs. They're hoping you buy into the dream first. If you get approached via social media, check their timelines. MLMs will often instruct their victims to pretend that they've already made it. They'll constantly post about how they're hustling and making the big bucks and linking to youtube videos about success. Again, all very vague about what their job actually entails. If you think you're being recruited: Ask them what exactly the job is. If they can't answer its probably a MLM. Just walk away.

Phone scams

Tax Call
You get a call from somebody claiming to be from your countries tax agency. They say you have unpaid taxes that need to be paid immediately, and you may be arrested or have other legal action taken against you if it is not paid. This scam has caused the American IRS, Canadian CRA, British HMRC, and Australian Tax Office to issue warnings. This scam happens in a wide variety of countries all over the world.
Warrant Call
Very similar to the tax call. You'll get a phone call from an "agent", "officer", "sheriff", or other law enforcement officer claiming that there is a warrant out for your arrest and you will be arrested very soon. They will then offer to settle everything for a fee, usually paid in giftcards.
[Legal Documents/Process Server Calls]
Very similar to the warrant call. You'll get a phone call from a scammer claiming that they are going to serve you legal documents, and they will threaten you with legal consequences if you refuse to comply. They may call themselves "investigators", and will sometimes give you a fake case number.
Student Loan Forgiveness Scam
Scammers will call you and tell you about a student loan forgiveness program, but they are interested in obtaining private information about you or demanding money in order to join the fake program.
Tech Support Call You receive a call from someone with a heavy accent claiming to be a technician Microsoft or your ISP. They inform you that your PC has a virus and your online banking and other accounts may be compromised if the virus is not removed. They'll have you type in commands and view diagnostics on your PC which shows proof of the virus. Then they'll have you install remote support software so the technician can work on your PC, remove the virus, and install security software. The cost of the labor and software can be hundreds of dollars. The scam: There's no virus. The technician isn't a technician and does not work for Microsoft or your ISP. Scammers (primarily out of India) use autodialers to cold-call everyone in the US. Any file they point out to you or command they have you run is completely benign. The software they sell you is either freeware or ineffective. What to do you if you're involved with this scam: If the scammers are remotely on your computer as you read this, turn off your PC or laptop via the power button immediately, and then if possible unplug your internet connection. Some of the more vindictive tech scammers have been known to create boot passwords on your computer if they think you've become wise to them and aren't going to pay up. Hang up on the scammers, block the number, and ignore any threats about payment. Performing a system restore on your PC is usually all that is required to remove the scammer's common remote access software. Reports of identity theft from fake tech calls are uncommon, but it would still be a good idea to change your passwords for online banking and monitor your accounts for any possible fraud. How to avoid: Ignore any calls claiming that your PC has a virus. Microsoft will never contact you. If you're unsure if a call claiming to be from your ISP is legit, hang up, and then dial the customer support number listed on a recent bill. If you have elderly relatives or family that isn't tech savvy, take the time to fill them in on this scam.
Chinese government scam
This scam is aimed at Chinese people living in Europe and North America, and involves a voicemail from someone claiming to be associated with the Chinese government, usually through the Chinese consulate/embassy, who is threatening legal action or making general threats.
Chinese shipping scam
This scam is similar to the Chinese government scam, but involves a seized/suspicious package, and the scammers will connect the victim to other scammers posing as Chinese government investigators.
Social security suspension scam
You will receive a call from someone claiming to work for the government regarding suspicious activity, fraud, or serious crimes connected to your social security number. You'll be asked to speak to an operator and the operator will explain the steps you need to follow in order to fix the problems. It's all a scam, and will lead to you losing money and could lead to identity theft if you give them private financial information.
Utilities cutoff
You get a call from someone who claims that they are from your utility company, and they claim that your utilities will be shut off unless you immediately pay. The scammer will usually ask for payment via gift cards, although they may ask for payment in other ways, such as Western Union or bitcoin.
Relative in custody Scammer claims to be the police, and they have your son/daughtenephew/estranged twin in custody. You need to post bail (for some reason in iTunes gift cards or MoneyGram) immediately or the consequences will never be the same.
Mexican family scam
This scam comes in many different flavours, but always involves someone in your family and Mexico. Sometimes the scammer will claim that your family member has been detained, sometimes the scammer will claim that your family member has been kidnapped, and sometimes the scammer will claim that your family member is injured and needs help.
General family scams
Scammers will gather a large amount of information about you and target your family members using different stories with the goal of gettimg them to send money.
One ring scam
Scammers may call you from an international number with the goal of getting you to return their call, incurring expensive calling fees.

Online shopping scams

THE GOLDEN RULE OF ONLINE SHOPPING: If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.
Dropshipping
An ad on reddit or social media sites like Facebook and Instagram offers items at huge discounts or even free (sometimes requiring you to reblog or like their page). They just ask you to pay shipping. The scam: The item will turn out to be very low quality and will take weeks or even months to arrive. Sometimes the item never arrives, and the store disappears or stops responding. The seller drop-ships the item from China. The item may only cost a few dollars, and the Chinese government actually pays for the shipping. You end up paying $10-$15 dollars for a $4 item, with the scammer keeping the profit. If you find one of these scams but really have your heart set on the item, you can find it on AliExpress or another Chinese retailer.
Triangulation fraud
Triangulation fraud occurs when you make a purchase on a site like Amazon or eBay for an item at a lower than market price, and receive an item that was clearly purchased new at full price. The scammer uses a stolen credit card to order your item, while the money from the listing is almost all profit for the scammer.
Instagram influencer scams
Someone will message you on Instagram asking you to promote their products, and offering you a discount code. The items are Chinese junk, and the offer is made to many people at a time.
Cheap Items
Many websites pop up and offer expensive products, including electronics, clothes, watches, sunglasses, and shoes at very low prices. The scam: Some sites are selling cheap knock-offs. Some will just take your money and run. What to do if you think you're involved with this scam: Contact your bank or credit card and dispute the charge. How to avoid: The sites often have every brand-name shoe or fashion item (Air Jordan, Yeezy, Gucci, etc) in stock and often at a discounted price. The site will claim to be an outlet for a major brand or even a specific line or item. The site will have images at the bottom claiming to be Secured by Norton or various official payment processors but not actual links. The site will have poor grammar and a mish-mash of categories. Recently, established websites will get hacked or their domain name jacked and turned into scam stores, meaning the domain name of the store will be completely unrelated to the items they're selling. If the deal sounds too good to be true it probably is. Nobody is offering brand new iPhones or Beats or Nintendo Switches for 75% off.
Cheap Amazon 3rd Party Items
You're on Amazon or maybe just Googling for an item and you see it for an unbelievable price from a third-party seller. You know Amazon has your back so you order it. The scam: One of three things usually happen: 1) The seller marks the items as shipped and sends a fake tracking number. Amazon releases the funds to the seller, and the seller disappears. Amazon ultimately refunds your money. 2) The seller immediately cancels the order and instructs you to re-order the item directly from their website, usually with the guarantee that the order is still protected by Amazon. The seller takes your money and runs. Amazon informs you that they do not offer protection on items sold outside of Amazon and cannot help you. 2) The seller immediately cancels the order and instructs you to instead send payment via an unused Amazon gift card by sending the code on the back via email. Once the seller uses the code, the money on the card is gone and cannot be refunded. How to avoid: These scammers can be identified by looking at their Amazon storefronts. They'll be brand new sellers offering a wide range of items at unbelievable prices. Usually their Amazon names will be gibberish, or a variation on FIRSTNAME.LASTNAME. Occasionally however, established storefronts will be hacked. If the deal is too good to be true its most likely a scam.
Scams on eBay
There are scams on eBay targeting both buyers and sellers. As a seller, you should look out for people who privately message you regarding the order, especially if they ask you to ship to a different address or ask to negotiate via text/email/a messaging service. As a buyer you should look out for new accounts selling in-demand items, established accounts selling in-demand items that they have no previous connection to (you can check their feedback history for a general idea of what they bought/sold in the past), and lookout for people who ask you to go off eBay and use another service to complete the transaction. In many cases you will receive a fake tracking number and your money will be help up for up to a month.
Scams on Amazon
There are scams on Amazon targeting both buyers and sellers. As a seller, you should look out for people who message you about a listing. As a buyer you should look out for listings that have an email address for you to contact the person to complete the transaction, and you should look out for cheap listings of in-demand items.
Scams on Reddit
Reddit accounts are frequently purchased and sold by fraudsters who wish to use the high karma count + the age of the account to scam people on buy/sell subreddits. You need to take precautions and be safe whenever you are making a transaction online.
Computer scams
Virus scam
A popup or other ad will say that you have a virus and you need to follow their advice in order to remove it. They are lying, and either want you to install malware or pay for their software.

Assorted scams

Chinese Brushing / direct shipping
If you have ever received an unsolicited small package from China, your address was used to brush. Vendors place fake orders for their own products and send out the orders so that they can increase their ratings.
Money flipping
Scammer claims to be a banking insider who can double/triple/bazoople any amount of money you send them, with no consequences of any kind. Obviously, the money disappears into their wallet the moment you send it.

Door to door scams

As a general rule, you should not engage with door to door salesmen. If you are interested in the product they are selling, check online first.
Selling Magazines
Someone or a group will come to your door and offer to sell a magazine subscription. Often the subscriptions are not for the duration or price you were told, and the magazines will often have tough or impossible cancellation policies.
Energy sales
Somebody will come to your door claiming to be from an energy company. They will ask to see your current energy bill so that they can see how much you pay. They will then offer you a discount if you sign up with them, and promise to handle everything with your old provider. Some of these scammers will "slam" you, by using your account number that they saw on your bill to switch you to their service without authorization, and some will scam you by charging higher prices than the ones you agreed on.
They ask you to donate $1
After you decline to buy a subscription, they ask you to donate a small sum of money. Your mind goes "I guess it's only $1" or "if that's what it takes for them to go away".
Security system scams
Scammers will come to your door and ask about your security system, and offer to sell you a new one. These scammers are either selling you overpriced low quality products, or are casing your home for a future burglary.
They ask to enter your home
While trying to sell you whatever, they suddenly need to use your bathroom, or they've been writing against the wall and ask to use your table instead. Or maybe they just moved into the neighborhood and want to see how you decorate for ideas.
They're scoping out you and your place. They want to see what valuables you have, how gullible you are, if you have a security system or dogs, etc.

Street scams

Begging With a Purpose
"I just need a few more dollars for the bus," at the bus station, or "I just need $5 to get some gas," at a gas station. There's also a variation where you will be presented with a reward: "I just need money for a cab to get uptown, but I'll give you sports tickets/money/a date/a priceless vase."
Three Card Monte, Also Known As The Shell Game
Unbeatable. The people you see winning are in on the scam.
Drop and Break
You bump into someone and they drop their phone/glasses/fancy bottle of wine/priceless vase and demand you pay them back. In reality, it's a $2 pair of reading glasses/bottle of three-buck-chuck/tasteful but affordable vase.
CD Sales
You're handed a free CD so you can check out the artist's music. They then ask for your name and immediately write it on the CD. Once they've signed your name, they ask you for money, saying they can't give it to someone else now. Often they use dry erase markers, or cheap CD sleeves. Never use any type of storage device given to you by a random person, as the device can contain malware.
White Van Speaker Scam
You're approached and offered speakers/leather jackets/other luxury goods at a decent discount. The scammer will claim they ordered too many, their store closed, they need to avoid customs fees, or they need money quick. After you buy them, you'll discover that they are worthless.
iPhone Street Sale
You're approached and shown an iPhone for sale, coming in the box, but it's open and you can see the phone. If you buy the phone, you'll get an iPhone box with no iPhone, just some stones or cheap metal in it to weigh it down.
Buddhist Monk Pendant
A monk in traditional garb approaches you, hands you a gold trinket, and asks for a donation. He holds either a notebook with names and amounts of donation (usually everyone else has donated $5+), or a leaflet with generic info. This is fairly common in NYC, and these guys get aggressive quickly.
Sports Team Donations
You're approached by teens with a clipboard with a letter from their high school about how they need to gather donations for their upcoming seasons to buy new uniforms/equipment/priceless vases. No high school is sending their students into the subway to get pocket change.
Friendship Bracelet Scam More common in western Europe, you're approached by someone selling bracelets. They quickly wrap a loop of fabric around your finger and pull it tight, starting to quickly weave a bracelet. The only way to (easily) get it off your hand is to pay. Leftover sales
This scam involves many different items, but the idea is usually the same: you are approached by someone who claims to have a large amount of excess inventory and offers to sell it to you at a great price. The scammer actually has low quality items and will lie to you about the price/origin of the items.
Dent repair scams
Scammers will approach you in public about a dent in your car and offer to fix it for a low price. Often they will claim that they are mechanics. They will not fix the dent in your car, but they will apply large amounts of wax or other substances to hide the dent while they claim that the substance requires time to harden.
Gold ring/jewelry/valuable item scam
A scammer will "find" a gold ring or other valuable item and offers to sell it to you. The item is fake and you will never see the scammer again.
Distraction theft
One person will approach you and distract you, while their accomplice picks your pockets. The distraction can take many forms, but if you are a tourist and are approached in public, watch closely for people getting close to you.

General resources

Site to report scams in the United Kingdom: http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/
Site to report scams in the United States: https://www.ic3.gov/default.aspx
Site to report scams in Canada: www.antifraudcentre-centreantifraude.ca/reportincident-signalerincident/index-eng.htm
Site to report scams in Europe: https://www.europol.europa.eu/report-a-crime/report-cybercrime-online
FTC scam alerts: https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/scam-alerts
Microsoft's anti-scam guide: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/safety/online-privacy/avoid-phone-scams.aspx
https://www.usa.gov/common-scams-frauds
https://www.usa.gov/scams-and-frauds
https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/features/scam-alerts
https://www.fbi.gov/scams-and-safety/common-fraud-schemes
submitted by EugeneBYMCMB to Scams [link] [comments]

Fatum, vol. 1 [Chapters 6 - 8]

Chapter 0, Chapter 1, Chapters 2,3, Chapter 4 - 5.4
Chapter 6
One of the main reasons suicide is so upsetting for people is because of finances. Dying is really quite expensive from burials to funerals, to receptions; then there are the accessories that come with death: having your corpse beautified, the nice wooden bed they make to lower your body into the ground, and the cute stone head that has your date of birth, date of death, and name on it. And someone has to get paid decently for these things, as dealing with dead bodies can be troublesome for a lot of people. So these expenses add up, and when you kill yourself you tack on a slew of unexpected debts that someone will have to pay for, it just won’t be you. He chose to treat his death a little differently.
At her workstation, Bell has a distinct coldness in her voice. She swivels around in her chair absent-mindedly, half- heartedly hoping that somehow an Earthly force would relieve her of these arbitrary responsibilities. She begins to space out, as So Many Details by Toro Y Moi blasts off of her Alexa. Revisiting her past life before meeting Him, she remembers always being curious about exploring the world and getting to learn more about how the human mind worked in a collective form. Their first meeting was one where she found herself unable to reign in her curiosity. Even during His prepubescent years, He was clearly the master of His own universe, figuratively, and she picked up on this immediately. They spent the entire night, until their bedtimes at least, getting to know one another. Finding and appreciating both similarities and differences right off the bat probably had a lot to do with the relationship they shared.
But Bell’s existence was also necessary. Although she is blissfully unaware, her companionship with Him is what sparked His deep dive into answers for reasons of existence. She holds herself morally and emotionally liable for His suicide, consistently flashing back to the last words she said to him while he was alive:
““You never loved me, if you do this, you could have never loved me.””
Thinking aloud, startled by the sound of emotion in her own voice,
“So stupid. I’m so stupid. He tells me this is His last day on Earth and I immediately tried to emotionally blackmail him. He really prepared all of us for His departure, but I was never ready to let Him go. I still am not ready, but I know He loved me and I loved Him so I will follow His final instructions. Alexa, activate Protocol Stardust.”
“Searching... Protocol Stardust located. My condolences, Bell.”
“Thanks Alexa but He recommended I turn down condolences. He never wanted people to be sad over His death...”
“Protocol Stardust... 10% Loaded.”
“I just really can’t believe it’s actually happening. I would make a bad habit of indulging with Him in His laughter when we talked about it.”
“Protocol Stardust... 30% Loaded.”
“I mean, who thinks like that? Who even jokes like that? To have your body cremated is one thing, but then to have your ashes spread out into space?”
“Protocol Stardust... 50% Loaded.”
“And then the Bastard went and accommodated Himself. Every time someone would mention the implausibility of His plan He was so calmly confident He would be able to achieve it before His last day.”
“Protocol Stardust... 70% Loaded.”
“Of course He succeeded. All of our fates were sealed when He talked his mom into getting him his first Raspberry Pi. He cashed out in cryptocurrency and had been living on His own time ever since, like some character out of a movie.”
“Protocol Stardust... 99% Loaded.”
“I miss you so much.”
“Protocol Stardust Ready to Execute. Please Provide Final Voice Confirmation.”
The glass finish on her iPhone X felt impossibly smooth in her palm. She chuckled to herself slightly, thinking back to when the iPhone X was first announced and how He had lost His cool that Apple stole the aesthetic from his niche YouTube channel to market the new phone. She knew no one would believe Him, but she genuinely did. She was right to, because maybe they did, but now it seemed like an even greater injustice against His reality that she didn’t fight harder. It wouldn’t have been what He wanted anyway. She positions her phone's camera to catch enough of her facial profile to utilize Face ID. Gently tapping the screen with her thumb, as if to nudge the device awake, the screen glows bright yellow with the custom parallax wallpaper He had designed for her. The text was placed perfect center, reading out ‘“DEATH IS ARTIFICIAL”, with a 1 px fill line striking through the circle of letters, highlighting a hidden message: ‘”DEATH IS ART’”.
Chapter 7
“I can’t believe this shit.”
“Honey, relax. You know He’ll make you whole.”
“Please don’t refer to Him and holes in the same sentence.”
“You're being immature. I know it’s still touchy.”
“I really didn’t think it would bother me as much as it does. I love Him but He takes it too far.”
Blood recirculating into his wrists, Ohsa rubs them gently with his index and middle fingers to soothe himself, because of both the grueling discomfort he had just endured and because of his own doubts if his Friend would be okay.
“Thank goodness you reminded me we were out of pesto sauce. Who knows what would’ve happened if He saw me.”
“What’s that supposed to mean?”
“It means he could’ve tied both of us up and left us here.”
“Oh.”
“This is the last time I go through this: I was down with the orgy but as soon as He got close to me my senses were completely overwhelmed. His words felt like silk flowing into my ears, and the way He smelled – my God His smell,”
“...You said you had felt like you had become a different person.”
Catching herself she resumes, “Yes but no. Now that I think about it, it wasn’t that I was a different person. I was still me, completely me, rolling me, but He was just purely irresistible in that moment. Whoever slept with Him, though, was not the woman that loves you.”
“How do I know you’re not lying?”
“Because I’m trying to communicate with you about it, as opposed to shifting blame. Listen honey, He fucked the shit out of me in the middle of an orgy of people. I can’t stand here and pretend like it didn’t happen or I didn’t enjoy it or I had been so drugged up I didn’t know what I was doing. But when it happened it did, and I was there.”
“What the fuck. I can’t think about this right now. What the hell happened out there? I felt two separate explosions while I was tied up.”
“He destroyed the elevator shaft and the entire left side of the hallway, including part of the door to the stairway. My Twitter Moments feed is saying at least 4 SWAT officers are reported to be in critical condition.”
“What is He thinking?! How is killing cops supposed to help His cool down??”
“Don’t you think He’s been acting a little too wild lately?”
“I’ve seen Him comeback from worse, honestly.”
“Worse than a killing spree?”
“No, I meant drug-wise.”
“Was He high when you saw him?”
“He was definitely on the comedown. I don’t think He was actively stoned but he wasn’t entirely sober, either.”
“Well, regardless he was clear-headed enough to stay ahead of the cops.”
“Cops are fucking idiots.”
Chapter 8
We never know what the future is until we get there. We like to imagine it as augmented reality everywhere, digital on top of reality, seamlessly intertwined together, persisting without being invasive. The truth is, the future is now. All time, past, present, and future, all exist tangentially and concurrently to each other. The 2008 American Recession hit Bell’s parents where it mattered the most: Their bank accounts. It hit at the least opportune time, right as they were preparing to make a class transition from poverty-level to lower middle class. Not only was their savings obliterated, but their morale too. Maybe this spiritual blow was exactly what she needed, maybe it was another unnecessary inconvenience that came with simply trying to exist as a human, but earlier that year she had her first meeting with Him.
Even as children, Him and Bell always had a special connection. Everyone around them could see as clear as day, that these two were in love, even before they knew it for themselves. Almost a year ago to the day, He had made a discovery. Bitcoin was going to crash, and it was going to crash hard. It was clearly being inflated by whales who were egging on spectators but He correctly assumed that the dramatic rise had gotten way too out of hand for anyone to control. Come end of November under the guise of Christmas spirit he traded all of his leftover Team Fortress 2 hats, convincing other players to complete trades in crypto, tricking those who were ignorant to the true value of BTC. He had already amassed a sizeable enough wallet during His early mining days but that extra week of trading is what took him from safety to comfort.
In literally the exact moment the BTC exchange rate was estimated at $20,500 for one coin, he cashed in his entire wallet of 14,634.14163414 Bitcoin, becoming a multi-millionaire overnight, having earned a net worth just shy of $300 Million USD. He excitedly made his first phone call of the night reaching out to Bell.
“Hey Siri, call Bell.”
“Calling Bell – Mobile”
“Hey, what’s up?”
“Not too much. What’s up with you?”
“Oh nothing, just getting ready for bed. I have work early in the afternoon tomorrow but I want to try to get to the gym in the morning. The only way I won’t be exhausted is if I go to sleep now.”
“Yeah, that's cool. Hypothetically, yeah, if your time wasn’t filled up with working a menial job, what would you do?”
“Honestly I’d love to finish getting my Graduate’s degree, maybe go back to China. I loved my time in Undergrad but it was so tough that I really needed a break. It’s just been so jarring to me how difficult it’s been to get back into academia now that I’m in the real world, you know?”
“OK.”
“What’s up with you? Got some exciting plans for the night? You always have crazy shenanigans under your belt.”
“I swear it just happens to me by accident, but yeah. I’m planning on blowing someone’s mind tonight.”
“Ooh lucky them! What’re you gonna do? A surprise visit? Or buy them a gift? Or is it a secret?”
“It won’t be a secret much longer, I just wanted you to know first.”
“Know what first?”
“I’m filthy rich Bell.”
“What?”
“I’m sitting on a few hundred million dollars.”
“WHAT?”
“What country are you from?”
“What?”
Getting comfortable with his Samuel L. Jackson impersonation, he raises his tone: “’What’ ain’t no country I ever heard of! They speak English in ‘What’?!”
Familiar with the reference but still reeling from the news, Bell plays right into his prank.
“...What?”
“English motherfucker! Do you speak it?!”
“Yes!”
“Then you know what I’m saying?”
“Yes!”
Getting as far as he needed to with the joke, he lets out a boisterous hearty laugh and continues the conversation, back to his usual austere speaking voice.
“Relax, love. Quit your job. Enroll in any school you want. Find a new apartment. Order a mani-pedi to a five star hotel, and then stand up your appointment to go to the casino. Your old life is over.”
Thumb to screen, end call. Before the Phone app can finish spelling out “call ended”, he quickly double taps the home button, finding his Messages app open right behind Notes and Voice Memos. A single text to Bell goes out; to let her know that this is the difference, this is what separates the wheat from the chaff, to let her know that she is now wheat and no longer chaff:
“Painted ultrapure white walls triple coated, a high ceiling, in-wall light fixtures, foliage incorporated into the architecture, soft-close furnishings, and lastly location, location, location.”
Bell takes a moment to read the text. Her mind still, but her heart beating faster, the news truly settling in for the first time. She begins to sob uncontrollably.
submitted by viliscane to libraryofshadows [link] [comments]

Proposal for a marketing campaign which I think would be really cost efficient

First, sorry in advance for all the grammatical errors, English is not my native language. To give my silly username a bit of reputability, I have a masters in marketing and economics and 15+ years business experience.
I've read a few suggestions about the marketing approach on Reddit and here is my take.

"Making videos about NANO and showing its strengths"
I like it in general, but in the end that video will become an AD and ADs always have this fishy scent which users generally don't really like. NANO videos are a cool way to introduce new users to NANO, but I'm not sure if it's cost efficient enough. Myself, I always close ADs because I don't know if it's legit or scam. If I'm an average internet user who isn't into cryptos and I start watching that AD it would most likely sound like Venmo/Paypal to me (especially if this AD was played on the market that has a functioning economy), I don't think I would fully grasp the decentralization advantage of NANO and would end up closing the AD while we as advertisers would end up paying for nothing.

"Litecoin's approach"
Some say that we need Litecoin type of marketing (UFC octagon sticker + NFL clubs accepting Litecoin). While it would be cool to have any type of marketing, I don't think that this type of marketing is financially efficient and we have to be VERY financially efficient because we do not have a treasury fund and we have to rely on our donations which have already proven to be a problem for us. If you check Litecoin's daily confirmed transaction number you will notice that UFC campaign which was few months ago haven't done much if anything at all when it comes to daily transactions number: https://bitinfocharts.com/comparison/litecoin-transactions.html
This type of marketing is expensive and it's not really building the usage of Litecoin since other types of payments work just fine in the USA. Think about going to UFC event and seeing that Litecoin sticker, it has just a subliminal impact (brand awareness building) on people seeing it, but none of those users or a very few will buy Litecoin because of that sticker and even less will use Litecoin in western market after buying it.
With NFL club accepting Litecoin, the same thing, no one or a very few people will buy Litecoin because now you can pay your NFL game ticket with Litecoin. Why making that additional step of buying LTC with fiat to spend it when you can just spend fiat using credit cards which work just fine?!

WHAT I THINK IS WAY MORE EFFICIENT APPROACH AND WHY
My suggestion is that we need to go after daily confirmed transactions numbereal usage of NANO/real world adoption which also means more BUYING PRESSURE on the free market, more demand. Here is how I think we will be the most efficient at it.

First of all I think we need to focus on remittances market in poor country, there is a real usecase for NANO, a real need compared to Litecoin campaign in USA which doesn't really boost usage because no one needs Litecoin at the moment (maybe if USD collapses it will be another story).

Lets use Venezuela for example. The situation there is so bad that people are starving to death. They've literally killed and ate zoo animals a long time ago and now many are eating rotten meat leftovers out of trash cans to survive (yes, it's that bad, check on the Youtube for example https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8MGbyLUCw5k).

Average monthly salary is around 10$ while you need 100$ to survive the month. Many Venezuelans depend on their friends and family members outside of Venezuela who are sending them money to survive. From what I read, most money to Venezuela comes from Colombia and Spain (please correct me if I'm wrong) and since most of them cannot use banks the new remittances business model emerged in Venezuela. Users on social networks who have money and bank accounts in two (Venezuela + Colombia for example) or more countries have started their remittances business offering a remittances service for a FEE. Here is where NANO comes into play to skip this fee and to skip the need to meet with a stranger!
To read more about remittances market in Venezuela, here is the recent answer from Venezuelan itself https://www.reddit.com/btc/comments/cb7qw1/ama_destroying_myths_about_the_use_of/etdpvza/

OK, REMITTANCES IN VENEZUELA, HOW?
As we already figured out, because of economic disaster life is cheap in Venezuela, with 100$ we can feed a person 1 month meaning that also you can get a cheap marketing

Let's target Venezuelans with big social media reach (hundreds of thousands of followers or even millions), make deals with them through NANO center and by using our Venezuelan trusted member and pay them out to do a 4 video campaign (as a package) which would include:
- video of them explaining basic stuff about NANO
- video of them explaining why remittances with NANO (no fee, no intermediary)
- video of them showing the whole remittances process (their friend or relative buying NANO with CC and influencers receiving that NANO within seconds to their phone wallet)
- video of them spending the NANO to buy groceries (I'm sure one of the shops accepting DASH/BTC which are mostly used in Venezuela today will be happy to accept NANO as well)

My guess is that with this approach, we would get many users who would contact their friends and relatives outside Venezuela and ask them to start using NANO for remittances simply because it makes sense and it's more efficient than any other way.

WHY INFLUENCERS AND NOT ADS?

Trust
- As I've already mentioned above, when I see the AD I simply close it and I guess many of you do the same simply because I don't know if it's a scam or not. Influencers have followers who TRUST them which is really important.
Cost efficiency
- I think the ADs are no match to the potential reach we would be getting through influencers for the same amount of money which of course depends on the negotiated price we would be paying for the campaigns.

WHAT'S NEEDED TO START THIS KIND OF CAMPAIGN

1) Reputable intermediary between the community and groundwork deal executor
- Ideally this campaign would go through NANO center which has the reputability to collect our donations.

2) Person from Venezuela
...who is willing to be our extended hand and make us a deal with the influencers. Once the donations are collected NANO center would connect with a NANO member in Venezuela who could then contact suitable influencers and setup the deal. Ideally we would already have a Venezuelan who is a member of NANO center, do we?!

3) Money
How much would this cost? Honestly I have no idea, we would have to ask to find out, but as the situation there is so bad I think the price would be really cost effective to us considering we would be getting REAL ADOPTION which is maybe the biggest NANO's problem at the moment. There is quite a lot of work required from an influencer to do, from recording, video editing to going across the town to spend NANO. We need to be aware of that when negotiating the fair price with influencer. Also we need to pay our Venezuelan connection who would be doing deals with influencers.

4) Scripts
- We would need to create the script for those 4 videos and outline exactly what we want to happen in those videos

5) Influencers
- Research and find potential influencers

6) Metrics
- Along with comments/and likes bellow the campaigned videos, confirmed daily transactions on NANO block lattice type of metric to show us if the campaigns are successful or not would be really helpful. Looks like we don't have it at the moment, the closest is https://nano-faucet.org/stats/ which I find too confusing for my average brain. I know this metric is not the most precise one due to spam but spam usually creates spikes and what we would be looking for is a long term trend line something like red line in this Bitcoin example: http://prntscr.com/oe933nThis is not essential for this campaign, but if someone could build this it would be useful for NANO in general as well.

COULD WE GET SCAMMED?
Yes unfortunately, but we can take a careful approach using milestone payments. Having a really trustworthy Venezuelan connection is the key IMO.

When it comes to influencers, to mitigate a risk of getting scammed we can pay the influencers after every video instead of all at once. Also, our Venezuelan connection will have to explain to the influencer that there is a huge community behind this idea and that they can expect many more campaigns to follow if the first one proves itself to be a success which should help with not getting scammed.

WHAT IS THE END GOAL?

Usage of NANO, adoption!
- Every remittances transaction will create a few more transactions
1 - buy NANO with fiat
2 - send it to Venezuelan friend/relative
3 - Venezuelans spends it to buy food
4 - merchant will eventually have to sell NANO to get more supply or IDEALLY he/we could close the whole circle and find a supplier who would accept NANO himself or some merchants (who can) would be start saving money in NANO due to it's deflationary property.

On top of that people would continue to use it on and on in the future simply because it's the most effective way. Remember that with higher transaction numbers you will eventually get more exposure to media and other users and a bigger value of the network itself. Don't forget, NANO foundation lives from NANO and we need a good NANO price for the team to continue making great updates to the protocol. Also bigger NANO price in USD = more campaigns that we will be able to fund in the future while spending the same amount of NANO.

If this method really is the most cost effective for users I really don't see a reason why those first users who came out of watching influencers videos wouldn't recommend their friends to do the same process for remittances!

Merchants
- If we would be able to get this rolling, many Venezuelans would end up having NANO on their mobile phones, looking where to spend it. They would approach grocery stores and ask to pay with NANO and eventually get us merchants through a simple market demand mechanism. DASH and BTC are mostly used in Venezuela today and we need to thank them for doing the hard work for us introducing merchants to cryptos and having them more likely to accept the more superior payment protocol, NANO.

NEXT STEPS

1) Feedback
I put some thoughts and time into writing this (as I should for holding a lot of NANO), I'll leave it here and first and most important if your feedback because if NANO community in general doesn't like this idea, then it makes no sense to proceed with it since it won't be getting enough funding. With your feedback we can also improve this proposal.

2) NANO center approval + Venezuelan groundworker
If the community likes the idea and the feedback is good we can see what folks from NANO center have to say about it, and to see if we even have a trustworthy Venezuelan member who is willing to make this proposal into a reality.

3) Detailed scripts for videos
- I've mentioned 4 important short videos that I think are all needed for 1 successful campaign so that we offer the followers of those influencers the whole package explaining the whole process and answering "Why NANO?" through those videos (of course his can change if you guys give better idea of what we need from the influencer). Scripts need to be detailed with time stamps explaining exactly what we want inside the videos. If we have a green light from first 2 steps I will start this script building process through Google documents and invite you guys to help me build those.

4) Finding and choosing influencers We can create a topic to find the most suitable influencers in Venezuela, Venezuelan members needs to help us with this!

5) Donations With the community and NANO center behind this proposal, Venezuelan connection ready to do it and scripts ready for the influencers the next step would be to reach into our wallets and donate enough money to be able to fund out first deal.

6) Negotiations, budget building Once the donations start dripping into NANO center's wallet our Venezuelan connection can start reaching out to the chosen influencers and see what's doable with our budget and proceed from there.

7) First campaign Do our first campaign, evaluate it and see if it was cost efficient enough and if yes, improve the whole concept from the experience that we will get from the first campaign and proceed scaling further.

To show that I'm serious about this proposal, I promise to donate the first 100 NANO to this campaign if the NANO center gives us a green light for this proposal. Without NANo center's green light, I think this proposal doesn't have much chances of success.
submitted by ureindanger to nanocurrency [link] [comments]

What Are Bitcoin Blocks and Bitcoin Confirmations ? Transaction confirmations on the blockchain and in your wallet Bitcoin (BTC) Technical Analysis: Wait For Confirmation What is a Bitcoin confirmation? ATTENTION !! HUUGE WARNING TO ALL ALTCOIN HOLDERS IF BTC DOMINANCE BREAKS THIS KEY LEVEL!!

sweepprivkey is a PROPOSED Bitcoin RPC command that, given a Bitcoin private key, allows sweeping of some or all of the funds to another address. Despite this specification, this proposal has never been implemented, and cannot be considered for inclusion until it is. This function is useful for merchants who wish to accept typed or scanned Bitcoin private keys as payments, without imposing any The bitcoin scalability problem exists because of the limits of the maximum amount of transactions the bitcoin network can process. It is a consequence of the fact that blocks in the blockchain are limited to one megabyte in size. [1] Bitcoin blocks carry the transactions on the bitcoin network since the last block has been created. Bitcoin is a form of digital cash that allows online payments between the buyer and the seller. It works as a digital ledger that records transactions and balances of accounts. Hence, Bitcoin core should never trust by itself in this instance, and should always wait around on a confirmation for transform before sending on this adjust. Bitcoin exchanges can set up their primary Bitcoin computer to no longer allow modify, with zero confirmations, to become included in any Bitcoin deal. Surplus gift cards, leftover from foregone holidays and celebrations, can be converted into bitcoin. There is a catch though; sellers agreeing to such arrangements will demand higher premiums. The risk to the party sending the bitcoin is greater though, which is once again, due to the irreversibility of bitcoin transactions and because gift

[index] [24596] [22757] [6602] [12341] [10946] [6307] [4716] [481] [28318] [12990]

What Are Bitcoin Blocks and Bitcoin Confirmations ?

bitcoin bullish confirmation!! why altcoins will explode!!! massive gains ahead!! - duration: 19:03. crypto zombie 27,006 views. new; 19:03. how high will chainlink go?! A short simplified tutorial about Bitcoin blocks and confirmations for newbies. For the full article: http://99bitcoins.com/bitcoin-confirmations/ Join me as I take you along while I conduct a real Bitcoin transaction, and we go for a ride along the Bitcoin blockchain so you can see the process of how transactions gain confirmations. Accelerate your Bitcoin Transactions / Slow Bitcoin confirmations Accelerate link https://pool.viabtc.com/tools/txaccelerator/ Bitcoin online class https://w... What exactly is 'confirmed' by Bitcoin? Why do transaction confirmations matter, and how does that relate to block confirmations? In This video shot on West Oakland Park Blvd in Broward County ...

Flag Counter