United States Bitcoin Miner Market 2020 is Evolving

Since they're calling for r/btc to be banned...

Maybe it's time to discuss bitcoin's history again. Credit to u/singularity87 for the original post over 3 years ago.

People should get the full story of bitcoin because it is probably one of the strangest of all reddit subs.
bitcoin, the main sub for the bitcoin community is held and run by a person who goes by the pseudonym u/theymos. Theymos not only controls bitcoin, but also bitcoin.org and bitcointalk.com. These are top three communication channels for the bitcoin community, all controlled by just one person.
For most of bitcoin's history this did not create a problem (at least not an obvious one anyway) until around mid 2015. This happened to be around the time a new player appeared on the scene, a for-profit company called Blockstream. Blockstream was made up of/hired many (but not all) of the main bitcoin developers. (To be clear, Blockstream was founded before mid 2015 but did not become publicly active until then). A lot of people, including myself, tried to point out there we're some very serious potential conflicts of interest that could arise when one single company controls most of the main developers for the biggest decentralised and distributed cryptocurrency. There were a lot of unknowns but people seemed to give them the benefit of the doubt because they were apparently about to release some new software called "sidechains" that could offer some benefits to the network.
Not long after Blockstream came on the scene the issue of bitcoin's scalability once again came to forefront of the community. This issue came within the community a number of times since bitcoins inception. Bitcoin, as dictated in the code, cannot handle any more than around 3 transactions per second at the moment. To put that in perspective Paypal handles around 15 transactions per second on average and VISA handles something like 2000 transactions per second. The discussion in the community has been around how best to allow bitcoin to scale to allow a higher number of transactions in a given amount of time. I suggest that if anyone is interested in learning more about this problem from a technical angle, they go to btc and do a search. It's a complex issue but for many who have followed bitcoin for many years, the possible solutions seem relatively obvious. Essentially, currently the limit is put in place in just a few lines of code. This was not originally present when bitcoin was first released. It was in fact put in place afterwards as a measure to stop a bloating attack on the network. Because all bitcoin transactions have to be stored forever on the bitcoin network, someone could theoretically simply transmit a large number of transactions which would have to be stored by the entire network forever. When bitcoin was released, transactions were actually for free as the only people running the network were enthusiasts. In fact a single bitcoin did not even have any specific value so it would be impossible set a fee value. This meant that a malicious person could make the size of the bitcoin ledger grow very rapidly without much/any cost which would stop people from wanting to join the network due to the resource requirements needed to store it, which at the time would have been for very little gain.
Towards the end of the summer last year, this bitcoin scaling debate surfaced again as it was becoming clear that the transaction limit for bitcoin was semi regularly being reached and that it would not be long until it would be regularly hit and the network would become congested. This was a very serious issue for a currency. Bitcoin had made progress over the years to the point of retailers starting to offer it as a payment option. Bitcoin companies like, Microsoft, Paypal, Steam and many more had began to adopt it. If the transaction limit would be constantly maxed out, the network would become unreliable and slow for users. Users and businesses would not be able to make a reliable estimate when their transaction would be confirmed by the network.
Users, developers and businesses (which at the time was pretty much the only real bitcoin subreddit) started to discuss how we should solve the problem bitcoin. There was significant support from the users and businesses behind a simple solution put forward by the developer Gavin Andreesen. Gavin was the lead developer after Satoshi Nakamoto left bitcoin and he left it in his hands. Gavin initially proposed a very simple solution of increasing the limit which was to change the few lines of code to increase the maximum number of transactions that are allowed. For most of bitcoin's history the transaction limit had been set far far higher than the number of transactions that could potentially happen on the network. The concept of increasing the limit one time was based on the fact that history had proven that no issue had been cause by this in the past.
A certain group of bitcoin developers decided that increasing the limit by this amount was too much and that it was dangerous. They said that the increased use of resources that the network would use would create centralisation pressures which could destroy the network. The theory was that a miner of the network with more resources could publish many more transactions than a competing small miner could handle and therefore the network would tend towards few large miners rather than many small miners. The group of developers who supported this theory were all developers who worked for the company Blockstream. The argument from people in support of increasing the transaction capacity by this amount was that there are always inherent centralisation pressure with bitcoin mining. For example miners who can access the cheapest electricity will tend to succeed and that bigger miners will be able to find this cheaper electricity easier. Miners who have access to the most efficient computer chips will tend to succeed and that larger miners are more likely to be able to afford the development of them. The argument from Gavin and other who supported increasing the transaction capacity by this method are essentially there are economies of scale in mining and that these economies have far bigger centralisation pressures than increased resource cost for a larger number of transactions (up to the new limit proposed). For example, at the time the total size of the blockchain was around 50GB. Even for the cost of a 500GB SSD is only $150 and would last a number of years. This is in-comparison to the $100,000's in revenue per day a miner would be making.
Various developers put forth various other proposals, including Gavin Andresen who put forth a more conservative increase that would then continue to increase over time inline with technological improvements. Some of the employees of blockstream also put forth some proposals, but all were so conservative, it would take bitcoin many decades before it could reach a scale of VISA. Even though there was significant support from the community behind Gavin's simple proposal of increasing the limit it was becoming clear certain members of the bitcoin community who were part of Blockstream were starting to become increasingly vitriolic and divisive. Gavin then teamed up with one of the other main bitcoin developers Mike Hearn and released a coded (i.e. working) version of the bitcoin software that would only activate if it was supported by a significant majority of the network. What happened next was where things really started to get weird.
After this free and open source software was released, Theymos, the person who controls all the main communication channels for the bitcoin community implemented a new moderation policy that disallowed any discussion of this new software. Specifically, if people were to discuss this software, their comments would be deleted and ultimately they would be banned temporarily or permanently. This caused chaos within the community as there was very clear support for this software at the time and it seemed our best hope for finally solving the problem and moving on. Instead a censorship campaign was started. At first it 'all' they were doing was banning and removing discussions but after a while it turned into actively manipulating the discussion. For example, if a thread was created where there was positive sentiment for increasing the transaction capacity or being negative about the moderation policies or negative about the actions of certain bitcoin developers, the mods of bitcoin would selectively change the sorting order of threads to 'controversial' so that the most support opinions would be sorted to the bottom of the thread and the most vitriolic would be sorted to the top of the thread. This was initially very transparent as it was possible to see that the most downvoted comments were at the top and some of the most upvoted were at the bottom. So they then implemented hiding the voting scores next to the users name. This made impossible to work out the sentiment of the community and when combined with selectively setting the sorting order to controversial it was possible control what information users were seeing. Also, due to the very very large number of removed comments and users it was becoming obvious the scale of censorship going on. To hide this they implemented code in their CSS for the sub that completely hid comments that they had removed so that the censorship itself was hidden. Anyone in support of scaling bitcoin were removed from the main communication channels. Theymos even proudly announced that he didn't care if he had to remove 90% of the users. He also later acknowledged that he knew he had the ability to block support of this software using the control he had over the communication channels.
While this was all going on, Blockstream and it's employees started lobbying the community by paying for conferences about scaling bitcoin, but with the very very strange rule that no decisions could be made and no complete solutions could be proposed. These conferences were likely strategically (and successfully) created to stunt support for the scaling software Gavin and Mike had released by forcing the community to take a "lets wait and see what comes from the conferences" kind of approach. Since no final solutions were allowed at these conferences, they only served to hinder and splinter the communities efforts to find a solution. As the software Gavin and Mike released called BitcoinXT gained support it started to be attacked. Users of the software were attack by DDOS. Employees of Blockstream were recommending attacks against the software, such as faking support for it, to only then drop support at the last moment to put the network in disarray. Blockstream employees were also publicly talking about suing Gavin and Mike from various different angles simply for releasing this open source software that no one was forced to run. In the end Mike Hearn decided to leave due to the way many members of the bitcoin community had treated him. This was due to the massive disinformation campaign against him on bitcoin. One of the many tactics that are used against anyone who does not support Blockstream and the bitcoin developers who work for them is that you will be targeted in a smear campaign. This has happened to a number of individuals and companies who showed support for scaling bitcoin. Theymos has threatened companies that he will ban any discussion of them on the communication channels he controls (i.e. all the main ones) for simply running software that he disagrees with (i.e. any software that scales bitcoin).
As time passed, more and more proposals were offered, all against the backdrop of ever increasing censorship in the main bitcoin communication channels. It finally come down the smallest and most conservative solution. This solution was much smaller than even the employees of Blockstream had proposed months earlier. As usual there was enormous attacks from all sides and the most vocal opponents were the employees of Blockstream. These attacks still are ongoing today. As this software started to gain support, Blockstream organised more meetings, especially with the biggest bitcoin miners and made a pact with them. They promised that they would release code that would offer an on-chain scaling solution hardfork within about 4 months, but if the miners wanted this they would have to commit to running their software and only their software. The miners agreed and the ended up not running the most conservative proposal possible. This was in February last year. There is no hardfork proposal in sight from the people who agreed to this pact and bitcoin is still stuck with the exact same transaction limit it has had since the limit was put in place about 6 years ago. Gavin has also been publicly smeared by the developers at Blockstream and a plot was made against him to have him removed from the development team. Gavin has now been, for all intents an purposes, expelled from bitcoin development. This has meant that all control of bitcoin development is in the hands of the developers working at Blockstream.
There is a new proposal that offers a market based approach to scaling bitcoin. This essentially lets the market decide. Of course, as usual there has been attacks against it, and verbal attacks from the employees of Blockstream. This has the biggest chance of gaining wide support and solving the problem for good.
To give you an idea of Blockstream; It has hired most of the main and active bitcoin developers and is now synonymous with the "Core" bitcoin development team. They AFAIK no products at all. They have received around $75m in funding. Every single thing they do is supported by theymos. They have started implementing an entirely new economic system for bitcoin against the will of it's users and have blocked any and all attempts to scaling the network in line with the original vision.
Although this comment is ridiculously long, it really only covers the tip of the iceberg. You could write a book on the last two years of bitcoin. The things that have been going on have been mind blowing. One last thing that I think is worth talking about is the u/bashco's claim of vote manipulation.
The users that the video talks about have very very large numbers of downvotes mostly due to them having a very very high chance of being astroturfers. Around about the same time last year when Blockstream came active on the scene every single bitcoin troll disappeared, and I mean literally every single one. In the years before that there were a large number of active anti-bitcoin trolls. They even have an active sub buttcoin. Up until last year you could go down to the bottom of pretty much any thread in bitcoin and see many of the usual trolls who were heavily downvoted for saying something along the lines of "bitcoin is shit", "You guys and your tulips" etc. But suddenly last year they all disappeared. Instead a new type of bitcoin user appeared. Someone who said they were fully in support of bitcoin but they just so happened to support every single thing Blockstream and its employees said and did. They had the exact same tone as the trolls who had disappeared. Their way to talking to people was aggressive, they'd call people names, they had a relatively poor understanding of how bitcoin fundamentally worked. They were extremely argumentative. These users are the majority of the list of that video. When the 10's of thousands of users were censored and expelled from bitcoin they ended up congregating in btc. The strange thing was that the users listed in that video also moved over to btc and spend all day everyday posting troll-like comments and misinformation. Naturally they get heavily downvoted by the real users in btc. They spend their time constantly causing as much drama as possible. At every opportunity they scream about "censorship" in btc while they are happy about the censorship in bitcoin. These people are astroturfers. What someone somewhere worked out, is that all you have to do to take down a community is say that you are on their side. It is an astoundingly effective form of psychological attack.
submitted by CuriousTitmouse to btc [link] [comments]

Why i’m bullish on Zilliqa (long read)

Edit: TL;DR added in the comments
 
Hey all, I've been researching coins since 2017 and have gone through 100s of them in the last 3 years. I got introduced to blockchain via Bitcoin of course, analyzed Ethereum thereafter and from that moment I have a keen interest in smart contact platforms. I’m passionate about Ethereum but I find Zilliqa to have a better risk-reward ratio. Especially because Zilliqa has found an elegant balance between being secure, decentralized and scalable in my opinion.
 
Below I post my analysis of why from all the coins I went through I’m most bullish on Zilliqa (yes I went through Tezos, EOS, NEO, VeChain, Harmony, Algorand, Cardano etc.). Note that this is not investment advice and although it's a thorough analysis there is obviously some bias involved. Looking forward to what you all think!
 
Fun fact: the name Zilliqa is a play on ‘silica’ silicon dioxide which means “Silicon for the high-throughput consensus computer.”
 
This post is divided into (i) Technology, (ii) Business & Partnerships, and (iii) Marketing & Community. I’ve tried to make the technology part readable for a broad audience. If you’ve ever tried understanding the inner workings of Bitcoin and Ethereum you should be able to grasp most parts. Otherwise, just skim through and once you are zoning out head to the next part.
 
Technology and some more:
 
Introduction
 
The technology is one of the main reasons why I’m so bullish on Zilliqa. First thing you see on their website is: “Zilliqa is a high-performance, high-security blockchain platform for enterprises and next-generation applications.” These are some bold statements.
 
Before we deep dive into the technology let’s take a step back in time first as they have quite the history. The initial research paper from which Zilliqa originated dates back to August 2016: Elastico: A Secure Sharding Protocol For Open Blockchains where Loi Luu (Kyber Network) is one of the co-authors. Other ideas that led to the development of what Zilliqa has become today are: Bitcoin-NG, collective signing CoSi, ByzCoin and Omniledger.
 
The technical white paper was made public in August 2017 and since then they have achieved everything stated in the white paper and also created their own open source intermediate level smart contract language called Scilla (functional programming language similar to OCaml) too.
 
Mainnet is live since the end of January 2019 with daily transaction rates growing continuously. About a week ago mainnet reached 5 million transactions, 500.000+ addresses in total along with 2400 nodes keeping the network decentralized and secure. Circulating supply is nearing 11 billion and currently only mining rewards are left. The maximum supply is 21 billion with annual inflation being 7.13% currently and will only decrease with time.
 
Zilliqa realized early on that the usage of public cryptocurrencies and smart contracts were increasing but decentralized, secure, and scalable alternatives were lacking in the crypto space. They proposed to apply sharding onto a public smart contract blockchain where the transaction rate increases almost linear with the increase in the amount of nodes. More nodes = higher transaction throughput and increased decentralization. Sharding comes in many forms and Zilliqa uses network-, transaction- and computational sharding. Network sharding opens up the possibility of using transaction- and computational sharding on top. Zilliqa does not use state sharding for now. We’ll come back to this later.
 
Before we continue dissecting how Zilliqa achieves such from a technological standpoint it’s good to keep in mind that a blockchain being decentralised and secure and scalable is still one of the main hurdles in allowing widespread usage of decentralised networks. In my opinion this needs to be solved first before blockchains can get to the point where they can create and add large scale value. So I invite you to read the next section to grasp the underlying fundamentals. Because after all these premises need to be true otherwise there isn’t a fundamental case to be bullish on Zilliqa, right?
 
Down the rabbit hole
 
How have they achieved this? Let’s define the basics first: key players on Zilliqa are the users and the miners. A user is anybody who uses the blockchain to transfer funds or run smart contracts. Miners are the (shard) nodes in the network who run the consensus protocol and get rewarded for their service in Zillings (ZIL). The mining network is divided into several smaller networks called shards, which is also referred to as ‘network sharding’. Miners subsequently are randomly assigned to a shard by another set of miners called DS (Directory Service) nodes. The regular shards process transactions and the outputs of these shards are eventually combined by the DS shard as they reach consensus on the final state. More on how these DS shards reach consensus (via pBFT) will be explained later on.
 
The Zilliqa network produces two types of blocks: DS blocks and Tx blocks. One DS Block consists of 100 Tx Blocks. And as previously mentioned there are two types of nodes concerned with reaching consensus: shard nodes and DS nodes. Becoming a shard node or DS node is being defined by the result of a PoW cycle (Ethash) at the beginning of the DS Block. All candidate mining nodes compete with each other and run the PoW (Proof-of-Work) cycle for 60 seconds and the submissions achieving the highest difficulty will be allowed on the network. And to put it in perspective: the average difficulty for one DS node is ~ 2 Th/s equaling 2.000.000 Mh/s or 55 thousand+ GeForce GTX 1070 / 8 GB GPUs at 35.4 Mh/s. Each DS Block 10 new DS nodes are allowed. And a shard node needs to provide around 8.53 GH/s currently (around 240 GTX 1070s). Dual mining ETH/ETC and ZIL is possible and can be done via mining software such as Phoenix and Claymore. There are pools and if you have large amounts of hashing power (Ethash) available you could mine solo.
 
The PoW cycle of 60 seconds is a peak performance and acts as an entry ticket to the network. The entry ticket is called a sybil resistance mechanism and makes it incredibly hard for adversaries to spawn lots of identities and manipulate the network with these identities. And after every 100 Tx Blocks which corresponds to roughly 1,5 hour this PoW process repeats. In between these 1,5 hour, no PoW needs to be done meaning Zilliqa’s energy consumption to keep the network secure is low. For more detailed information on how mining works click here.
Okay, hats off to you. You have made it this far. Before we go any deeper down the rabbit hole we first must understand why Zilliqa goes through all of the above technicalities and understand a bit more what a blockchain on a more fundamental level is. Because the core of Zilliqa’s consensus protocol relies on the usage of pBFT (practical Byzantine Fault Tolerance) we need to know more about state machines and their function. Navigate to Viewblock, a Zilliqa block explorer, and just come back to this article. We will use this site to navigate through a few concepts.
 
We have established that Zilliqa is a public and distributed blockchain. Meaning that everyone with an internet connection can send ZILs, trigger smart contracts, etc. and there is no central authority who fully controls the network. Zilliqa and other public and distributed blockchains (like Bitcoin and Ethereum) can also be defined as state machines.
 
Taking the liberty of paraphrasing examples and definitions given by Samuel Brooks’ medium article, he describes the definition of a blockchain (like Zilliqa) as: “A peer-to-peer, append-only datastore that uses consensus to synchronize cryptographically-secure data”.
 
Next, he states that: "blockchains are fundamentally systems for managing valid state transitions”. For some more context, I recommend reading the whole medium article to get a better grasp of the definitions and understanding of state machines. Nevertheless, let’s try to simplify and compile it into a single paragraph. Take traffic lights as an example: all its states (red, amber, and green) are predefined, all possible outcomes are known and it doesn’t matter if you encounter the traffic light today or tomorrow. It will still behave the same. Managing the states of a traffic light can be done by triggering a sensor on the road or pushing a button resulting in one traffic lights’ state going from green to red (via amber) and another light from red to green.
 
With public blockchains like Zilliqa, this isn’t so straightforward and simple. It started with block #1 almost 1,5 years ago and every 45 seconds or so a new block linked to the previous block is being added. Resulting in a chain of blocks with transactions in it that everyone can verify from block #1 to the current #647.000+ block. The state is ever changing and the states it can find itself in are infinite. And while the traffic light might work together in tandem with various other traffic lights, it’s rather insignificant comparing it to a public blockchain. Because Zilliqa consists of 2400 nodes who need to work together to achieve consensus on what the latest valid state is while some of these nodes may have latency or broadcast issues, drop offline or are deliberately trying to attack the network, etc.
 
Now go back to the Viewblock page take a look at the amount of transaction, addresses, block and DS height and then hit refresh. Obviously as expected you see new incremented values on one or all parameters. And how did the Zilliqa blockchain manage to transition from a previous valid state to the latest valid state? By using pBFT to reach consensus on the latest valid state.
 
After having obtained the entry ticket, miners execute pBFT to reach consensus on the ever-changing state of the blockchain. pBFT requires a series of network communication between nodes, and as such there is no GPU involved (but CPU). Resulting in the total energy consumed to keep the blockchain secure, decentralized and scalable being low.
 
pBFT stands for practical Byzantine Fault Tolerance and is an optimization on the Byzantine Fault Tolerant algorithm. To quote Blockonomi: “In the context of distributed systems, Byzantine Fault Tolerance is the ability of a distributed computer network to function as desired and correctly reach a sufficient consensus despite malicious components (nodes) of the system failing or propagating incorrect information to other peers.” Zilliqa is such a distributed computer network and depends on the honesty of the nodes (shard and DS) to reach consensus and to continuously update the state with the latest block. If pBFT is a new term for you I can highly recommend the Blockonomi article.
 
The idea of pBFT was introduced in 1999 - one of the authors even won a Turing award for it - and it is well researched and applied in various blockchains and distributed systems nowadays. If you want more advanced information than the Blockonomi link provides click here. And if you’re in between Blockonomi and the University of Singapore read the Zilliqa Design Story Part 2 dating from October 2017.
Quoting from the Zilliqa tech whitepaper: “pBFT relies upon a correct leader (which is randomly selected) to begin each phase and proceed when the sufficient majority exists. In case the leader is byzantine it can stall the entire consensus protocol. To address this challenge, pBFT offers a view change protocol to replace the byzantine leader with another one.”
 
pBFT can tolerate ⅓ of the nodes being dishonest (offline counts as Byzantine = dishonest) and the consensus protocol will function without stalling or hiccups. Once there are more than ⅓ of dishonest nodes but no more than ⅔ the network will be stalled and a view change will be triggered to elect a new DS leader. Only when more than ⅔ of the nodes are dishonest (66%) double-spend attacks become possible.
 
If the network stalls no transactions can be processed and one has to wait until a new honest leader has been elected. When the mainnet was just launched and in its early phases, view changes happened regularly. As of today the last stalling of the network - and view change being triggered - was at the end of October 2019.
 
Another benefit of using pBFT for consensus besides low energy is the immediate finality it provides. Once your transaction is included in a block and the block is added to the chain it’s done. Lastly, take a look at this article where three types of finality are being defined: probabilistic, absolute and economic finality. Zilliqa falls under the absolute finality (just like Tendermint for example). Although lengthy already we skipped through some of the inner workings from Zilliqa’s consensus: read the Zilliqa Design Story Part 3 and you will be close to having a complete picture on it. Enough about PoW, sybil resistance mechanism, pBFT, etc. Another thing we haven’t looked at yet is the amount of decentralization.
 
Decentralisation
 
Currently, there are four shards, each one of them consisting of 600 nodes. 1 shard with 600 so-called DS nodes (Directory Service - they need to achieve a higher difficulty than shard nodes) and 1800 shard nodes of which 250 are shard guards (centralized nodes controlled by the team). The amount of shard guards has been steadily declining from 1200 in January 2019 to 250 as of May 2020. On the Viewblock statistics, you can see that many of the nodes are being located in the US but those are only the (CPU parts of the) shard nodes who perform pBFT. There is no data from where the PoW sources are coming. And when the Zilliqa blockchain starts reaching its transaction capacity limit, a network upgrade needs to be executed to lift the current cap of maximum 2400 nodes to allow more nodes and formation of more shards which will allow to network to keep on scaling according to demand.
Besides shard nodes there are also seed nodes. The main role of seed nodes is to serve as direct access points (for end-users and clients) to the core Zilliqa network that validates transactions. Seed nodes consolidate transaction requests and forward these to the lookup nodes (another type of nodes) for distribution to the shards in the network. Seed nodes also maintain the entire transaction history and the global state of the blockchain which is needed to provide services such as block explorers. Seed nodes in the Zilliqa network are comparable to Infura on Ethereum.
 
The seed nodes were first only operated by Zilliqa themselves, exchanges and Viewblock. Operators of seed nodes like exchanges had no incentive to open them for the greater public. They were centralised at first. Decentralisation at the seed nodes level has been steadily rolled out since March 2020 ( Zilliqa Improvement Proposal 3 ). Currently the amount of seed nodes is being increased, they are public-facing and at the same time PoS is applied to incentivize seed node operators and make it possible for ZIL holders to stake and earn passive yields. Important distinction: seed nodes are not involved with consensus! That is still PoW as entry ticket and pBFT for the actual consensus.
 
5% of the block rewards are being assigned to seed nodes (from the beginning in 2019) and those are being used to pay out ZIL stakers. The 5% block rewards with an annual yield of 10.03% translate to roughly 610 MM ZILs in total that can be staked. Exchanges use the custodial variant of staking and wallets like Moonlet will use the non-custodial version (starting in Q3 2020). Staking is being done by sending ZILs to a smart contract created by Zilliqa and audited by Quantstamp.
 
With a high amount of DS; shard nodes and seed nodes becoming more decentralized too, Zilliqa qualifies for the label of decentralized in my opinion.
 
Smart contracts
 
Let me start by saying I’m not a developer and my programming skills are quite limited. So I‘m taking the ELI5 route (maybe 12) but if you are familiar with Javascript, Solidity or specifically OCaml please head straight to Scilla - read the docs to get a good initial grasp of how Zilliqa’s smart contract language Scilla works and if you ask yourself “why another programming language?” check this article. And if you want to play around with some sample contracts in an IDE click here. The faucet can be found here. And more information on architecture, dapp development and API can be found on the Developer Portal.
If you are more into listening and watching: check this recent webinar explaining Zilliqa and Scilla. Link is time-stamped so you’ll start right away with a platform introduction, roadmap 2020 and afterwards a proper Scilla introduction.
 
Generalized: programming languages can be divided into being ‘object-oriented’ or ‘functional’. Here is an ELI5 given by software development academy: * “all programs have two basic components, data – what the program knows – and behavior – what the program can do with that data. So object-oriented programming states that combining data and related behaviors in one place, is called “object”, which makes it easier to understand how a particular program works. On the other hand, functional programming argues that data and behavior are different things and should be separated to ensure their clarity.” *
 
Scilla is on the functional side and shares similarities with OCaml: OCaml is a general-purpose programming language with an emphasis on expressiveness and safety. It has an advanced type system that helps catch your mistakes without getting in your way. It's used in environments where a single mistake can cost millions and speed matters, is supported by an active community, and has a rich set of libraries and development tools. For all its power, OCaml is also pretty simple, which is one reason it's often used as a teaching language.
 
Scilla is blockchain agnostic, can be implemented onto other blockchains as well, is recognized by academics and won a so-called Distinguished Artifact Award award at the end of last year.
 
One of the reasons why the Zilliqa team decided to create their own programming language focused on preventing smart contract vulnerabilities is that adding logic on a blockchain, programming, means that you cannot afford to make mistakes. Otherwise, it could cost you. It’s all great and fun blockchains being immutable but updating your code because you found a bug isn’t the same as with a regular web application for example. And with smart contracts, it inherently involves cryptocurrencies in some form thus value.
 
Another difference with programming languages on a blockchain is gas. Every transaction you do on a smart contract platform like Zilliqa or Ethereum costs gas. With gas you basically pay for computational costs. Sending a ZIL from address A to address B costs 0.001 ZIL currently. Smart contracts are more complex, often involve various functions and require more gas (if gas is a new concept click here ).
 
So with Scilla, similar to Solidity, you need to make sure that “every function in your smart contract will run as expected without hitting gas limits. An improper resource analysis may lead to situations where funds may get stuck simply because a part of the smart contract code cannot be executed due to gas limits. Such constraints are not present in traditional software systems”. Scilla design story part 1
 
Some examples of smart contract issues you’d want to avoid are: leaking funds, ‘unexpected changes to critical state variables’ (example: someone other than you setting his or her address as the owner of the smart contract after creation) or simply killing a contract.
 
Scilla also allows for formal verification. Wikipedia to the rescue: In the context of hardware and software systems, formal verification is the act of proving or disproving the correctness of intended algorithms underlying a system with respect to a certain formal specification or property, using formal methods of mathematics.
 
Formal verification can be helpful in proving the correctness of systems such as: cryptographic protocols, combinational circuits, digital circuits with internal memory, and software expressed as source code.
 
Scilla is being developed hand-in-hand with formalization of its semantics and its embedding into the Coq proof assistant — a state-of-the art tool for mechanized proofs about properties of programs.”
 
Simply put, with Scilla and accompanying tooling developers can be mathematically sure and proof that the smart contract they’ve written does what he or she intends it to do.
 
Smart contract on a sharded environment and state sharding
 
There is one more topic I’d like to touch on: smart contract execution in a sharded environment (and what is the effect of state sharding). This is a complex topic. I’m not able to explain it any easier than what is posted here. But I will try to compress the post into something easy to digest.
 
Earlier on we have established that Zilliqa can process transactions in parallel due to network sharding. This is where the linear scalability comes from. We can define simple transactions: a transaction from address A to B (Category 1), a transaction where a user interacts with one smart contract (Category 2) and the most complex ones where triggering a transaction results in multiple smart contracts being involved (Category 3). The shards are able to process transactions on their own without interference of the other shards. With Category 1 transactions that is doable, with Category 2 transactions sometimes if that address is in the same shard as the smart contract but with Category 3 you definitely need communication between the shards. Solving that requires to make a set of communication rules the protocol needs to follow in order to process all transactions in a generalised fashion.
 
And this is where the downsides of state sharding comes in currently. All shards in Zilliqa have access to the complete state. Yes the state size (0.1 GB at the moment) grows and all of the nodes need to store it but it also means that they don’t need to shop around for information available on other shards. Requiring more communication and adding more complexity. Computer science knowledge and/or developer knowledge required links if you want to dig further: Scilla - language grammar Scilla - Foundations for Verifiable Decentralised Computations on a Blockchain Gas Accounting NUS x Zilliqa: Smart contract language workshop
 
Easier to follow links on programming Scilla https://learnscilla.com/home Ivan on Tech
 
Roadmap / Zilliqa 2.0
 
There is no strict defined roadmap but here are topics being worked on. And via the Zilliqa website there is also more information on the projects they are working on.
 
Business & Partnerships
 
It’s not only technology in which Zilliqa seems to be excelling as their ecosystem has been expanding and starting to grow rapidly. The project is on a mission to provide OpenFinance (OpFi) to the world and Singapore is the right place to be due to its progressive regulations and futuristic thinking. Singapore has taken a proactive approach towards cryptocurrencies by introducing the Payment Services Act 2019 (PS Act). Among other things, the PS Act will regulate intermediaries dealing with certain cryptocurrencies, with a particular focus on consumer protection and anti-money laundering. It will also provide a stable regulatory licensing and operating framework for cryptocurrency entities, effectively covering all crypto businesses and exchanges based in Singapore. According to PWC 82% of the surveyed executives in Singapore reported blockchain initiatives underway and 13% of them have already brought the initiatives live to the market. There is also an increasing list of organizations that are starting to provide digital payment services. Moreover, Singaporean blockchain developers Building Cities Beyond has recently created an innovation $15 million grant to encourage development on its ecosystem. This all suggests that Singapore tries to position itself as (one of) the leading blockchain hubs in the world.
 
Zilliqa seems to already take advantage of this and recently helped launch Hg Exchange on their platform, together with financial institutions PhillipCapital, PrimePartners and Fundnel. Hg Exchange, which is now approved by the Monetary Authority of Singapore (MAS), uses smart contracts to represent digital assets. Through Hg Exchange financial institutions worldwide can use Zilliqa's safe-by-design smart contracts to enable the trading of private equities. For example, think of companies such as Grab, Airbnb, SpaceX that are not available for public trading right now. Hg Exchange will allow investors to buy shares of private companies & unicorns and capture their value before an IPO. Anquan, the main company behind Zilliqa, has also recently announced that they became a partner and shareholder in TEN31 Bank, which is a fully regulated bank allowing for tokenization of assets and is aiming to bridge the gap between conventional banking and the blockchain world. If STOs, the tokenization of assets, and equity trading will continue to increase, then Zilliqa’s public blockchain would be the ideal candidate due to its strategic positioning, partnerships, regulatory compliance and the technology that is being built on top of it.
 
What is also very encouraging is their focus on banking the un(der)banked. They are launching a stablecoin basket starting with XSGD. As many of you know, stablecoins are currently mostly used for trading. However, Zilliqa is actively trying to broaden the use case of stablecoins. I recommend everybody to read this text that Amrit Kumar wrote (one of the co-founders). These stablecoins will be integrated in the traditional markets and bridge the gap between the crypto world and the traditional world. This could potentially revolutionize and legitimise the crypto space if retailers and companies will for example start to use stablecoins for payments or remittances, instead of it solely being used for trading.
 
Zilliqa also released their DeFi strategic roadmap (dating November 2019) which seems to be aligning well with their OpFi strategy. A non-custodial DEX is coming to Zilliqa made by Switcheo which allows cross-chain trading (atomic swaps) between ETH, EOS and ZIL based tokens. They also signed a Memorandum of Understanding for a (soon to be announced) USD stablecoin. And as Zilliqa is all about regulations and being compliant, I’m speculating on it to be a regulated USD stablecoin. Furthermore, XSGD is already created and visible on block explorer and XIDR (Indonesian Stablecoin) is also coming soon via StraitsX. Here also an overview of the Tech Stack for Financial Applications from September 2019. Further quoting Amrit Kumar on this:
 
There are two basic building blocks in DeFi/OpFi though: 1) stablecoins as you need a non-volatile currency to get access to this market and 2) a dex to be able to trade all these financial assets. The rest are built on top of these blocks.
 
So far, together with our partners and community, we have worked on developing these building blocks with XSGD as a stablecoin. We are working on bringing a USD-backed stablecoin as well. We will soon have a decentralised exchange developed by Switcheo. And with HGX going live, we are also venturing into the tokenization space. More to come in the future.”
 
Additionally, they also have this ZILHive initiative that injects capital into projects. There have been already 6 waves of various teams working on infrastructure, innovation and research, and they are not from ASEAN or Singapore only but global: see Grantees breakdown by country. Over 60 project teams from over 20 countries have contributed to Zilliqa's ecosystem. This includes individuals and teams developing wallets, explorers, developer toolkits, smart contract testing frameworks, dapps, etc. As some of you may know, Unstoppable Domains (UD) blew up when they launched on Zilliqa. UD aims to replace cryptocurrency addresses with a human-readable name and allows for uncensorable websites. Zilliqa will probably be the only one able to handle all these transactions onchain due to ability to scale and its resulting low fees which is why the UD team launched this on Zilliqa in the first place. Furthermore, Zilliqa also has a strong emphasis on security, compliance, and privacy, which is why they partnered with companies like Elliptic, ChainSecurity (part of PwC Switzerland), and Incognito. Their sister company Aqilliz (Zilliqa spelled backwards) focuses on revolutionizing the digital advertising space and is doing interesting things like using Zilliqa to track outdoor digital ads with companies like Foodpanda.
 
Zilliqa is listed on nearly all major exchanges, having several different fiat-gateways and recently have been added to Binance’s margin trading and futures trading with really good volume. They also have a very impressive team with good credentials and experience. They don't just have “tech people”. They have a mix of tech people, business people, marketeers, scientists, and more. Naturally, it's good to have a mix of people with different skill sets if you work in the crypto space.
 
Marketing & Community
 
Zilliqa has a very strong community. If you just follow their Twitter their engagement is much higher for a coin that has approximately 80k followers. They also have been ‘coin of the day’ by LunarCrush many times. LunarCrush tracks real-time cryptocurrency value and social data. According to their data, it seems Zilliqa has a more fundamental and deeper understanding of marketing and community engagement than almost all other coins. While almost all coins have been a bit frozen in the last months, Zilliqa seems to be on its own bull run. It was somewhere in the 100s a few months ago and is currently ranked #46 on CoinGecko. Their official Telegram also has over 20k people and is very active, and their community channel which is over 7k now is more active and larger than many other official channels. Their local communities also seem to be growing.
 
Moreover, their community started ‘Zillacracy’ together with the Zilliqa core team ( see www.zillacracy.com ). It’s a community-run initiative where people from all over the world are now helping with marketing and development on Zilliqa. Since its launch in February 2020 they have been doing a lot and will also run their own non-custodial seed node for staking. This seed node will also allow them to start generating revenue for them to become a self sustaining entity that could potentially scale up to become a decentralized company working in parallel with the Zilliqa core team. Comparing it to all the other smart contract platforms (e.g. Cardano, EOS, Tezos etc.) they don't seem to have started a similar initiative (correct me if I’m wrong though). This suggests in my opinion that these other smart contract platforms do not fully understand how to utilize the ‘power of the community’. This is something you cannot ‘buy with money’ and gives many projects in the space a disadvantage.
 
Zilliqa also released two social products called SocialPay and Zeeves. SocialPay allows users to earn ZILs while tweeting with a specific hashtag. They have recently used it in partnership with the Singapore Red Cross for a marketing campaign after their initial pilot program. It seems like a very valuable social product with a good use case. I can see a lot of traditional companies entering the space through this product, which they seem to suggest will happen. Tokenizing hashtags with smart contracts to get network effect is a very smart and innovative idea.
 
Regarding Zeeves, this is a tipping bot for Telegram. They already have 1000s of signups and they plan to keep upgrading it for more and more people to use it (e.g. they recently have added a quiz features). They also use it during AMAs to reward people in real-time. It’s a very smart approach to grow their communities and get familiar with ZIL. I can see this becoming very big on Telegram. This tool suggests, again, that the Zilliqa team has a deeper understanding of what the crypto space and community needs and is good at finding the right innovative tools to grow and scale.
 
To be honest, I haven’t covered everything (i’m also reaching the character limited haha). So many updates happening lately that it's hard to keep up, such as the International Monetary Fund mentioning Zilliqa in their report, custodial and non-custodial Staking, Binance Margin, Futures, Widget, entering the Indian market, and more. The Head of Marketing Colin Miles has also released this as an overview of what is coming next. And last but not least, Vitalik Buterin has been mentioning Zilliqa lately acknowledging Zilliqa and mentioning that both projects have a lot of room to grow. There is much more info of course and a good part of it has been served to you on a silver platter. I invite you to continue researching by yourself :-) And if you have any comments or questions please post here!
submitted by haveyouheardaboutit to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Why i’m bullish on Zilliqa (long read)

Hey all, I've been researching coins since 2017 and have gone through 100s of them in the last 3 years. I got introduced to blockchain via Bitcoin of course, analysed Ethereum thereafter and from that moment I have a keen interest in smart contact platforms. I’m passionate about Ethereum but I find Zilliqa to have a better risk reward ratio. Especially because Zilliqa has found an elegant balance between being secure, decentralised and scalable in my opinion.
 
Below I post my analysis why from all the coins I went through I’m most bullish on Zilliqa (yes I went through Tezos, EOS, NEO, VeChain, Harmony, Algorand, Cardano etc.). Note that this is not investment advice and although it's a thorough analysis there is obviously some bias involved. Looking forward to what you all think!
 
Fun fact: the name Zilliqa is a play on ‘silica’ silicon dioxide which means “Silicon for the high-throughput consensus computer.”
 
This post is divided into (i) Technology, (ii) Business & Partnerships, and (iii) Marketing & Community. I’ve tried to make the technology part readable for a broad audience. If you’ve ever tried understanding the inner workings of Bitcoin and Ethereum you should be able to grasp most parts. Otherwise just skim through and once you are zoning out head to the next part.
 
Technology and some more:
 
Introduction The technology is one of the main reasons why I’m so bullish on Zilliqa. First thing you see on their website is: “Zilliqa is a high-performance, high-security blockchain platform for enterprises and next-generation applications.” These are some bold statements.
 
Before we deep dive into the technology let’s take a step back in time first as they have quite the history. The initial research paper from which Zilliqa originated dates back to August 2016: Elastico: A Secure Sharding Protocol For Open Blockchains where Loi Luu (Kyber Network) is one of the co-authors. Other ideas that led to the development of what Zilliqa has become today are: Bitcoin-NG, collective signing CoSi, ByzCoin and Omniledger.
 
The technical white paper was made public in August 2017 and since then they have achieved everything stated in the white paper and also created their own open source intermediate level smart contract language called Scilla (functional programming language similar to OCaml) too.
 
Mainnet is live since end of January 2019 with daily transaction rate growing continuously. About a week ago mainnet reached 5 million transactions, 500.000+ addresses in total along with 2400 nodes keeping the network decentralised and secure. Circulating supply is nearing 11 billion and currently only mining rewards are left. Maximum supply is 21 billion with annual inflation being 7.13% currently and will only decrease with time.
 
Zilliqa realised early on that the usage of public cryptocurrencies and smart contracts were increasing but decentralised, secure and scalable alternatives were lacking in the crypto space. They proposed to apply sharding onto a public smart contract blockchain where the transaction rate increases almost linear with the increase in amount of nodes. More nodes = higher transaction throughput and increased decentralisation. Sharding comes in many forms and Zilliqa uses network-, transaction- and computational sharding. Network sharding opens up the possibility of using transaction- and computational sharding on top. Zilliqa does not use state sharding for now. We’ll come back to this later.
 
Before we continue disecting how Zilliqa achieves such from a technological standpoint it’s good to keep in mind that a blockchain being decentralised and secure and scalable is still one of the main hurdles in allowing widespread usage of decentralised networks. In my opinion this needs to be solved first before blockchains can get to the point where they can create and add large scale value. So I invite you to read the next section to grasp the underlying fundamentals. Because after all these premises need to be true otherwise there isn’t a fundamental case to be bullish on Zilliqa, right?
 
Down the rabbit hole
 
How have they achieved this? Let’s define the basics first: key players on Zilliqa are the users and the miners. A user is anybody who uses the blockchain to transfer funds or run smart contracts. Miners are the (shard) nodes in the network who run the consensus protocol and get rewarded for their service in Zillings (ZIL). The mining network is divided into several smaller networks called shards, which is also referred to as ‘network sharding’. Miners subsequently are randomly assigned to a shard by another set of miners called DS (Directory Service) nodes. The regular shards process transactions and the outputs of these shards are eventually combined by the DS shard as they reach consensus on the final state. More on how these DS shards reach consensus (via pBFT) will be explained later on.
 
The Zilliqa network produces two types of blocks: DS blocks and Tx blocks. One DS Block consists of 100 Tx Blocks. And as previously mentioned there are two types of nodes concerned with reaching consensus: shard nodes and DS nodes. Becoming a shard node or DS node is being defined by the result of a PoW cycle (Ethash) at the beginning of the DS Block. All candidate mining nodes compete with each other and run the PoW (Proof-of-Work) cycle for 60 seconds and the submissions achieving the highest difficulty will be allowed on the network. And to put it in perspective: the average difficulty for one DS node is ~ 2 Th/s equaling 2.000.000 Mh/s or 55 thousand+ GeForce GTX 1070 / 8 GB GPUs at 35.4 Mh/s. Each DS Block 10 new DS nodes are allowed. And a shard node needs to provide around 8.53 GH/s currently (around 240 GTX 1070s). Dual mining ETH/ETC and ZIL is possible and can be done via mining software such as Phoenix and Claymore. There are pools and if you have large amounts of hashing power (Ethash) available you could mine solo.
 
The PoW cycle of 60 seconds is a peak performance and acts as an entry ticket to the network. The entry ticket is called a sybil resistance mechanism and makes it incredibly hard for adversaries to spawn lots of identities and manipulate the network with these identities. And after every 100 Tx Blocks which corresponds to roughly 1,5 hour this PoW process repeats. In between these 1,5 hour no PoW needs to be done meaning Zilliqa’s energy consumption to keep the network secure is low. For more detailed information on how mining works click here.
Okay, hats off to you. You have made it this far. Before we go any deeper down the rabbit hole we first must understand why Zilliqa goes through all of the above technicalities and understand a bit more what a blockchain on a more fundamental level is. Because the core of Zilliqa’s consensus protocol relies on the usage of pBFT (practical Byzantine Fault Tolerance) we need to know more about state machines and their function. Navigate to Viewblock, a Zilliqa block explorer, and just come back to this article. We will use this site to navigate through a few concepts.
 
We have established that Zilliqa is a public and distributed blockchain. Meaning that everyone with an internet connection can send ZILs, trigger smart contracts etc. and there is no central authority who fully controls the network. Zilliqa and other public and distributed blockchains (like Bitcoin and Ethereum) can also be defined as state machines.
 
Taking the liberty of paraphrasing examples and definitions given by Samuel Brooks’ medium article, he describes the definition of a blockchain (like Zilliqa) as:
“A peer-to-peer, append-only datastore that uses consensus to synchronise cryptographically-secure data”.
 
Next he states that: >“blockchains are fundamentally systems for managing valid state transitions”.* For some more context, I recommend reading the whole medium article to get a better grasp of the definitions and understanding of state machines. Nevertheless, let’s try to simplify and compile it into a single paragraph. Take traffic lights as an example: all its states (red, amber and green) are predefined, all possible outcomes are known and it doesn’t matter if you encounter the traffic light today or tomorrow. It will still behave the same. Managing the states of a traffic light can be done by triggering a sensor on the road or pushing a button resulting in one traffic lights’ state going from green to red (via amber) and another light from red to green.
 
With public blockchains like Zilliqa this isn’t so straightforward and simple. It started with block #1 almost 1,5 years ago and every 45 seconds or so a new block linked to the previous block is being added. Resulting in a chain of blocks with transactions in it that everyone can verify from block #1 to the current #647.000+ block. The state is ever changing and the states it can find itself in are infinite. And while the traffic light might work together in tandem with various other traffic lights, it’s rather insignificant comparing it to a public blockchain. Because Zilliqa consists of 2400 nodes who need to work together to achieve consensus on what the latest valid state is while some of these nodes may have latency or broadcast issues, drop offline or are deliberately trying to attack the network etc.
 
Now go back to the Viewblock page take a look at the amount of transaction, addresses, block and DS height and then hit refresh. Obviously as expected you see new incremented values on one or all parameters. And how did the Zilliqa blockchain manage to transition from a previous valid state to the latest valid state? By using pBFT to reach consensus on the latest valid state.
 
After having obtained the entry ticket, miners execute pBFT to reach consensus on the ever changing state of the blockchain. pBFT requires a series of network communication between nodes, and as such there is no GPU involved (but CPU). Resulting in the total energy consumed to keep the blockchain secure, decentralised and scalable being low.
 
pBFT stands for practical Byzantine Fault Tolerance and is an optimisation on the Byzantine Fault Tolerant algorithm. To quote Blockonomi: “In the context of distributed systems, Byzantine Fault Tolerance is the ability of a distributed computer network to function as desired and correctly reach a sufficient consensus despite malicious components (nodes) of the system failing or propagating incorrect information to other peers.” Zilliqa is such a distributed computer network and depends on the honesty of the nodes (shard and DS) to reach consensus and to continuously update the state with the latest block. If pBFT is a new term for you I can highly recommend the Blockonomi article.
 
The idea of pBFT was introduced in 1999 - one of the authors even won a Turing award for it - and it is well researched and applied in various blockchains and distributed systems nowadays. If you want more advanced information than the Blockonomi link provides click here. And if you’re in between Blockonomi and University of Singapore read the Zilliqa Design Story Part 2 dating from October 2017.
Quoting from the Zilliqa tech whitepaper: “pBFT relies upon a correct leader (which is randomly selected) to begin each phase and proceed when the sufficient majority exists. In case the leader is byzantine it can stall the entire consensus protocol. To address this challenge, pBFT offers a view change protocol to replace the byzantine leader with another one.”
 
pBFT can tolerate ⅓ of the nodes being dishonest (offline counts as Byzantine = dishonest) and the consensus protocol will function without stalling or hiccups. Once there are more than ⅓ of dishonest nodes but no more than ⅔ the network will be stalled and a view change will be triggered to elect a new DS leader. Only when more than ⅔ of the nodes are dishonest (>66%) double spend attacks become possible.
 
If the network stalls no transactions can be processed and one has to wait until a new honest leader has been elected. When the mainnet was just launched and in its early phases, view changes happened regularly. As of today the last stalling of the network - and view change being triggered - was at the end of October 2019.
 
Another benefit of using pBFT for consensus besides low energy is the immediate finality it provides. Once your transaction is included in a block and the block is added to the chain it’s done. Lastly, take a look at this article where three types of finality are being defined: probabilistic, absolute and economic finality. Zilliqa falls under the absolute finality (just like Tendermint for example). Although lengthy already we skipped through some of the inner workings from Zilliqa’s consensus: read the Zilliqa Design Story Part 3 and you will be close to having a complete picture on it. Enough about PoW, sybil resistance mechanism, pBFT etc. Another thing we haven’t looked at yet is the amount of decentralisation.
 
Decentralisation
 
Currently there are four shards, each one of them consisting of 600 nodes. 1 shard with 600 so called DS nodes (Directory Service - they need to achieve a higher difficulty than shard nodes) and 1800 shard nodes of which 250 are shard guards (centralised nodes controlled by the team). The amount of shard guards has been steadily declining from 1200 in January 2019 to 250 as of May 2020. On the Viewblock statistics you can see that many of the nodes are being located in the US but those are only the (CPU parts of the) shard nodes who perform pBFT. There is no data from where the PoW sources are coming. And when the Zilliqa blockchain starts reaching their transaction capacity limit, a network upgrade needs to be executed to lift the current cap of maximum 2400 nodes to allow more nodes and formation of more shards which will allow to network to keep on scaling according to demand.
Besides shard nodes there are also seed nodes. The main role of seed nodes is to serve as direct access points (for end users and clients) to the core Zilliqa network that validates transactions. Seed nodes consolidate transaction requests and forward these to the lookup nodes (another type of nodes) for distribution to the shards in the network. Seed nodes also maintain the entire transaction history and the global state of the blockchain which is needed to provide services such as block explorers. Seed nodes in the Zilliqa network are comparable to Infura on Ethereum.
 
The seed nodes were first only operated by Zilliqa themselves, exchanges and Viewblock. Operators of seed nodes like exchanges had no incentive to open them for the greater public.They were centralised at first. Decentralisation at the seed nodes level has been steadily rolled out since March 2020 ( Zilliqa Improvement Proposal 3 ). Currently the amount of seed nodes is being increased, they are public facing and at the same time PoS is applied to incentivize seed node operators and make it possible for ZIL holders to stake and earn passive yields. Important distinction: seed nodes are not involved with consensus! That is still PoW as entry ticket and pBFT for the actual consensus.
 
5% of the block rewards are being assigned to seed nodes (from the beginning in 2019) and those are being used to pay out ZIL stakers.The 5% block rewards with an annual yield of 10.03% translates to roughly 610 MM ZILs in total that can be staked. Exchanges use the custodial variant of staking and wallets like Moonlet will use the non custodial version (starting in Q3 2020). Staking is being done by sending ZILs to a smart contract created by Zilliqa and audited by Quantstamp.
 
With a high amount of DS & shard nodes and seed nodes becoming more decentralised too, Zilliqa qualifies for the label of decentralised in my opinion.
 
Smart contracts
 
Let me start by saying I’m not a developer and my programming skills are quite limited. So I‘m taking the ELI5 route (maybe 12) but if you are familiar with Javascript, Solidity or specifically OCaml please head straight to Scilla - read the docs to get a good initial grasp of how Zilliqa’s smart contract language Scilla works and if you ask yourself “why another programming language?” check this article. And if you want to play around with some sample contracts in an IDE click here. Faucet can be found here. And more information on architecture, dapp development and API can be found on the Developer Portal.
If you are more into listening and watching: check this recent webinar explaining Zilliqa and Scilla. Link is time stamped so you’ll start right away with a platform introduction, R&D roadmap 2020 and afterwards a proper Scilla introduction.
 
Generalised: programming languages can be divided into being ‘object oriented’ or ‘functional’. Here is an ELI5 given by software development academy: > “all programmes have two basic components, data – what the programme knows – and behaviour – what the programme can do with that data. So object-oriented programming states that combining data and related behaviours in one place, is called “object”, which makes it easier to understand how a particular program works. On the other hand, functional programming argues that data and behaviour are different things and should be separated to ensure their clarity.”
 
Scilla is on the functional side and shares similarities with OCaml: > OCaml is a general purpose programming language with an emphasis on expressiveness and safety. It has an advanced type system that helps catch your mistakes without getting in your way. It's used in environments where a single mistake can cost millions and speed matters, is supported by an active community, and has a rich set of libraries and development tools. For all its power, OCaml is also pretty simple, which is one reason it's often used as a teaching language.
 
Scilla is blockchain agnostic, can be implemented onto other blockchains as well, is recognised by academics and won a so called Distinguished Artifact Award award at the end of last year.
 
One of the reasons why the Zilliqa team decided to create their own programming language focused on preventing smart contract vulnerabilities safety is that adding logic on a blockchain, programming, means that you cannot afford to make mistakes. Otherwise it could cost you. It’s all great and fun blockchains being immutable but updating your code because you found a bug isn’t the same as with a regular web application for example. And with smart contracts it inherently involves cryptocurrencies in some form thus value.
 
Another difference with programming languages on a blockchain is gas. Every transaction you do on a smart contract platform like Zilliqa for Ethereum costs gas. With gas you basically pay for computational costs. Sending a ZIL from address A to address B costs 0.001 ZIL currently. Smart contracts are more complex, often involve various functions and require more gas (if gas is a new concept click here ).
 
So with Scilla, similar to Solidity, you need to make sure that “every function in your smart contract will run as expected without hitting gas limits. An improper resource analysis may lead to situations where funds may get stuck simply because a part of the smart contract code cannot be executed due to gas limits. Such constraints are not present in traditional software systems”. Scilla design story part 1
 
Some examples of smart contract issues you’d want to avoid are: leaking funds, ‘unexpected changes to critical state variables’ (example: someone other than you setting his or her address as the owner of the smart contract after creation) or simply killing a contract.
 
Scilla also allows for formal verification. Wikipedia to the rescue:
In the context of hardware and software systems, formal verification is the act of proving or disproving the correctness of intended algorithms underlying a system with respect to a certain formal specification or property, using formal methods of mathematics.
 
Formal verification can be helpful in proving the correctness of systems such as: cryptographic protocols, combinational circuits, digital circuits with internal memory, and software expressed as source code.
 
Scilla is being developed hand-in-hand with formalization of its semantics and its embedding into the Coq proof assistant — a state-of-the art tool for mechanized proofs about properties of programs.”
 
Simply put, with Scilla and accompanying tooling developers can be mathematically sure and proof that the smart contract they’ve written does what he or she intends it to do.
 
Smart contract on a sharded environment and state sharding
 
There is one more topic I’d like to touch on: smart contract execution in a sharded environment (and what is the effect of state sharding). This is a complex topic. I’m not able to explain it any easier than what is posted here. But I will try to compress the post into something easy to digest.
 
Earlier on we have established that Zilliqa can process transactions in parallel due to network sharding. This is where the linear scalability comes from. We can define simple transactions: a transaction from address A to B (Category 1), a transaction where a user interacts with one smart contract (Category 2) and the most complex ones where triggering a transaction results in multiple smart contracts being involved (Category 3). The shards are able to process transactions on their own without interference of the other shards. With Category 1 transactions that is doable, with Category 2 transactions sometimes if that address is in the same shard as the smart contract but with Category 3 you definitely need communication between the shards. Solving that requires to make a set of communication rules the protocol needs to follow in order to process all transactions in a generalised fashion.
 
And this is where the downsides of state sharding comes in currently. All shards in Zilliqa have access to the complete state. Yes the state size (0.1 GB at the moment) grows and all of the nodes need to store it but it also means that they don’t need to shop around for information available on other shards. Requiring more communication and adding more complexity. Computer science knowledge and/or developer knowledge required links if you want to dig further: Scilla - language grammar Scilla - Foundations for Verifiable Decentralised Computations on a Blockchain Gas Accounting NUS x Zilliqa: Smart contract language workshop
 
Easier to follow links on programming Scilla https://learnscilla.com/home Ivan on Tech
 
Roadmap / Zilliqa 2.0
 
There is no strict defined roadmap but here are topics being worked on. And via the Zilliqa website there is also more information on the projects they are working on.
 
Business & Partnerships  
It’s not only technology in which Zilliqa seems to be excelling as their ecosystem has been expanding and starting to grow rapidly. The project is on a mission to provide OpenFinance (OpFi) to the world and Singapore is the right place to be due to its progressive regulations and futuristic thinking. Singapore has taken a proactive approach towards cryptocurrencies by introducing the Payment Services Act 2019 (PS Act). Among other things, the PS Act will regulate intermediaries dealing with certain cryptocurrencies, with a particular focus on consumer protection and anti-money laundering. It will also provide a stable regulatory licensing and operating framework for cryptocurrency entities, effectively covering all crypto businesses and exchanges based in Singapore. According to PWC 82% of the surveyed executives in Singapore reported blockchain initiatives underway and 13% of them have already brought the initiatives live to the market. There is also an increasing list of organisations that are starting to provide digital payment services. Moreover, Singaporean blockchain developers Building Cities Beyond has recently created an innovation $15 million grant to encourage development on its ecosystem. This all suggest that Singapore tries to position itself as (one of) the leading blockchain hubs in the world.
 
Zilliqa seems to already taking advantage of this and recently helped launch Hg Exchange on their platform, together with financial institutions PhillipCapital, PrimePartners and Fundnel. Hg Exchange, which is now approved by the Monetary Authority of Singapore (MAS), uses smart contracts to represent digital assets. Through Hg Exchange financial institutions worldwide can use Zilliqa's safe-by-design smart contracts to enable the trading of private equities. For example, think of companies such as Grab, AirBnB, SpaceX that are not available for public trading right now. Hg Exchange will allow investors to buy shares of private companies & unicorns and capture their value before an IPO. Anquan, the main company behind Zilliqa, has also recently announced that they became a partner and shareholder in TEN31 Bank, which is a fully regulated bank allowing for tokenization of assets and is aiming to bridge the gap between conventional banking and the blockchain world. If STOs, the tokenization of assets, and equity trading will continue to increase, then Zilliqa’s public blockchain would be the ideal candidate due to its strategic positioning, partnerships, regulatory compliance and the technology that is being built on top of it.
 
What is also very encouraging is their focus on banking the un(der)banked. They are launching a stablecoin basket starting with XSGD. As many of you know, stablecoins are currently mostly used for trading. However, Zilliqa is actively trying to broaden the use case of stablecoins. I recommend everybody to read this text that Amrit Kumar wrote (one of the co-founders). These stablecoins will be integrated in the traditional markets and bridge the gap between the crypto world and the traditional world. This could potentially revolutionize and legitimise the crypto space if retailers and companies will for example start to use stablecoins for payments or remittances, instead of it solely being used for trading.
 
Zilliqa also released their DeFi strategic roadmap (dating November 2019) which seems to be aligning well with their OpFi strategy. A non-custodial DEX is coming to Zilliqa made by Switcheo which allows cross-chain trading (atomic swaps) between ETH, EOS and ZIL based tokens. They also signed a Memorandum of Understanding for a (soon to be announced) USD stablecoin. And as Zilliqa is all about regulations and being compliant, I’m speculating on it to be a regulated USD stablecoin. Furthermore, XSGD is already created and visible on block explorer and XIDR (Indonesian Stablecoin) is also coming soon via StraitsX. Here also an overview of the Tech Stack for Financial Applications from September 2019. Further quoting Amrit Kumar on this:
 
There are two basic building blocks in DeFi/OpFi though: 1) stablecoins as you need a non-volatile currency to get access to this market and 2) a dex to be able to trade all these financial assets. The rest are build on top of these blocks.
 
So far, together with our partners and community, we have worked on developing these building blocks with XSGD as a stablecoin. We are working on bringing a USD-backed stablecoin as well. We will soon have a decentralised exchange developed by Switcheo. And with HGX going live, we are also venturing into the tokenization space. More to come in the future.”*
 
Additionally, they also have this ZILHive initiative that injects capital into projects. There have been already 6 waves of various teams working on infrastructure, innovation and research, and they are not from ASEAN or Singapore only but global: see Grantees breakdown by country. Over 60 project teams from over 20 countries have contributed to Zilliqa's ecosystem. This includes individuals and teams developing wallets, explorers, developer toolkits, smart contract testing frameworks, dapps, etc. As some of you may know, Unstoppable Domains (UD) blew up when they launched on Zilliqa. UD aims to replace cryptocurrency addresses with a human readable name and allows for uncensorable websites. Zilliqa will probably be the only one able to handle all these transactions onchain due to ability to scale and its resulting low fees which is why the UD team launched this on Zilliqa in the first place. Furthermore, Zilliqa also has a strong emphasis on security, compliance, and privacy, which is why they partnered with companies like Elliptic, ChainSecurity (part of PwC Switzerland), and Incognito. Their sister company Aqilliz (Zilliqa spelled backwards) focuses on revolutionizing the digital advertising space and is doing interesting things like using Zilliqa to track outdoor digital ads with companies like Foodpanda.
 
Zilliqa is listed on nearly all major exchanges, having several different fiat-gateways and recently have been added to Binance’s margin trading and futures trading with really good volume. They also have a very impressive team with good credentials and experience. They dont just have “tech people”. They have a mix of tech people, business people, marketeers, scientists, and more. Naturally, it's good to have a mix of people with different skill sets if you work in the crypto space.
 
Marketing & Community
 
Zilliqa has a very strong community. If you just follow their Twitter their engagement is much higher for a coin that has approximately 80k followers. They also have been ‘coin of the day’ by LunarCrush many times. LunarCrush tracks real-time cryptocurrency value and social data. According to their data it seems Zilliqa has a more fundamental and deeper understanding of marketing and community engagement than almost all other coins. While almost all coins have been a bit frozen in the last months, Zilliqa seems to be on its own bull run. It was somewhere in the 100s a few months ago and is currently ranked #46 on CoinGecko. Their official Telegram also has over 20k people and is very active, and their community channel which is over 7k now is more active and larger than many other official channels. Their local communities) also seem to be growing.
 
Moreover, their community started ‘Zillacracy’ together with the Zilliqa core team ( see www.zillacracy.com ). It’s a community run initiative where people from all over the world are now helping with marketing and development on Zilliqa. Since its launch in February 2020 they have been doing a lot and will also run their own non custodial seed node for staking. This seed node will also allow them to start generating revenue for them to become a self sustaining entity that could potentially scale up to become a decentralized company working in parallel with the Zilliqa core team. Comparing it to all the other smart contract platforms (e.g. Cardano, EOS, Tezos etc.) they don't seem to have started a similar initiatives (correct me if I’m wrong though). This suggest in my opinion that these other smart contract platforms do not fully understand how to utilize the ‘power of the community’. This is something you cannot ‘buy with money’ and gives many projects in the space a disadvantage.
 
Zilliqa also released two social products called SocialPay and Zeeves. SocialPay allows users to earn ZILs while tweeting with a specific hashtag. They have recently used it in partnership with the Singapore Red Cross for a marketing campaign after their initial pilot program. It seems like a very valuable social product with a good use case. I can see a lot of traditional companies entering the space through this product, which they seem to suggest will happen. Tokenizing hashtags with smart contracts to get network effect is a very smart and innovative idea.
 
Regarding Zeeves, this is a tipping bot for Telegram. They already have 1000s of signups and they plan to keep upgrading it for more and more people to use it (e.g. they recently have added a quiz features). They also use it during AMAs to reward people in real time. It’s a very smart approach to grow their communities and get familiar with ZIL. I can see this becoming very big on Telegram. This tool suggests, again, that the Zilliqa team has a deeper understanding what the crypto space and community needs and is good at finding the right innovative tools to grow and scale.
 
To be honest, I haven’t covered everything (i’m also reaching the character limited haha). So many updates happening lately that it's hard to keep up, such as the International Monetary Fund mentioning Zilliqa in their report, custodial and non-custodial Staking, Binance Margin, Futures & Widget, entering the Indian market, and more. The Head of Marketing Colin Miles has also released this as an overview of what is coming next. And last but not least, Vitalik Buterin has been mentioning Zilliqa lately acknowledging Zilliqa and mentioning that both projects have a lot of room to grow. There is much more info of course and a good part of it has been served to you on a silver platter. I invite you to continue researching by yourself :-) And if you have any comments or questions please post here!
submitted by haveyouheardaboutit to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Review and Prospect of Crypto Economy-Development and Evolution of Consensus Mechanism (1)

Review and Prospect of Crypto Economy-Development and Evolution of Consensus Mechanism (1)

https://preview.redd.it/7skleasc80a51.png?width=553&format=png&auto=webp&s=fc18cee10bff7b65d5b02487885d936d23382fc8
Table 1 Classification of consensus system
Source: Yuan Yong, Ni Xiaochun, Zeng Shuai, Wang Feiyue, "Development Status and Prospect of Blockchain Consensus Algorithm"
Figure 4 Evolution of consensus algorithm

Figure 4 Evolution of consensus algorithm
Source: Network data

Foreword
The consensus mechanism is one of the important elements of the blockchain and the core rule of the normal operation of the distributed ledger. It is mainly used to solve the trust problem between people and determine who is responsible for generating new blocks and maintaining the effective unification of the system in the blockchain system. Thus, it has become an everlasting research hot topic in blockchain.
This article starts with the concept and role of the consensus mechanism. First, it enables the reader to have a preliminary understanding of the consensus mechanism as a whole; then starting with the two armies and the Byzantine general problem, the evolution of the consensus mechanism is introduced in the order of the time when the consensus mechanism is proposed; Then, it briefly introduces the current mainstream consensus mechanism from three aspects of concept, working principle and representative project, and compares the advantages and disadvantages of the mainstream consensus mechanism; finally, it gives suggestions on how to choose a consensus mechanism for blockchain projects and pointed out the possibility of the future development of the consensus mechanism.
Contents
First, concept and function of the consensus mechanism
1.1 Concept: The core rules for the normal operation of distributed ledgers
1.2 Role: Solve the trust problem and decide the generation and maintenance of new blocks
1.2.1 Used to solve the trust problem between people
1.2.2 Used to decide who is responsible for generating new blocks and maintaining effective unity in the blockchain system
1.3 Mainstream model of consensus algorithm
Second, the origin of the consensus mechanism
2.1 The two armies and the Byzantine generals
2.1.1 The two armies problem
2.1.2 The Byzantine generals problem
2.2 Development history of consensus mechanism
2.2.1 Classification of consensus mechanism
2.2.2 Development frontier of consensus mechanism
Third, Common Consensus System
Fourth, Selection of consensus mechanism and summary of current situation
4.1 How to choose a consensus mechanism that suits you
4.1.1 Determine whether the final result is important
4.1.2 Determine how fast the application process needs to be
4.1.2 Determining the degree to which the application requires for decentralization
4.1.3 Determine whether the system can be terminated
4.1.4 Select a suitable consensus algorithm after weighing the advantages and disadvantages
4.2 Future development of consensus mechanism
Chapter 1 Concept and Function of Consensus Mechanism
1.1 Concept: The core rules for the normal operation of distributed ledgers
Since most cryptocurrencies use decentralized blockchain design, nodes are scattered and parallel everywhere, so a system must be designed to maintain the order and fairness of the system's operation, unify the version of the blockchain, and reward users maintaining the blockchain and punish malicious harmers. Such a system must rely on some way to prove that who has obtained the packaging rights (or accounting rights) of a blockchain and can obtain the reward for packaging this block; or who intends to harm , and will receive certain penalty. Such system is consensus mechanism.
1.2 Role: Solve the trust problem and decide the generation and maintenance of new blocks
1.2.1 Used to solve the trust problem between people
The reason why the consensus mechanism can be at the core of the blockchain technology is that it has formulated a set of rules from the perspective of cryptographic technologies such as asymmetric encryption and time stamping. All participants must comply with this rules. And theese rules are transparent, and cannot be modified artificially. Therefore, without the endorsement of a third-party authority, it can also mobilize nodes across the network to jointly monitor, record all transactions, and publish them in the form of codes, effectively achieving valuable information transfer, solving or more precisely, greatly improving the trust problem between two unrelated strangers who do not trust each other. After all, trusting the objective technology is less risky than trusting a subjective individual.
1.2.2 Used to decide who is responsible for generating new blocks and maintaining effective unity in the blockchain system
On the other hand, in the blockchain system, due to the high network latency of the peer-to-peer network, the sequence of transactions observed by each node is different. To solve this, the consensus mechanism can be used to reach consensus on transactions order within a short period of time to decide who is responsible for generating new blocks in the blockchain system, and to maintain the effective unity of the blockchain.
1.3 The mainstream model of consensus algorithm
The blockchain system is built on the P2P network, and the set of all nodes can be recorded as PP, generally divided into ordinary nodes that produce data or transactions, and"miner" nodes (denoted as M) responsible for mining operations, like verifying, packaging, and updating the data generated by ordinary nodes or transactions. The functions of the two types of nodes may be overlapped; miner nodes usually participate in the consensus competition process in general, and will select certain representative nodes and replace them to participant in the consensus process and compete for accounting rights in specific algorithms. The collection of these representative nodes is recorded as DD; the accounting nodes selected through the consensus process are recorded as AA. The consensus process is repeated in accordance with the round, and each round of the consensus process generally reselects the accounting node for the round . The core of the consensus process is the "select leader" and "accounting" two parts. In the specific operation process, each round can be divided into four stages: Leader election, Block generation, Data validation and Chain updating namely accounting). As shown in Figure 1, the input of the consensus process is the transaction or data generated and verified by the data node, and the output is the encapsulated data block and updated blockchain. The four stages are executed repeatedly, and each execution round will generate a new block.
Stage 1: Leader election
The election is the core of the consensus process, that is, the process of selecting the accounting node AA from all the miner node sets MM: we can use the formula f(M)→f(M)→AA to represent the election process, where the function ff represents the specific implementation of the consensus algorithm. Generally speaking, |A|=1,|A|=1, that is, the only miner node is finally selected to keep accounts.
Stage 2: Block generation
The accounting node selected in the first stage packages the transactions or data generated by all nodes PP in the current time period into a block according to a specific strategy, and broadcasts the generated new block to all miner nodes MM or their representative nodes DD. These transactions or data are usually sorted according to various factors such as block capacity, transaction fees, transaction waiting time, etc., and then packaged into new blocks in sequence. The block generation strategy is a key factor in the performance of the blockchain system, and it also exposes the strategic behavior of miners such as greedy transactions packaging and selfish mining.
Stage 3: Verification
After receiving the broadcasted new block, the miner node MM or the representative node DD will verify the correctness and rationality of the transactions or data encapsulated in the block. If the new block is approved by most verification/representative nodes, the block will be updated to the blockchain as the next block.
Stage 4: On-Chain
The accounting node adds new blocks to the main chain to form a complete and longer chain from the genesis block to the latest block. If there are multiple fork chains on the main chain, the main chain needs to be based on the consensus algorithm judging criteria to choose one of the appropriate fork chain as the main chain.
Chapter 2 The Origin of Consensus Mechanism
2.1 The two armies problems and the Byzantium generals problem
2.1.1 The two armies


Figure 2 Schematic diagram of the two armed forces
Selected from Yuan Yong, Ni Xiaochun, Zeng Shuai, Wang Feiyue, "Development Status and Prospect of Blockchain Consensus Algorithm", Journal of Automation, 2018, 44(11): 2011-2022
As shown in the figure, the 1st and 2nd units of the Blue Army are stationed on two sides of the slope, and cannot communicate remotely between each other. While the White Army is just stationed in the middle of the two Blue Army units. Suppose that the White Army is stronger than either of the two Blue Army units, but it is not as strong as the two Blue Army units combined. If the two units of the Blue Army want to jointly attack the White Army at the same time, they need to communicate with each other, but the White Army is stationed in the middle of them. It is impossible to confirm whether the messengers of two Blue Army units have sent the attack signal to each other, let alone the tampering of the messages. In this case, due to the inability to fully confirm with each other, ultimately no effective consensus can be reached between the two Blue Army units, rendering the "paradox of the two armies".
2.1.2 The Byzantine generals problem


Figure 3 Diagram of the Byzantine generals' problem
Due to the vast territory of the Byzantine roman empire at that time, in order to better achieve the purpose of defense, troops were scattered around the empire, and each army was far apart, and only messengers could deliver messages. During the war, all generals must reach an agreement, or decide whether to attack the enemy based on the majority principle. However, since it is completely dependent on people, if there is a situation where the general rebels or the messenger delivers the wrong message, how can it ensure that the loyal generals can reach agreement without being influenced by the rebels is a problem which was called the Byzantine problem.
The two armies problems and the Byzantine generals problem are all elaborating the same problem: in the case of unreliable information exchange, it is very difficult to reach consensus and coordinate action. The Byzantine general problem is more like a generalization of the "paradox of the two armies".
From the perspective of the computer network, the two armies problem and the Byzantine problem are common contents of computer network courses: the direct communication between two nodes on the network may fail, so the TCP protocol cannot completely guarantee the consistence between the two terminal networks. However, the consensus mechanism can use economic incentives and other methods to reduce this uncertainty to a level acceptable to most people.
It is precisely because of the two armies problem and the Byzantine problem that the consensus mechanism has begun to show its value.
2.2 Development history of consensus mechanism
2.2.1 Classification of consensus mechanism
Because different types of blockchain projects have different requirements for information recording and block generation, and as the consensus mechanism improves due to the development of blockchain technology, there are currently more than 30 consensus mechanisms. These consensus mechanisms can be divided into two categories according to their Byzantine fault tolerance performance: Byzantine fault tolerance system and non-Byzantine fault tolerance system.

Table 1 Classification of consensus mechanism
Source: Yuan Yong, Ni Xiaochun, Zeng Shuai, Wang Feiyue, "Development Status and Prospect of Blockchain Consensus Algorithm"
2.2.2 Development frontier of consensus mechanism
-Development of consensus algorithm
According to the proposed time of the consensus algorithm, we can see relatively clearly the development of the consensus algorithm.
Source: Network data

Figure 4 Development frontier of consensus algorithm

Figure 5 Historical evolution of blockchain consensus algorithm
Source: Yuan Yong, Ni Xiaochun, Zeng Shuai, Wang Feiyue, "Development Status and Prospect of Blockchain Consensus Algorithm"
The consensus algorithm has laid the foundation for the blockchain consensus mechanism. Initially, the research of consensus algorithms was mainly used by computer scientists and computer professors to improve the spam problem or conduct academic discussions.
For example, in 1993, American computer scientist and Harvard professor Cynthia Dwork first proposed the idea of proof of work in order to solve the spam problem; in 1997, the British cryptographer Adam Back also independently proposed to solve the spam problem by use of the mechanism of proof of work for hashing cash and published officially in 2002; in 1999, Markus Jakobsson officially proposed the concept of "proof of work", which laid the foundation for the subsequent design of Satoshi Nakamoto's Bitcoin consensus mechanism.
Next lecture: Chapter 3 Detailed Explanation of Consensus Mechanism Technology
CelesOS
As the first DPOW financial blockchain operating system, CelesOS adopts consensus mechanism 3.0 to break through the "impossible triangle". It provides both high TPS and decentralization. Committed to creating a financial blockchain operating system that embraces regulation, providing services for financial institutions and the development of applications on the regulation chain, and developing a role and consensus eco-system regulation level agreement for regulation.
The CelesOS team is committed to building a bridge between blockchain and regulatory agencies / finance industry. We believe that only blockchain technology that cooperates with regulators will have a bright future and strive to achieve this goal.
📷Website
https://www.celesos.com/
📷 Telegram
https://t.me/celeschain
📷 Twitter
https://twitter.com/CelesChain
📷 Reddit
https://www.reddit.com/useCelesOS
📷 Medium
https://medium.com/@celesos
📷 Facebook
https://www.facebook.com/CelesOS1
📷 Youtube
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC1Xsd8wU957D-R8RQVZPfGA
submitted by CelesOS to u/CelesOS [link] [comments]

The strong case for Monero – fulfilling characteristics of the future currency

I wanted to write a short article about the distinct characteristics of Monero, some of which are absolutely necessities in any future currency looking to gaining serious user adoption. Together, these separate Monero quite distinctly from the rest of the crypto field.
This is certainly nothing new to the Monero seniors here, but it might contain some new perspectives, and also give an overview to the newer cryptofolk why Monero is quite unique -

1. Transactions are private by default
The sender, receiver and amount are all hidden in Monero. This is by default, as opposed to some other private cryptocurrencies, such as Zcash, where you can optionally make private transactions. As a result, most transactions in Zcash are transparent, which makes the actual anonymity set small.
In Bitcoin there is no real anonymity, because everything occurs in a transparent blockchain – the sender, receiver and amount are all public information. This has created a market for blockchain analysis, where companies keep track of the of transactions and make profit from this information. Furthermore, because the full history of sent and received Bitcoins and other transparent cryptocurrencies can be analyzed, the newly minted coins are generally more valuable than others. This phenomenon is called ‘taint’, and it exists only in transparent blockchains.
Besides speculative holding, no real-world use will emerge in any blockchain that is transparent. No company is prepared to publicly devolve how much, when and to which suppliers they send funds. Or vice versa, no company wants its competitors to know how many customers have paid them in the last quarter. Similarly, no sensible, privacy-valuing person should be willing to share his or her personal consuming habits with the whole world, forever.

2. Community-driven – no company, no CEO
Most understand cryptocurrencies are decentralized because different stakeholders all over the world participate in the process of mining, verifying and relying information from one stakeholder to another. It is practically impossible to stop this type of well distributed global network from operating.
The network topology, however, is only one part of the decentralization. If everything is controlled by a single entity, it creates a single point of failure. As an example, if everything is funded, developed and coordinated by a single company or a few companies, which funds can be seized, executives jailed and operations stopped, how secure is this cryptocurrency in the end? In Monero, there is no company, no CEO, no office. Everything is coordinated by members of the community, globally.

3. Emission is dis-inflationary and it reduces constantly
Monero’s emission, i.e. generation of new coins, reduces every block (2 minutes). In Bitcoin, the emission is reduced every four years. This causes sudden shocks to the Bitcoin ecosystem, because miners’ rewards are halved. Such a dramatic decrease will inevitably lead to some miners abandoning their mining activities. Because proof-of-work (POW) cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin and Monero rely on miners to secure the network, any significant decrease in mining is detrimental to the network’s security. On the other hand, the smoother emission in Monero makes mining activities more stable, which improves the security and trust of the whole system.
Another future-proofing factor in Monero is the tail emission, where the block reward will no longer decrease from 0.6 XMR after mid 2022. Minimum block reward incentives miners to continue mining even if the transaction fees do not cover all economic needs of the competing miners.
Comparing this to FIAT currencies, which are inflating 2-6 % each year, Monero’s inflation is asymptotically approaching 0 %. Even though new coins are generated by every block, the amount created per given time period remains constant after mid 2022. Contrast this to the FIAT systems, where the amount of new currency created is always increasing. Due to the compounding effect even moderate inflation in FIAT currencies causes considerable losses to all savers in medium and long term.

4. Block size is dynamic – it scales with number of transactions
Monero’s block size has no cap, which means the amount of transactions that can fit to the block is not limited. To prevent transaction spamming, preventive mechanisms have been built in the protocol.
Cryptocurrencies which implement a hard cap on the block size are susceptible to surging transactions fees. This occurs when there are simply too many transactions trying to make it into the block. Such a phenomenon occurred in Bitcoin during the peak of the last bull-run in January 2018, when the average transaction fees rose above $20.

5. Fair supply – no premine or developer tax
Supply mechanism and distribution are two elemental factors, which affect how capable the cryptocurrency is as a store of value (SOV). If a large majority of the future supply is held by a small group of people, it undermines the trust that the cryptocurrency keeps its value long term. If only a few stakeholders can massively increase the supply side of the market, the downward price risk becomes high. The more distributed the supply, the more stakeholders it takes to influence it.
Two practical implementations that undermine SOV in cryptocurrencies are premine and developer tax. In premine, the founders create a large initial amount of funds for themselves (or for their organization). Premining is an issue in some POW currencies and in all proof-of-stake (POS) cryptocurrencies, because their coin generation is not done by work. Developer tax is implemented in some POW currencies, where a portion of the block reward goes to the founders.

6. Crowdfunding and voluntarism as driving forces
Since the launch of Monero in 2014, all progression has been made by its rich and versatile community. Active members consist of several PhD researchers, developers, UX designers, translators and many other professionals of varying backgrounds. Much of the work has been made possible using crowdfunding, donors being individuals, investors and companies. Some members have participated even pro-bono, which further emphasizes the community’s trust in the project. The fact that the work is enabled by crowfunding and voluntarism is truly a strength, because it is difficult to stop ideology and people who want to be part of such force. This is in stark contrast to company-driven projects, which are much more susceptible to government oversight and control.

7. Mining is more sustainable
Monero’s mining algorithm, Random X, specifically targets general purpose CPUs and it is unsuitable to be mined with application-specific integrated circuits (ASICS). This greatly improves mining decentralization, because mining is feasible on data centers and personal computers. In Bitcoin and many other POW cryptocurrencies mining is only feasible with expensive ASICS, manufactured by just a few companies.
ASIC mined cryptocurrencies are problematic because there are very few companies specializing in mining equipment. Bitcoin’s largest ASIC manufacturer, Bitmain, has had overly much power in the ecosystem. They have stalled Bitcoin’s adoption, caused division among the community and even been one of the principal culprits for the past Bitcoin forks.
Another problem with ASIC manufacturers is their economic advantage over the rest of the mining field. ASIC manufacturers typically utilize their next generation products themselves and start selling them to the consumer market after their mining profits have reduced sufficiently due to the increasing competition. This makes normal miners second tier stakeholders in the ecosystem and it is a cause of further mining centralization.

8. Proven track record
Monero community has been working actively since its inception in 2014. Majority of the work has focused on research and development, with little efforts put to marketing. Unlike some other projects, especially those forked from Bitcoin, Monero project has an extensive technical skillset in its community and it has been one of the leading projects when it comes to both innovation and execution.
One of the Monero’s focus points is applied cryptographic research. Monero has implemented several advancements into the core protocol efficiently and with assurance. All major changes to the Monero protocol have been audited by some of the world’s leading companies specializing in cryptographic analysis, funded by the Monero community.
submitted by truther10 to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Tinfoil hat time... Don't take seriously, or do I guess. Whatever, I'm not your mother. This would make for a great story though.

The creator of the game, "Plague Inc" was interviewed for a CDC blog post from 2013.
How did you ensure it was a realistic game?
Without a medical background, I did a lot of online research in order to make sure it felt realistic to players. Luckily, I have always been very interested in biology as well as economics and current affairs. This helped a lot when I was building the algorithms and models inside the game. A critical stage in the game is the ‘Infection Cycle’ that dictates how people become infected with a disease and how they infect others. The game revolves around this stage, and I spent months making sure that it worked properly. The core design is based on the concept of ‘basic reproduction rate’ and I found lots of great papers online which taught me more about it.
What kind of audience does Plague Inc. reach and what do they get from it?
Plague Inc. has been downloaded over 10 million times worldwide and over 200 million games have been played to date. As an intelligent and sophisticated strategy game, I think Plague Inc. appeals to people looking for something more meaningful and substantial than the majority of mobile games. It makes people think about infectious disease in a new light – helping them realize the threats that we face every day.
Were players of Plague Inc. interested to know you had been invited to the CDC?
Yes, the reaction to the news has been extremely positive and people are keen to know more! In the first 24 hours after I announced my visit to the CDC almost 1 million people had seen tweets about it! I think people were excited to see that a prestigious organization like the CDC was interested in the game. A lot of people also hoped that visiting the CDC would give me ideas for future updates of the game (which it did!)
What did you learn at CDC?
It was fascinating to meet the people who are working hard every day to keep us safe from the type of threats that Plague Inc. features. I got a tour of the Emergency Operations Center and Broadcast Center, as well as a trip to the CDC museum. This gave me a lot of contextual information about how the CDC works, which will help me add a greater level of realism to the game in the future – especially in terms of how humanity reacts to outbreaks.
What are you working on now and what do you have coming out next?
Plague Inc. is still proving to be an incredibly popular game, so my main focus must be to keep improving the game and adding new content for players. Recently, I released an update that added a zombie-themed plague, as well as translating the game into four other languages. In the next update, I will be adding a new game mode for players, translating it into Japanese/Korean and hopefully adding some CDC content!
From this, we see that even before He went to the CDC over 200 million games had been played, and in the last 7 years, who knows how many more. Since 2013 he has taken highly detailed actual infectious disease data and implemented it into the game.
So at this point, we can assume that Plague Inc. It is a REALISTIC simulation, at least to a certain degree. Adding to this we know that hundreds of millions of simulations have been run. These simulations feature real-world decisions being made, realistic public events, and real sociological changes and variables. Even assuming the worst possible accuracy of the data(remember, companies like Twitter, Google, Facebook have no less than Ten Thousand data points on every US Citizen.), given enough time, a sufficiently robust deep learning AI can optimize this data to an extreme degree.
Let’s also assume that in addition to these PLAYER driven simulations, several AI-controlled simulations have been run as well. Not necessarily with Plague Inc.’s engine, but with Pandemic researchers. With this much data, it just makes sense that at some point this game would be able to not only model the “perfect virus” in order to infect a specific amount of people and cause a specific amount of symptoms. In addition, if the game uses actual virus genomics data, it could even, given enough time, develop the recipe to create this virus for us.
This isn’t even the extent of this AI possibility. Narrow, data-driven AIs are capable of crunching an obscene amount of data. And if you feed in the right data (GPS movements, Spending Habits, public reactions to public events and news stories, hell, I’m even sure memes could be effectively factored into these algorithms) these systems could very easily be linked together into a massive simulation that factors in and predicts all sorts of “likely eventualities”.
Brexit, Trump, Sanders, China, are all great examples of events that have an almost limitless amount of data points on the internet, all categorized by companies like Cambridge Analytica. Not only your reaction to the specific stimulus, but what you do after you've reacted to the stimulus, and how you react to that next stimulus, and so on and so on Ad Infinitum. Not to mention all the quizzes you’ve been filling out on Facebook, your Instagram account, your Spotify, your Tinder likes and dislikes and matches, YouTube and Pornhub browsing data all get fed into these systems. Ever wonder why Facebook and Amazon are making so much money? We can CLEARLY see that Billionaires run the world and can do ANYTHING they want right in front of us and they face ZERO consequences. Epstein didn't kill himself proved this. And Panama paper before that.
Hell Reddit accounts are the worst of the worst. Every time we upvote a meme, we are running calculations for these algorithms. We have become processing power for these AI Overlords. We willingly provide these companies with all of the data they need, they give us free smartphones and we welcome and integrate them into our daily lives. They listen to our conversations, and we are told that it is just for the mass aggregate data and that nobody actually listens to them. Humans don't listen to them, but Deep Learning Neural Nets certainly do. but forget about all the AI systems for a second. Collectively, the entire internet-connected totality of the human race is an actual computer.
If you think about how we all interact with each other in a single day, we can assume that most interactions function almost exactly like a math problem, just with a seemingly infinite amount of variables. Impossible to know that you said an innocuous thing that triggered the lady sitting next to you in some way that she was in a shitty mood for the rest of the day and ended up impulse buying $30 in lottery tickets. She was extremely rude to several people that day and acted like a typical "Karen" about it. All of this made a total of twenty-six people post funny statuses on Facebook or tweeted about her, which all were, to some varying degree of engagement, responded to and liked and emojied about. not to mention all the other interactions that took place in all that. Even if these AI algorithms miss seventy-five percent of all that sensory data and causal reasoning, we still make computations on that based on our own actions. The next time that lady sees that man in the coffee shop, she might remember the time she had a shitty day because of him. Then she iterates the loop again, adding more data to the pile... This process will inevitably guide not only each individual person to their own predictable outcomes, but humanity as a whole will eventually lead to some almost unavoidable outcome. We are a Neural Net running constantly. Our entire human race is working out calculations, and the interconnectedness of the world wide web has increased our processing power to effectively infinite levels. You know in "A Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy" where they make a computer that is as big as a planet, well, we ARE that computer. (a better example, in my opinion, is found in the book "Children of Time" where spoiler alert: A semi-sentient hivemind race of ants get turned into an actual computer that an uploaded human mind that became part of a possible already conscious AI system eventually gets transferred to where it becomes a sentient human/AI Hybrid spaceship made of ants piloted by a semi-symbiotic sentient Spider Human Alliance)
When asked how much data is on the internet, Google says:
"One way to answer this question is to consider the sum total of data held by all the big online storage and service companies like Google, Amazon, Microsoft and Facebook. Estimates are that the big four store at least 1,200 petabytes between them. That is 1.2 million terabytes (one terabyte is 1,000 gigabytes)."
That is 1.2 billion gigabytes. Just to put this into perspective, let's say your phone has 512GB, for every Gig of data you have on your phone, these companies have 2,343,750GB... or put another way... for every megabyte you have, these companies have 2,343.75 Gigs of data. We all create all the data they need to do pretty much anything conceivable given enough computing power.
Speaking of us collectively being a massive computing system... Do you know what else does an unfathomable amount of calculations per second? You, you guessed it, Bitcoin. Across all of the Bitcoin network, mining could easily be doing billions of calculations every second.
from bitcoinmining.com ”With Bitcoin, miners use special software to solve math problems and are issued a certain number of bitcoins in exchange. This provides a smart way to issue the currency and also creates an incentive for more people to mine.”
What math problems could these be working on? Without being able to look at the entirety of the math problems being worked out, it would be impossible to tell what they are working on. But imagine if these AI systems could distribute these ENORMOUSLY massive simulations on every single computer that is mining bitcoins, I think there would be enough data processing power do run something massive. Add in all the other Crypto mining and, well that's a lot of math. They aren't just doing your standard Multiplication tables either.
In conclusion, we absolutely are living in a simulation, just not how you think. There very well could be an extremely large number of simulations running, using REAL WORLD data to create predictive algorithms to not only predict outcomes but MANAGE them. i.e. what Cambridge Analytica did with Brexit and Trump. We know that this happened, and if that is possible, imagine what else could be possible to manufacture? One man can build a log cabin in ten days, ten men can build a log cabin in one day. And one computer can do a lot more math than ten people can...
TL;DR: Billionaires control the world using AI, and we are the operating system. We already live in the matrix, and it is too late to change anything about that.
GG no RE
submitted by LynxSys to China_Flu [link] [comments]

[Part - 31] Large college ebooks/eTextbooks thread for cheap rates [$4 to $25]

  1. American Government and Politics Today 2017-2018 Edition: The Essentials
  2. Algorithmic diagnosis of signs and symptoms
  3. American English Idiomatic Expressions part 2: English idioms and Phrases with
  4. ABC's of Relationship Selling through Service 12th edition
  5. Auditing & Assurance Services 7th Edition by Louwers
  6. AIDS: The Biological Basis 6th Edition
  7. Advertising: Concept and Copy 3E
  8. Analyzing Text and Discourse: Eight Approaches for the Social Sciences
  9. A Few Lessons for Investors and Managers From Warren Buffett – Peter Bevelin
  10. Applied Logistic Regression 3rd Edition
  11. American History: Connecting with the Past Volume 2 From 1865 15th Edition
  12. Accidental Orientalists: Modern Italian Travelers in Ottoman Lands
  13. Accounting for Non Specialists 7th Australian Edition - Test Bank
  14. Abnormal Psychology: An Integrative Approach 5th Canadian Edition
  15. American Politics Today Essentials 6th Edition
  16. Adobe Photoshop CC Classroom in a book 2017 release
  17. A+ Guide to IT Technical Support 9th Edition
  18. Armstrong's Handbook of Strategic Human Resource Management
  19. Applied State Estimation and Association
  20. Ageing and Pension Reform Around the World, Evidence from Eleven Countries
  21. A2-Level Maths for Edexcel - Core 4
  22. Adobe After Effects CC Classroom in a Book (2018 release
  23. An Introduction to Interdisciplinary Research: Theory and Practice
  24. A Companion to the Anthropology of Education 2016 version
  25. Art History 6th Edition by Marilyn Stokstad
  26. Archaeology Essentials: Theories, Methods, and Practice 3rd Edition
  27. Air Pollution Control Engineering 3rd Edition
  28. A Brief Guide to Writing from Readings 7th Edition
  29. Ayurvedic Tongue Diagnosis
  30. An Introduction to Geosynthetic Engineering - Sanjay Kumar Shukla
  31. A History of England, Volume 2
  32. A Short Course in Medical Terminology 3rd Edition
  33. Algebra and Trigonometry 10th Edition
  34. Acqua Alta: A Commissario Guido Brunetti Mystery (Commissario Brunetti Book 5)
  35. A Wellness Way of Life 11th Edition
  36. A Concise Introduction to Logic 13th Edition
  37. Amman Gulf Capital Identity and Contemporary Megaprojects
  38. American History: Connecting with the Past 15th edition
  39. A History of Infamy - Crime, Truth, and Justice in Mexico
  40. A Quick Reference to Business Analysis
  41. Applied Computational Aerodynamics: A Modern Engineering Approach
  42. An Introduction to Six Sigma and Process Improvement 2nd Edition
  43. A Guide tO SQL 9th Edition
  44. A-Level Business_ AQA Year 1 & 2 Complete Revision & Practice (CGP A-Level Business) - CGP Books
  45. Abnormal Psychology 8th Edition by Thomas Olttmans
  46. A Guide to MySQL (Sam 2010 Compatible Products)
  47. Alcoholism and the family a guide to treatment and prevention 2nd Edition
  48. Auditing and Assurance Services: Understanding the Integrated Audit
  49. Anatomy: An Essential Textbook - Latin Nomenclature
  50. Advanced Problems in Physical Chemistry For Competitive Examinations
  51. Acupuncture: An Anatomical Approach 2nd edition
  52. A Phonetics Workbook for Students: Building a Foundation for Transcription – Heidi
  53. Art-Museums - International Relations where we Least Expect IT
  54. An Introduction to Business Ethics 5th edition
  55. Andrews’ Diseases of the Skin: Clinical Atlas
  56. An Introduction to Project Management 6th Edition by Kathy Schwalbe
  57. A Concise Introduction to World Religion, 3rd Edition
  58. A Small Person Far Away
  59. Applied Statistics for Engineers and Physical Scientists 3rd Editio
  60. Applied Mineral Inventory Estimation
  61. Aging and The Life Course: An Introduction to Social Gerontology 6th Edition
  62. Analytics and Decision Support in Health Care Operations Management 3rd Edition
  63. Atlas of Anatomy, Latin Nomenclature 3rd Edition by Anne M Gilroy
  64. AQA GCSE Maths Higher Student Book
  65. Accounting Information Systems 8th Edition by James A. Hall
  66. Anthills of the Savannah
  67. Applied Statistics Using Stata: A Guide for the Social Sciences
  68. Analyzing Syntaxt: A Lexical-Fungtional Approach
  69. An Introduction To Law and Economics 5th Edition
  70. Art in Indonesia
  71. An Introduction to Drugs and the Neuroscience of Behavior
  72. Adult Development and Aging 8th Edition by John C. Cavanaugh
  73. A First Course in Probability 9th Edition
  74. A2-Level Maths Complete Revision & Practice - CGP Books
  75. A New History of Animation
  76. Administrative Law for Public Managers 2nd Edition
  77. ASTD Handbook for Workplace Learning Professionals- Elaine Biech
  78. Aphasia Rehabilitation Clinical Challenges
  79. Alloying: Understanding the Basics
  80. Advertising: An Integrated Marketing Communication Perspective 3rd Edition
  81. An Islandwide Struggle for Freedom
  82. American Jesus. How the Son of God Became a National Icon
  83. Accounting for Decision Making and Control 9th Edition
  84. Atlas of Anatomy 3rd Edition
  85. Admission Assessment Exam Review: HESI 4th Edition
  86. A2-Level Maths for Edexcel - Core 3 Student Book
  87. American Social Welfare Policy: A Pluralist Approach 7th Edition
  88. Advanced Practice Nursing: Essentials for Role Development 3rd Edition
  89. Affective Neuroscience: The Foundations of Human and Animal Emotions
  90. Advancing Your Career: Concepts of Professional Nursing 5th Edition
  91. Accounting for Non Specialists 7th Australian Edition
  92. American Politics Today Essentials 5th Edition
  93. Atkins' Physical Chemistry 11th Edition by Peter Atkins
  94. Against Individualism: A Confucian Rethinking of the Foundations of Morality, Politics, Family and Religion
  95. Advertising & IMC: Principles and Practice 10th Edition
  96. Aging and Older Adulthood 3rd Edition
  97. American Drama 1945 - 2000. An Introduction
  98. A Regional Geography of the United States and Canada Toward a Sustainable Future
  99. Anatomy & Physiology 6th Edition by Elaine N. Marieb
  100. A Force So Swift
  101. Android Programming for Beginners by John Horton
  102. Assessment of Communication Disorders in Adults
  103. Animal Rights Human Rights: Entanglements of Oppression and Liberation
  104. American Corrections 10th Edition
  105. Android Programming for Developers
  106. Advanced Engine Performance Diagnosis 6th Edition by James D. Halderman
  107. A History of Western Society Since 1300 11th Edition
  108. An Introduction to Management Science: Quantitative Approaches to Decision Making14th Edition
  109. Australian Intellectual Property Commentary Law and Practice 2nd Edition
  110. A Creative Approach to Music Fundamentals 11th Edition
  111. Advanced Screenwriting Raising Your Script to the Academy Award Level
  112. Arduino Project Handbook_ 25 Practical Projects to Get You Started - Mark Geddes
  113. A Dictionary of Science (Oxford - Jonathan Law
  114. And Then You're Dead: What Really Happens If You Get Swallowed by a Whale, Are Shot from a Cannon, or Go Barreling over Niagara
  115. America and its peoples: a mosaic in the making 4th Edition
  116. Analysis of Algorithms: An Active Learning Approach 2nd edition
  117. Adult Development and Aging: Biopsychosocial Perspectives, 5th Edition
  118. Auditing and Assurance Services 16th Edition
  119. An Introduction to the Human Services 8th Edition
  120. Animals and the Moral Community
  121. A Guide to Genetic Counseling 2nd Edition
  122. Arguing for Our Lives
  123. Analysis: With An Introduction to Proof 5th Edition
  124. Analysis: with an Introduction to Proof 5th Edition Solution Manual
  125. Art of Problem Solving Introduction to Algebra Textbook and Solutions Manual 2-Book Set
  126. Approaches to Early Childhood Education 6th Edition
  127. An Introduction to Moral Philosophy by Jonathan Wolff
  128. An introduction to formal languages and automata, 6th Edition
  129. Applying Career Development Theory to Counseling 6th Edition
  130. Abnormal psychology: neuroscience perspectives on human experience 2nd Edition
  131. Aircraft Propulsion and Gas Turbine Engines 2nd Edition
  132. An Introduction to Human Services: Policy and Practice 8th Edition
  133. Aspen Handbook for Legal Writers: A Practical Reference 4th Edition
  134. Armstrong's Handbook of Performance Management 6th Edition
  135. Americanah
  136. An Introduction to Brain and Behavior 5th Edition
  137. Abnormal Psychology: The Science and Treatment of Psychological Disorders 13th Edition
  138. Algebra for College Students 8th Edition
  139. Analysis of Electromagnetic Fields and Wave
  140. Adaptation in Metapopulations: How Interaction Changes Evolution
  141. African American Psychology: From Africa to America 3rd Edition
  142. A Collection of Ranter Writings
  143. A Good Country by Laleh Khadivi
  144. A History of the Roman People 6th Edition
  145. A Guide to Qualitative Field Research 2nd Edition
  146. A Comprehensive Guide to Daoist Nei Gong
  147. Algebra with trigonometry for college students 2nd Edition
  148. Advanced Accounting 12th Edition by Paul M. Fischer
  149. ADempiere 3.4 ERP Solutions
  150. Assessment, Measurement, and Prediction for Personnel Decisions, 2nd Edition
  151. AO Principles of Fracture Management 3rd Edition Volume 1 & 2
  152. ASP Safety Fundamentals Exam Secrets Study Guide: ASP Test Review for the Associate Safety Professional Exam
  153. A First Course in Differential Equation with Modeling Applications 11th Edition
  154. An Invitation to Health: The Power of Now Dianne Hales 17th Edition
  155. Arias Practical Guide to High Risk Pregnancy and Delivery 4th Edition
  156. A+ Guide to Hardware 9th Edition
  157. A Dictionary of Biology 7th Edition
  158. Autodesk Maya 2018: Basics Guide
  159. Accounting for Governmental & Nonprofit Entities 17th Edition
  160. An Introduction to the Profession of Social Work 6th Edition
  161. Absolute Java (Global Edition)
  162. A Cultural History of Food in the Medieval Age
  163. Always by Your Side by Gaynor Carrillo
  164. Analysis, Synthesis and Design of Chemical Processes 4th Edition
  165. Abernathy's Surgical Secrets 7th Edition
  166. An Invitation to Environmental Sociology 5th Edition
  167. Abnormal Psychology in a Changing World, 9th Edition
  168. Applied Longitudinal data analysis : modeling change and event occurrence
  169. An Introduction to Management Science: Quantitative Approaches to Decision Making 15th Edition
  170. Audio Power Amplifier Design 6th Edition
  171. Attention in a Social World
  172. Animal Behavior 11th edition
  173. Accounting Information Systems 13th Edition
  174. Alternating Projection Methods
  175. Advances in Accounting Behavioral Research - Volume 17
  176. Anatomy and Physiology: An Integrative Approach 3rd Edition
  177. A Place to Stand
  178. A Study Guide for Kate Chopin's "Story of an Hour"
  179. Authority and enterprise among the peoples of South Sulawesi : introduction – Roger
  180. Advancing Vocabulary Skills 3rd Edition
  181. Anatomy: A Photographic Atlas 8th Edition
  182. Adolescence 11th Edition
  183. Advanced Pediatric Assessment 2nd Edition
  184. Agile project management quickstart guide a simplified beginners guide to agile project Management
  185. An Introduction to Group Work Practice 8th Edition
  186. A Dialogue on Personal Identity and Immortality
  187. A Framework for Human Resource Management 7th Edition
  188. Accounting Information Systems, Global Edition, 14th Edition
  189. Applied Regression Analysis and Other Multivariable Methods 5th Edition
  190. Atlantic Africa and the Spanish Caribbean, 1570-1640 – David Wheat
  191. ACSM’s Exercise is MedicineTM: A Clinician’s Guide to Exercise Prescription
  192. AO Manual of Fracture Management: Internal Fixators: Concepts and Cases using LCP/LISS – Michael Wagner
  193. An Emotionally Focused Workbook for Couples: The Two of Us
  194. A Man and His Presidents: The Political Odyssey of William F. Buckley Jr
  195. Adobe LiveCycle Designer 2nd Edition
  196. A Temporary Gift by Asmaa Hussein
  197. A Novel Multi-Criteria Decision Making Model
  198. American College Slang for International Students
  199. Applying Political Theory: Issues and Debates 2nd Edition
  200. A Study Guide for Khaled Hosseini's "A Thousand Splendid Suns"
  201. Accessible American History: Connecting the Past to the Present 2nd Edition
  202. Algae-Based Biopharmaceuticals
  203. America’s History, Volume 2, 8th Edition
  204. Assessment for Reading Instruction, 3rd Edition
  205. America in European Consciousness, 1493-1750
  206. AS-Level Maths for Edexcel - Core 2 Student Book
  207. A History of Asia 7th Edition
  208. A Framework for Marketing Management 6th Edition
  209. Australian Political Institutions 10th Edition
  210. Artificial Intelligence: A Guide to Intelligent Systems 3rd Edition
  211. Absolute C++ 6th Edition by Walter Savitch
  212. Adult Learning: Linking Theory and Practice
  213. Advanced Practice Nursing: An Integrative Approach 5th Edition
  214. Analysing English Sentences 2nd Edition
  215. A2-Level Maths for Edexcel - Statistics 2 Student Book
  216. Attract, Engage & Retain Top Talent.50 Plus One Strategies
  217. Applied Mathematics for the Managerial, Life, and Social Sciences 7th Edition
  218. Activities, Games, and Assessment Strategies for the Foreign Language Classroom
  219. A Grammar of the Film - An Analysis of Film Technique
  220. A Practical Approach to Criminal Procedure 15th Edition
  221. Anatomy and Physiology: An Integrative Approach 2nd Edition
  222. Automotive Chassis Systems 7th Edition
  223. A History of European Literature: The West and the World from Antiquity to the Present
  224. American Government: Stories of a Nation
  225. Autocad Civil 3D 2010 Procedures and Application
  226. A History of Modern Psychology 11th Edition
  227. Aging in the Right Place
  228. Australian Intellectual Property Law 3rd Edition
  229. AS-Level Maths for Edexcel - Core 1
  230. ARE Secrets Study Guide: ARE Exam Review for the Architect Registration Examination
  231. Advanced Infrastructure Penetration Techniques
  232. Android Application Development Cookbook
  233. A World of Art, 8th Edition
  234. American Revolution Considered as a Social Movement
  235. A Lawyer Writes: A Practical Guide to Legal Analysis, 2nd Edition
  236. An Introduction to Environmental Sociology
  237. A Cultural History of Early Modern English Cryptography Manuals
  238. Applied Engineering Economics Using Excel by Merwan Mehta
  239. Advancing Your Career: Concepts of Professional Nursing 6th Edition
  240. An Architectural survey of Temples of Kerala – H. Sarkar
  241. Accident Investigation Techniques, 2nd Edition
  242. American Conservatism History: Theory and Practice
  243. Anti-pluralism: the real populist threat to liberal democracy
  244. Anthropology: The Human Challenge 15th Edition
  245. An Alternative History of Bicycles and Motorcycles: Two-Wheeled Transportation and Material Culture
  246. Adult Health Nursing 8th Edition
  247. Assessment in Counseling Procedures and Practices, 6th Edition
  248. Augmentative and Alternative Communication - Supporting Children and Adults with Complex Communication Needs 4th Edition
  249. ASTRO 3: Introductory Astronomy
  250. A Short Course in Photography: Digital 3rd Edition
  251. Advanced Accounting 13th Edition by Joe Ben Hoyle
  252. Abnormal Psychology, 10th Edition by Ronald J. Comer
  253. A modern epidemic: expert perspectives on obesity and diabetes - Amanda Sainsbury
  254. Automotive Vehicle Fire Analysis
  255. A Job to Love - The School of Life
  256. American Heathens: religion, race, and reconstruction in California – Joshua
  257. Applied Information Security: A Hands-on Guide to Information Security Software 2nd Edition
  258. Advanced Practice Nursing in the Care of Older Adults
  259. A+ Guide to Software 9th Edition
  260. Anatomy & Physiology: The Unity of Form and Function 7th Edition
  261. Acupuncture and Moxibustion - A Clinical Desk Reference
  262. A Visual Guide to Stata Graphics 3rd Edition
  263. A History of Modern Psychology, 4th Edition
  264. A New Reference Grammar of Mode 5th Edition
  265. Aphrodisiacs: The Science and the Myth - Taberner, Peter V.
  266. Advanced Practice Psychiatric Nursing, 2nd Edition
  267. A History of the World’s Religions 13th Edition
  268. A key to Whiteheads Process and reality
  269. Abnormal Psychology 17th Edition by James N. Butcher
  270. Aristophanes: Women at the Thesmophoria. Frogs
  271. Alcohol, Other Drugs, and Behavior: Psychological Research Perspectives 2nd Edition
  272. Applied Mechanics with solidworks by Godfrey Onwubolu
  273. An Introduction to MultiAgent Systems 2E
  274. ACSM's Exercise Management for Persons with Chronic Disease and Disabilities 4th Edition
  275. Art History Volume II 6th Edition
  276. Applied Survey Sampling
  277. A Process Theory of Organization
  278. A Practical Guide to Contemporary Pharmacy Practice and Compounding 4th Edition
  279. Anglicizing America
  280. Ability Profiling and School Failure - One Chid's Struggle to be Seen as Competent 2nd Edition
  281. Art: A Brief History 6th Edition
  282. A Critical Approach to Human Growth and Development
  283. An Introduction to Intercultural Communication: Identities in a Global Community 9th Edition
  284. An Introduction to Policing 8th Edition
  285. American Government and Politics Today 2017-2018 Edition
  286. Adolescence 10th Edition
  287. Adolescence and Emerging Adulthood: A Cultural Approach 6th Edition
  288. ATI TEAS Secrets Study Guide 6th Edition
  289. An Introduction to Behavioral Endocrinology, 5th Edition
  290. Atkinson and Hilgard’s Introduction to Psychology
  291. Art Law : A concise guide for artists, curators and art educators by Micheal E. Jones 2016 edition
  292. America, Past and Present Volume 1 10th Edition
  293. A Dictionary of Zoology
  294. A Topical Approach to Lifespan Development 8th Edition
  295. A Journey Around Our America
  296. Adaptable Interventions for Counseling Concerns - A step-by-step Clinical Workbook
submitted by TailExpert to CollegeTextbook [link] [comments]

The strong case for Monero – fulfilling characteristics of the future currency

I wanted to write a short article about the distinct characteristics of Monero, some of which are absolutely necessities in any future currency looking to gaining serious user adoption. Together, these separate Monero quite distinctly from the rest of the crypto field.
This is certainly nothing new to the seniors here, but it might contain some new perspectives, and also give an overview to the newer cryptofolk why Monero is quite unique -

1. Transactions are private by default
The sender, receiver and amount are all hidden in Monero. This is by default, as opposed to some other private cryptocurrencies, such as Zcash, where you can optionally make private transactions. As a result, most transactions in Zcash are transparent, which makes the actual anonymity set small.
In Bitcoin there is no real anonymity, because everything occurs in a transparent blockchain – the sender, receiver and amount are all public information. This has created a market for blockchain analysis, where companies keep track of the of transactions and make profit from this information. Furthermore, because the full history of sent and received Bitcoins and other transparent cryptocurrencies can be analyzed, the newly minted coins are generally more valuable than others. This phenomenon is called ‘taint’, and it exists only in transparent blockchains.
Besides speculative holding, no real-world use will emerge in any blockchain that is transparent. No company is prepared to publicly devolve how much, when and to which suppliers they send funds. Or vice versa, no company wants its competitors to know how many customers have paid them in the last quarter. Similarly, no sensible, privacy-valuing person should be willing to share his or her personal consuming habits with the whole world, forever.

2. Community-driven – no company, no CEO
Most understand cryptocurrencies are decentralized because different stakeholders all over the world participate in the process of mining, verifying and relying information from one stakeholder to another. It is practically impossible to stop this type of well distributed global network from operating.
The network topology, however, is only one part of the decentralization. If everything is controlled by a single entity, it creates a single point of failure. As an example, if everything is funded, developed and coordinated by a single company or a few companies, which funds can be seized, executives jailed and operations stopped, how secure is this cryptocurrency in the end? In Monero, there is no company, no CEO, no office. Everything is coordinated by members of the community, globally.

3. Emission is dis-inflationary and it reduces constantly
Monero’s emission, i.e. generation of new coins, reduces every block (2 minutes). In Bitcoin, the emission is reduced every four years. This causes sudden shocks to the Bitcoin ecosystem, because miners’ rewards are halved. Such a dramatic decrease will inevitably lead to some miners abandoning their mining activities. Because proof-of-work (POW) cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin and Monero rely on miners to secure the network, any significant decrease in mining is detrimental to the network’s security. On the other hand, the smoother emission in Monero makes mining activities more stable, which improves the security and trust of the whole system.
Another future-proofing factor in Monero is the tail emission, where the block reward will no longer decrease from 0.6 XMR after mid 2022. Minimum block reward incentives miners to continue mining even if the transaction fees do not cover all economic needs of the competing miners.
Comparing this to FIAT currencies, which are inflating 2-6 % each year, Monero’s inflation is asymptotically approaching 0 %. Even though new coins are generated by every block, the amount created per given time period remains constant after mid 2022. Contrast this to the FIAT systems, where the amount of new currency created is always increasing. Due to the compounding effect even moderate inflation in FIAT currencies causes considerable losses to all savers in medium and long term.

4. Block size is dynamic – it scales with number of transactions
Monero’s block size has no cap, which means the amount of transactions that can fit to the block is not limited. To prevent transaction spamming, preventive mechanisms have been built in the protocol.
Cryptocurrencies which implement a hard cap on the block size are susceptible to surging transactions fees. This occurs when there are simply too many transactions trying to make it into the block. Such a phenomenon occurred in Bitcoin during the peak of the last bull-run in January 2018, when the average transaction fees rose above $20.

5. Fair supply – no premine or developer tax
Supply mechanism and distribution are two elemental factors, which affect how capable the cryptocurrency is as a store of value (SOV). If a large majority of the future supply is held by a small group of people, it undermines the trust that the cryptocurrency keeps its value long term. If only a few stakeholders can massively increase the supply side of the market, the downward price risk becomes high. The more distributed the supply, the more stakeholders it takes to influence it.
Two practical implementations that undermine SOV in cryptocurrencies are premine and developer tax. In premine, the founders create a large initial amount of funds for themselves (or for their organization). Premining is an issue in some POW currencies and in all proof-of-stake (POS) cryptocurrencies, because their coin generation is not done by work. Developer tax is implemented in some POW currencies, where a portion of the block reward goes to the founders.

6. Crowdfunding and voluntarism as driving forces
Since the launch of Monero in 2014, all progression has been made by its rich and versatile community. Active members consist of several PhD researchers, developers, UX designers, translators and many other professionals of varying backgrounds. Much of the work has been made possible using crowdfunding, donors being individuals, investors and companies. Some members have participated even pro-bono, which further emphasizes the community’s trust in the project. The fact that the work is enabled by crowfunding and voluntarism is truly a strength, because it is difficult to stop ideology and people who want to be part of such force. This is in stark contrast to company-driven projects, which are much more susceptible to government oversight and control.

7. Mining is more sustainable
Monero’s mining algorithm, Random X, specifically targets general purpose CPUs and it is unsuitable to be mined with application-specific integrated circuits (ASICS). This greatly improves mining decentralization, because mining is feasible on data centers and personal computers. In Bitcoin and many other POW cryptocurrencies mining is only feasible with expensive ASICS, manufactured by just a few companies.
ASIC mined cryptocurrencies are problematic because there are very few companies specializing in mining equipment. Bitcoin’s largest ASIC manufacturer, Bitmain, has had overly much power in the ecosystem. They have stalled Bitcoin’s adoption, caused division among the community and even been one of the principal culprits for the past Bitcoin forks.
Another problem with ASIC manufacturers is their economic advantage over the rest of the mining field. ASIC manufacturers typically utilize their next generation products themselves and start selling them to the consumer market after their mining profits have reduced sufficiently due to the increasing competition. This makes normal miners second tier stakeholders in the ecosystem and it is a cause of further mining centralization.

8. Proven track record
Monero community has been working actively since its inception in 2014. Majority of the work has focused on research and development, with little efforts put to marketing. Unlike some other projects, especially those forked from Bitcoin, Monero project has an extensive technical skillset in its community and it has been one of the leading projects when it comes to both innovation and execution.
One of the Monero’s focus points is applied cryptographic research. Monero has implemented several advancements into the core protocol efficiently and with assurance. All major changes to the Monero protocol have been audited by some of the world’s leading companies specializing in cryptographic analysis, funded by the Monero community.
submitted by truther10 to Monero [link] [comments]

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Bitcoin is the electronic peer-to-peer currency, payment, and economic system first proposed by Nak amoto (2008) that has since its introduction attracted the attention of scholars and practitioners. Journal of Economic Perspectives—Volume 29, Number 2—Spring 2015—Pages 213–238 B itcoin is an online communication protocol that facilitates the use of a virtual currency, including electronic payments. Since its inception in 2009 by an anonymous group of developers (Nakamoto 2008), Bitcoin has served New Economic Perspectives. Dedicated to modern money theory (MMT) and policies to promote financial stability and the attainment of full employment. So you can see why you would very much like to be a miner in a thriving Bitcoin economy and why early adopters of Bitcoin are so fanatical about keeping the system going. are looking at Every Bitcoin is, in fact, unique, and has a different history, and if the history is meaningful to people, it may mean that my one Bitcoin is not the same as your one Bitcoin. And maybe I'm not willing to trade you, or maybe you're not willing to trade me, because one of us likes the history of the coin we currently have more than the history Reasons to Purchase Global Bitcoin Miner Market Report: 1. Current and future of Global Bitcoin Miner market outlook in the developed and emerging markets. 2. Analysis of various perspectives of the market with the help of Porter’s five forces analysis. 3. The segment that is expected to dominate the Global Bitcoin Miner market. 4.

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