Bitcoin Mining Software

Litecoin mining!

Since the litecoin community is growing, I've decided to introduce /litecoinmining, a place for all discussion revolving mining litecoins!
[link]

Something is rotten in the state of DOGE mining

Shibes, something stinks in doge land. A problem in the design of dogecoin means that dishonest (or perhaps we should call them "creative") miners can take a disproportionate share of rewards, leaving everyone else to earn less than they deserve. Many of you have probably noticed that calculators estimate payouts larger than what you earn in practice (for example, dustcoin estimates ~1500DOGE/day @ 200KH/s while Non Stop Mine pays about a quarter of that rate), and most have written it off as bad luck: the blocks your pool found happened to be small, or your pool happened to be unlucky, and such is life. At least another friendly Shibe is having a better day, and it'll come around in tips anyway! Unfortunately, the truth is much darker.
The "random" DOGE rewards per block are not random. In fact, the value of each block is predetermined by a simple equation applied to the hash of the previous block. A creative miner can take advantage of this fact to mine dogecoin when the potential reward is high, and switch to litecoin when the potential reward is low. During some rounds, the reward is so small it isn't worth the electricity spent finding it; during more rounds, the reward is less than can be earned mining LTC; in a few rounds, the reward is spectacular. Honest miners mine with the expectation of earning an average of 500,000 DOGE per block, but when people are selectively mining the high-profit DOGE rounds, the average reward falls for honest miners.
So the question is: is this problem theoretical, or are honest miners really losing value to cheaters? I spent some time digging, and it appears that cheating is rampant! There are a few ways cheating can be detected.
If there is outside competition for high-value blocks, then pools should on average be finding blocks worth less than 500,000 DOGE (because some of the valuable blocks, but none of the low-value blocks, will be found by cheaters). The largest pool, Dogehouse, reports some useful averages: over all time, the pool has found 11,241 valid blocks worth 5365077071.0746 DOGE, for an average of 477,277 DOGE (including fees, which should actually raise the average above 500,000!). That's 4.5% below the expected average block value. Is it simply bad luck? No. With so many blocks found, there's about a 7% chance that the average will be above 505,000 or below 495,000; there's a <<1% chance their average will be above 510,000 or below 490,000, and effectively NO chance of seeing an average below 485,000. 477,000 is simply preposterous. Dogepool is either mind-bogglingly unlucky, or something is fishy.
Maybe Dogehouse is doing something fishy...but we can look at other pools. Dogechain's pool's all-time average block value is similar: 478847 DOGE. They're a smaller pool so the odds of this being bad luck aren't astronomical, but it's not very likely. Fast-pool's average is 477892. They're big enough that the odds are again astronomical.
And this only accounts for people cheating outside of the pools. Cheaters can operate inside our pools (more on this later)!
Maybe there's something wrong with the pools. They mostly run similar software. All their owners could be lying to us. We can check for signs of cheating independent of the pools: if more people are mining high-value blocks than low-value blocks, the hash-rate will be higher when the next block is high-value, so high-value blocks will be found faster than low-value blocks. Here's what you find if you look at 5000 recent blocks (blocks 80,001 to 85,000) and measure the average time to find a block, broken out by the block value:
I had to drop about 50 blocks which were missing good timestamps, but they're evenly distributed and shouldn't skew the averages.
The pattern is clear: the network is finding high-value blocks significantly faster than low-value blocks. Low-value rounds take as much as 10% longer than intended, and high-value rounds take around 5% less time than intended. Significant hashrate belongs to miners that cheat.
I mentioned cheaters can operate inside our pools. The payment algorithms used by most pools were carefully designed for bitcoin's (effectively) fixed block reward. They reliably protect against cheaters trying to hop in and out of pools based on short-term profitability, by making payouts solely dependent on the unknowable future (the straightforward pool payment schemes allow cheaters to look at a pool's recent history and use that to take an unfair share of its earnings; read this awesome paper for details). Since the future reward for a bitcoin pool is completely unknowable, PPLNS does not protect against a hopper who knows the future. In the case of Dogecoin, the future reward IS knowable, and PPLNS offers no protection.
Dogehouse is so big we can reasonably assume they'll find any particular block. Dogehouse is using a PPLNS target similar to an ordinary round's length. Someone who mines only during high-value rounds will, with high confidence, earn significantly more DOGE per share submitted than someone who mines Dogecoin 24/7. They also experience much lower variance in earnings.
The random block reward size needs to be removed. It's fun, but it rewards cheaters. Developing a more secure random block value selection technique is possible, but based on observations of GitHub, I do not trust the Dogecoin creator to get it right. Even subtle errors re-open the opportunity for cheating.
While I believe cheating is already unacceptably common, many will disagree until it worsens. To force the issue, I've included everything you need to join the cheaters.
Patch dogecoin/src/main.cpp:
diff --git a/src/main.cpp b/src/main.cpp index 2af23af..8c32dad 100644 --- a/src/main.cpp +++ b/src/main.cpp @@ -1794,6 +1794,8 @@ bool CBlock::ConnectBlock(CValidationState &state, CBlockIndex* pindex, CCoinsVi prevHash = pindex->pprev->GetBlockHash(); } +fprintf(stdout, "Next block value: %lld\n", GetBlockValue(pindex->nHeight, 0, GetHash())); +fflush(stdout); if (vtx[0].GetValueOut() > GetBlockValue(pindex->nHeight, nFees, prevHash)) return state.DoS(100, error("ConnectBlock() : coinbase pays too much (actual=%"PRI64d" vs limit=%"PRI64d")", vtx[0].GetValueOut(), GetBlockValue(pindex->nHeight, nFees, prevHash))); 
Perl script to control cgminer:
#!/usbin/perl use strict; use warnings; my $ltcMiner = "192.168.1.1 4029"; my $dogeMiner = "192.168.1.1 4028"; open (INSTREAM, "dogecoind|") or die; my $lastPool = 0; # LTC while (my $line = ) { if ($line =~ /Next block value: ([\d].*)/) { my $val = $1; if ($val >= 70000000000000) { # High-value DOGE round if ($lastPool == 0) { # Switch from LTC to DOGE $lastPool = 1; &onoff($dogeMiner, "en"); &onoff($ltcMiner, "dis"); } else { # Already mining DOGE } } elsif ($lastPool == 1) { # Low-value DOGE round and currently mining DOGE $lastPool = 0; print " Switching to LTC\n"; &onoff($ltcMiner, "en"); &onoff($dogeMiner, "dis"); } else { # Low-value DOGE round; already mining LTC anyway } } } close (INSTREAM); exit; sub onoff { my $miner = shift; my $enDis = shift; open (OUT1, "|nc $miner") or die $!; print OUT1 "gpu${enDis}able|0"; close (OUT1); } 
Then, simply run two instances of cgminer with separate API ports, one configured for LTC and the other configured for DOGE.
submitted by DisappointedShibe to dogemining [link] [comments]

New people please read this. [upvote for visibility please]

I am seeing too many new people come and and getting confused. Litecoin wiki isn't the greatest when it comes to summing up things so I will try to do things as best as I can. I will attempt to explain from what I have learned and answer some questions. Hopefully people smarter than me will also chime in. I will keep this post updated as much as I can.
Preface
Litecoin is a type to electronic currency. It is just like Bitcoin but it there are differences. Difference explained here.
If you are starting to mine now chances are that you have missed the Bitcoin mining train. If you really want your time and processing power to not go to waste you should mine LTC because the access to BTC from there is much easier.
Mining. What is it?
Let's get this straight. When making any financial commitment to this be prepared to do it with "throw away" money. Mining is all about the hashrate and is measured in KH/s (KiloHash/sec). Unlike the powerful ASICs (Application Specific Integrated Circuit) that are used to mine bitcoins using hashrates in the GH/s and even TH/s, litecoin mining has only been able to achieve at the very best MH/s. I think the highest I've seen is 130 MH/s so far. Which leads us to our next section.
Mining Hardware
While CPU mining is still a thing it is not as powerful as GPU mining. Your laptop might be able to get 1 a month. However, I encourage you to consult this list first. List of hardware comparison You will find the highest of processors can maybe pull 100 KH/s and if we put this into a litecoin mining calculator it doesn't give us much.
Another reason why you don't want to mine with your CPU is pretty simple. You are going to destroy it.
So this leaves us with GPUs. Over the past few months (and years) the HD 7950 has been the favourite because it drains less power and has a pretty good hashrate. But recently the introduction of the R9 290 (not the x) has changed the game a bit. People are getting 850 KH/s - 900 KH/s with that card. It's crazy.
Should I mine?
Honestly given the current difficulty you can make a solid rig for about $1100 with a hashrate of 1700 KH/s which would give you your investment back in about a month and a half. I am sure people out there can create something for much cheaper. Here is a good example of a setup as suggested by dystopiats
PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks
Type Item Price
CPU AMD Sempron 145 2.8GHz Single-Core Processor $36.01 @ Amazon
Motherboard ASRock 970 EXTREME4 ATX AM3+ Motherboard $99.48 @ OutletPC
Memory Crucial Ballistix Tactical Tracer 4GB (1 x 4GB) DDR3-1866 Memory $59.99 @ Newegg
Video Card Sapphire Radeon HD 7950 3GB Video Card (3-Way CrossFire) $245.38 @ Newegg
Video Card Sapphire Radeon HD 7950 3GB Video Card (3-Way CrossFire) $245.38 @ Newegg
Video Card Sapphire Radeon HD 7950 3GB Video Card (3-Way CrossFire) $245.38 @ Newegg
Power Supply SeaSonic Platinum 860W 80+ Platinum Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply $146.98 @ SuperBiiz
Total
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available. $1078.60
Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-11-29 00:52 EST-0500
Estimated Hashrate (with GPU overclocking) : 1900 KH/s
Hardware Fundamentals
CPU - Do you need a powerful CPU? No but make sure it is a decent one. AMD CPUs are cheap to buy right now with tons of power. Feel free to use a Sempron or Celeron depending on what Motherboard you go with.
RAM - Try to get at least 4 GB so as to not run into any trouble. Memory is cheap these days. I am saying 4 GB only because of Windoze. If you are plan to run this on Linux you can even get away with less memory.
HDD Any good ol 7200 RPM hard drive will do. Make sure it is appropriate. No point in buying a 1TB hard drive. Since, this is a newbie's guide I assumed most won't know how to run linux, but incase you do you can get a USB flash drive and run linux from it thus removing the need for hard drive all toghether. (thanks dystopiats)
GPU - Consult the list of hardware of hardware I posted above. Make sure you consider the KH/s/W ratio. To me the 290 is the best option but you can skimp down to 7950 if you like.
PSU - THIS IS BLOODY IMPORTANT. Most modern GPUs are power hungry so please make sure you are well within the limits of your power consumption.
MOTHERBOARD - Ok, so a pretty popular board right now is Gigabyte GA-990FXA-UD3 and the ASRock 970 Extreme4. Some people are even going for Gigabyte GA-990FXA-UD5 and even the mighty Gigabyte GA-990FXA-UD7 because it has more PCI-E slots. 6 to be exact. However you may not need that much. With risers you can get more shoved into less.
PCI-E RISERS - These are called risers. They come in x16 to x16 and x1 to x16 connections. Here is the general rule of thumb. This is very important. Always get a POWERED riser otherwise you will burn a hole in your MoBo. A powered rise as a molex connector so that additional power from PSU can be supplied.
When it comes to hardware I've provided the most basic knowledge you need. Also, take a look at cryptobader's website. This is very helpful. Please visit the mining section of Litecoin Forums and the litecoinmining subreddit for more indepth info.
Mining Software
Now that you have assembled your hardware now you need to get into a pool. But before you do that you need a mining software. There are many different ones but the one that is most popular is cgminer. Download it and make sure you read the README. It is a very robust piece of software. Please read this if you want to know more. (thanks BalzOnYer4Head)
Mining Pools
Now that your hardware and software is ready. I know nothing about solo mining other than the fact that you have to be very lucky and respectable amount of hashing power to decrypt a block. So it is better to join pools. I have been pool hopping for a bit and really liked give-me-coin previously known to the community as give-me-ltc. They have a nice mobile app and 0% pool fees. This is really a personal preference. Take a look at this list and try some yourself.
How do I connect to a pool?
Most pools will give you a tutorial on how to but the basics are as follows:
  • Signup for a pool
  • Create a worker for your account. Usually one worker per rig (Yes people have multiple rigs) is generally a good idea.
  • Create a .run file. Open up notepad and type cgminer.exe -o (address_to_the_miningpool:port_number) -u (yourusername.workername) -p (your_worker_password_if_you_made_one). Then File>Save As>runcgminer.run (Make sure the drop down is set to "All Files" and .txt document.) and save in the same folder as cgminer. That's it.
  • Double click on runcgminer.run (or whatever you named it) and have fun mining.
Mining Profitability
This game is not easy. If it was, practically everyone would be doing it. This is strictly a numbers game and there are calculations available that can help you determine your risk on your investments. 4 variables you need to consider when you are starting to mine:
Hardware cost: The cost of your physical hardware to run this whole operation.
Power: Measured in $/KwH is also known as the operating cost.
Difficulty rate: To put it in layman's terms the increase in difficulty is inversely proportional to amount of coin you can mine. The harder the difficulty the harder it is to mine coin. Right now difficulty is rising at about 18% per 3 days. This can and will change since all you miners are soon going to jump on the band wagon.
Your sanity: I am not going to tell you to keep calm and chive on because quiet frankly that is stupid. What I will tell you not to get too carried away. You will pull you hair out. Seriously.
Next thing you will need is a simple tool. A mining profitability calculator. I have two favourite ones.
coinwarz
I like this one cause it is simple. The fields are self explanatory. Try it.
bitcoinwisdom
I like this one because it is a more real life scenario calculator and more complicated one (not really). It also takes increasing difficulty into account.
Please note: This is the absolute basic info you need. If you have more questions feel free to ask and or google it!
More Below.
submitted by craeyon to litecoin [link] [comments]

The Concept of Bitcoin

The Concept of Bitcoin
https://preview.redd.it/5r9soz2ltq421.jpg?width=268&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=6a89685f735b53ec1573eefe08c8646970de8124
What is Bitcoin?
Bitcoin is an experimental system of transfer and verification of property based on a network of peer to peer without any central authority.
The initial application and the main innovation of the Bitcoin network is a system of digital currency decentralized unit of account is bitcoin.
Bitcoin works with software and a protocol that allows participants to issue bitcoins and manage transactions in a collective and automatic way. As a free Protocol (open source), it also allows interoperability of software and services that use it. As a currency bitcoin is both a medium of payment and a store of value.
Bitcoin is designed to self-regulate. The limited inflation of the Bitcoin system is distributed homogeneously by computing the network power, and will be limited to 21 million divisible units up to the eighth decimal place. The functioning of the Exchange is secured by a general organization that everyone can examine, because everything is public: the basic protocols, cryptographic algorithms, programs making them operational, the data of accounts and discussions of the developers.
The possession of bitcoins is materialized by a sequence of numbers and letters that make up a virtual key allowing the expenditure of bitcoins associated with him on the registry. A person may hold several key compiled in a 'Bitcoin Wallet ', 'Keychain' web, software or hardware which allows access to the network in order to make transactions. Key to check the balance in bitcoins and public keys to receive payments. It contains also (often encrypted way) the private key associated with the public key. These private keys must remain secret, because their owner can spend bitcoins associated with them on the register. All support (keyrings) agrees to maintain the sequence of symbols constituting your keychain: paper, USB, memory stick, etc. With appropriate software, you can manage your assets on your computer or your phone.
Bitcoin on an account, to either a holder of bitcoins in has given you, for example in Exchange for property, either go through an Exchange platform that converts conventional currencies in bitcoins, is earned by participating in the operations of collective control of the currency.
The sources of Bitcoin codes have been released under an open source license MIT which allows to use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or sell copies of the software, subject to insert a copyright notice into all copies.
Bitcoin creator, Satoshi Nakamoto
What is the Mining of bitcoin?
Technical details :
During mining, your computer performs cryptographic hashes (two successive SHA256) on what is called a header block. For each new hash, mining software uses a different random number that called Nuncio. According to the content of the block and the nonce value typically used to express the current target. This number is called the difficulty of mining. The difficulty of mining is calculated by comparing how much it is difficult to generate a block compared to the first created block. This means that a difficulty of 70000 is 70000 times more effort that it took to Satoshi Nakamoto to generate the first block. Where mining was much slower and poorly optimized.
The difficulty changes each 2016 blocks. The network tries to assign the difficulty in such a way that global computing power takes exactly 14 days to generate 2016 blocks. That's why the difficulty increases along with the power of the network.
Material :
In the beginning, mining with a processor (CPU) was the only way to undermine bitcoins. (GPU) graphics cards have possibly replaced the CPU due to their nature, which allowed an increase between 50 x to 100 x in computing power by using less electricity by megahash compared to a CPU.
Although any modern GPU can be used to make the mining, the brand AMD GPU architecture has proved to be far superior to nVidia to undermine bitcoins and the ATI Radeon HD 5870 card was the most economical for a time.
For a more complete list of graphics cards and their performance, see Wiki Bitcoin: comparison of mining equipment
In the same way that transition CPU to GPU, the world of mining has evolved into the use of the Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA) as a mining platform. Although FPGAs did not offer an increase of 50 x to 100 x speed of calculation as the transition from CPU to GPU, they offered a better energy efficiency.
A typical HD/s 600 graphics card consumes about 400w of power, while a typical FPGA device can offer a rate of hash of 826 MH/s to 80w of power consumption, a gain of 5 x more calculations for the same energy power. Since energy efficiency is a key factor in the profitability of mining, it was an important step for the GPU to FPGA migration for many people.
The world of the mining of bitcoin is now migrating to the Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC). An ASIC is a chip designed specifically to accomplish a single task. Unlike FPGAs, an ASIC is unable to be reprogrammed for other tasks. An ASIC designed to undermine bitcoins cannot and will not do anything else than to undermine bitcoins.
The stiffness of an ASIC allows us to offer an increase of 100 x computing power while reducing power consumption compared to all other technologies. For example, a classic device to offer 60 GH/s (1 hashes equals 1000 Megahash. 1GH/s = 1000 Mh/s) while consuming 60w of electricity. Compared to the GPU, it is an increase in computing power of 100 x and a reduction of power consumption by a factor of 7.
Unlike the generations of technologies that have preceded the ASIC, ASIC is the "end of the line" when we talk about important technology change. The CPUs have been replaced by the GPUs, themselves replaced by FPGAs that were replaced by ASICs.
There is nothing that can replace the ASICs now or in the immediate future. There will be technological refinements in ASIC products, and improvements in energy efficiency, but nothing that may match increased from 50 x to 100 x the computing power or a 7 x reduction in power consumption compared with the previous technology.
Which means that the energy efficiency of an ASIC device is the only important factor of all product ASIC, since the estimated lifetime of an ASIC device is superior to the entire history of the mining of bitcoin. It is conceivable that a purchased ASIC device today is still in operation in two years if the unit still offers a profitable enough economic to keep power consumption. The profitability of mining is also determined by the value of bitcoin but in all cases, more a device has a good energy efficiency, it is profitable.
Software :
There are two ways to make mining: by yourself or as part of a team (a pool). If you are mining for yourself, you must install the Bitcoin software and configure it to JSON-RPC (see: run Bitcoin). The other option is to join a pool. There are multiple available pools. With a pool, the profit generated by any block generated by a member of the team is split between all members of the team. The advantage of joining a team is to increase the frequency and stability of earnings (this is called reduce the variance) but gains will be lower. In the end, you will earn the same amount with the two approaches. Undermine solo allows you to receive earnings huge but very infrequent, while miner with a pool can offer you small stable and steady gains.
Once you have your software configured or that you have joined a pool, the next step is to configure the mining software. The software the most populare for ASIC/FPGA/GPU currently is CGminer or a derivative designed specifically for FPGAS and ASICs, BFGMiner.
If you want a quick overview of mining without install any software, try Bitcoin Plus, a Bitcoin minor running in your browser with your CPU. It is not profitable to make serious mining, but it is a good demonstration of the principle of the mining team.
submitted by Josephbitcoin to u/Josephbitcoin [link] [comments]

To arms Bitcoin community! Help us to complete this mining installation for the Zürich MoneyMuseum. We are not asking for funds. Only your expertise needed! 20$ tip if you give us the relevant clue to solve or mitigate our main problem. Nice pictures of the exhibition inside as well…

Edit:
A big thank you to all people who helped us we can now mine true pps with diff1! The people in this thread which have helped most have been awarded. I want to mention also the operator of btcmp.com denis2342 and Luke-Jr.
Actually looking at the miner screen in the Linux terminal helped a lot ;-). The pool constantly resigned to stratum with variable difficulty. We can now mine true pps with diff1. Getwork with long polling seems to be default after disabling stratum...
We will probably post again, when there is a video of the installation in action...
Again many thanks. Learned a lot.
Edit: Thank you for all the answeres so far! We will try different things now and report back. Tip bounty will be distrubuted as soon as we found out what finally does the trick. Ths could take a few days. The offerd tip will be distributed and very likeley a few others as well.
First of all, let me tell you that the Bitcoin Exhibition at the Zürich MoneyMuseum is most likely the biggest and most diverse of it’s kind. Please read more about the museum and the exhibition below.
Help us solve the following problem we experience with our “Muscle Powered Proof of Work” installation:
Me and a friend have invested a lot of time to build an installation for the Museum. It is basically a 10GHash/s miner and RapberryPi which is powered by a hand generator (Maxon DC motor with planetary gear). Here are some pictures of the installation, although not entirely put together yet. There are still some changes planned.
https://www.dropbox.com/sh/0qcvl3wu4romhnt/AAAYF08lnVAy6W6KEepE7e2Ua?dl=0
Now let’s get to the core of our problem:
We are mining at the getwork diff1 pool btcmp.com as it is a true pps pool with getwork diff1. The visitors in the museum can power the generator for 2-3min and see directly how many Satoshis the "network" (actually pool but we don't want to confuse the visitors to much at that point) has given the museum for their work. This all works well so far but one problem remains. Sometimes the pool does not get a share from us for more than 40 seconds or even more than 60 in some cases. I have calculated that with 8.4 GHash/s we should find a share about every 0.5 seconds in average (diff1). I think when the pool gets a share it gets all the hashes as it then accounts for several Satoshis. Statistically we get per minute what we should get in theory. We would very much like to lower the time between the accepted shares by the pool, however. This would help to make the overall experience much smoother for the visitors.
Please look at this screenshot from MinePeon and answer some questions:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/lb1jei4trc9kqe5/MinePeonScreenshot.png?dl=0
We see that we get a lot of diff1 hashes. However, only 11 shares/packages have been accepted. The Is there a possibility to set the miner SW so it submits to the pool as soon as a share is found? It seems to send them in packages which sometimes have 4-5 seconds in between but sometimes a much as 80 seconds. I would like to submit packages of hashes much more often. How can this be influenced?
What exactly are the Getworks (GW)?
What exactly are the Accepted ones (Acc)? This is where the TipBounty is. Help us to get a better Acc/diff1 ratio. Best would be 1:1.
What exactly are the rejected ones (Rej)?
What exactly are the discarded ones (Disc)?
What exactly are the difficulty one hashes (diff1)?
Now some of these questions seem very very basic but it is important for us to understand what these are and how we can influence these. We have a 1:1 correlation between the Acc and the pool side acknowledgement of shares/packages. So whenever the MinePeon shows one more for this value the pool value for last submitted share goes to “moments ago”.
Does the miner SW have a setting where we can set after how many diff1 hashes a package of hashes is sent to the pool? If no, do you have another idea why so few are sent? Ideally we would set it so the diff1 hashes are sent every 5 seconds or so, probably even more often.
Is stratum with fixed diff1 possible? If so, would it be better to use stratum?
Are there critical settings if we should know of? (we have tried --request-diff and --no-submit-stale)
We are using BFGMiner on MinePeon if that matters. We could switch to CGMiner if that would help. Any help is very much appreciated. The museum is doing a great job explaining Bitcoin basics. We had special focus on interactive learning and have several things to underline this.
I hope to hear back from you so we can improve our installation. Please don't hesitate to ask if you have further questions. We are both not mining experts.
Thanks for reading and AMA.
SimonBelmond
Current features of the Bitcoin exhibition at the Zürich MoneyMuseum:
Current Features:
  • Life screen with various stats/charts/parameters/transactions…
  • Printed infographics.
  • Muscle powered PoW: Hand generator with 5v and 3.5-5A output, Raspberry Pi, MinePeon, 5x Antminer U2+ plus a screen to show the hash-rate at the pool and/or in MinePeon web interface. This screen will not be hand powered. This installation will complement their coining die (go to 1:27 to see what I mean).
  • The Bitcoin mining evolution (CPU, GPU, FPGA, ASIC)
  • A few short (2-3 minutes) interviews.
  • Other wallets, Trezor, PiperWallet
  • ATM Prototype, functional
  • MoneyMuseum Bit-Cards
  • PiperWallet to use.
  • Casascius and other physical Bitcoins, Wallets (also some commemorative coins), Paper wallet like one out of the first Bitcoin (A)TM ever
  • Bitcoin Quiz
  • 12 Picture tours
    • Bitcoin for beginners
    • Bitcoin advanced
    • Debunking 13 Bitcoin myths
    • What you definitely have to know
    • The history of Bitcoin
    • Bitcoin und traditional forms of money
    • Alternatives to Bitcoin
    • Citations about Bitcoin
    • How do I open an account?
    • How do I get Bitcoin?
    • Bitcoin community and economy
    • Bitcoin as a platform
I see this as a good opportunity for Bitcoin, so let’s embrace it. I am especially excited to compare the traditional forms of money which used proof of work to the new money which also uses proof of work. I think in that context it will be much easier for the visitors to value this concept.
A lot of schools and other groups book guided tours at the museum. It is open on every Friday from December 05. On. Entry is free of charge.
Edit:Markdown, typos
submitted by SimonBelmond to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Guide For New Shibes

So it has become apparent to me from the constant questions on this subreddit that a lot of new miners/shibes need help, so I have decided to make a basic guide to most of the questions I see a lot here.
1) BTC - This means Bitcoin so If you see a miner that says BTC it does not work with dogecoin because dogecoin is Scrypt.
2) Scrypt - This is what dogecoin runs off of, or what your computeasic/gpu solves to support the network.
3) Asic - This stands for an application-specific integrated circuit, or in less confusing terms a miner dedicated completely to mining a particular type of coin such as dogecoin.
4) GPU Mining - Using a graphics card to mine crypto currencies.
5) CPU Mining - A slow and inefficient way of using your computers Central Processing Unit to mine crypto currencies.
6) Hash Rate - The rate at which you mine a crypto currency. The higher the better.
7) KH - This Means Kilo Hashes. 1KH = 1,000 Hashes a Second
8) MH - This Means Mega Hash - 1 MH = 1,000,000 hashes a second.
9) Should I buy an asic? - If you want to support the network yes. If you want to solely make money off of it No. Buy the coin if you want to make profit. This is my opinion, there is no one answer to this question.
10) Mining Pool - Pooled mining is a mining approach where multiple generating clients contribute to the generation of a block, and then split the block reward according the contributed processing power. Pooled mining effectively reduces the granularity of the block generation reward, spreading it out smoothly over time.
Tl/DR You Work with other miners to solve stuff faster making you money faster.
11) Mining Difficulty - How hard it is to solve the problems to generate dogecoin.
12) Do I need a fan? - Yes I cannot stress how important it is to properly cool your units. Make sure your units are always cool or else they might melt. Do not think you are safe just because you turn your ac up, but a fan.
13) What Mining Pool Should I Pick? - Here is a list of all of the pools Pick one that works for you.
14) What is a wallet? - This is where you store your dogecoin and where you can send and receive dogecoin.
15) What Wallet Should I get? - Online is convenient but not safe. Paper Is the Safest But Not convenient. Cold Storage is the mostly safe and somewhat convenient.
16) What is cold storage? - Basically putting your wallet on an offline device like a usb.
17) Can I mine on a mac? - Yes look here for more info.
18) Cloud Mining - A service you buy that mines for you. you pay for a certain amount of hashes, lets just say 10gh for an example, and the company/service mines you this amount for the time you bought. It is not profitable usually.
19) What Is a Raspberry Pi? - A small cheap computer that people use to run their miners on.
20) Watts - The measure of electricity.
21) Should I pre-order? No Never F%&$ing pre order, you will get scammed 99.9999% of the time.
22) Can I still mine? - Yes, you probably wont make money but you will support the doge community.
23) Linux - An operating system like windows that people use to run mining programs on.
24) If you Have an animal make sure to properly protect your mining rig from them. Wires from the machines make great chew toys.
25) How Do I calculate if im going to make money with my mining rig? - Use This mining Calculator This is also a very good calculator
26 What Mining Program Should I use? Windows: CG MINER Mac: Astroid Linux: CG Miner again
Goodluck mining I hope this helps. This Also Took A long time to make so support would be appreciated :)
submitted by sircam22 to dogemining [link] [comments]

SLAX Miner 0.2

this is updated version of SLAX miner, old post is here
Features :
How To Install :
How To Run :
Added :
Changes :
bitcointalk thread
SLAX miner 0.2 download (257MB)
Donation : 1GE4dwPifw57JWz9izyXjiMCTe63PmXgth
*** newer version is [here](www.reddit.com/gpumining/comments/1xqrti/cryptoslax_03b_slax_based_linux_mine) ***
submitted by uraymeiviar to BitcoinMining [link] [comments]

LTC to BTC - differences in mining

Hi /BitcoinMining
With LTC mining being reported as less profitable than BTC mining, I changed an older rig (Win 7 x64, cgminer 3.0.1, Catalyst 12.8, 2GB version 6950) over to BTC to see what the differences were. I signed up with the BTC Guild and chose PPLNS because this reward scheme worked well in LTC-land, and in a few minutes the pool was reporting an accurate hashrate for the worker.
cgminer is running with only the pool and worker parameters because I haven't read tuning methodologies for BTC mining. The GPU is currently reporting 354 Mh/s, 99.1% shares accepted, but only a work utility of 4.9/m. BTC Guild reports 379.04 Mh/s and 99.07% shares accepted. The allchains calculator estimates 0.016 BTC/day for 354 Mh/s but the rewards from BTC Guild are only averaging 0.011 BTC/day. Given that BTC Guild is reporting a higher hashrate, this lower reward is unexpected.
My initial questions are:
(1) Is there a recommended tuning guide for BTC mining? This GPU was performing really well with LTC mining and I'd like to make it more efficient for BTC.
(2) What would be causing, or contributing to, the significantly lower reward from BTC Guild?
Cheers.
submitted by ltc_for_me to BitcoinMining [link] [comments]

Repost for a nice not-so-new pool looking for hashrate !

Hello guys. I'm doing a repost of our old thread regarding Hypernova (https://hypernova.pw) : http://www.reddit.com/litecoinmining/comments/1dcvcv/ann_ltceuusrbpps_hypernova_your_brandnew_mining/
It's been quite 1 month since we announced our opening. We and our fellow users thought it might be a good idea to talk about it again since the pool's maturity increased and features added up to the list (like replacing proportional reward system with CPPSRB)
Let me show you the main features !
A nice looking and efficient web interface We'red tired about these copy-paste pools using the mmcFE-litecoin project. We've wanted something beautiful, original and useful. Soak managed to bring you the best web interface he could. Use it on your computer, phone, phablet, android, iphone, ipad, refrigerator, lawn-mower... Starting everything from scratch was our choice - and our pride.
Capped Pay Per Share with Recent Backpay Reward System We didn't find something else longer to spell. You may have already seen this reward system currently live on the Bitcoin mining pool Eligius. To be short : it's a system that tries to be close of the classic PPS reward system. The main difference is : the pool pays the miners with the solved blocks funds. The pool doesn't take risks on short/long rounds. When a round's unlucky and the pool can't pay anymore for the work, we shelve your shares for further backpay. As the formula calculating PPS price is based on a ~60% luck assumption (It is the same formula for every classic PPS pool), mathematically we should end up with more frequent lucky (with no shelves) rounds than unlucky. With that system the pool doesn't take the risk of being bankrupt. So what we have there is a nice compromise between PPLNS with high variance and PPS with null variance (which is balanced by higher fees and a risk of bankruptcy for the pool operators).
Custom difficulty choosable per worker We heard that a bunch of you doesn't like vardiff or fixed diff pools. That's why we let you the choice. Either you're a tiny cpu miner or a cowboy with GPU farms, you're free to choose your worker difficulty from 8 to 128.
Sweet pool efficiency We've worked hard on our infrastructure implementation and Stratum. Our general overall efficiency always have been above 99%. At the time I'm writing these lines it is at 99.47% accepted shares versus 0.53% rejected. We're aware about the latency challenge. That's why we opened 4 nodes around the world to ensure the lowest round trip time : mining.eu.hypernova.pw (Europe, France) mining.usa.hypernova.pw (USA, New York) mining.usa.dallas.hypernova.pw (USA, Dallas) mining.usa.la.hypernova.pw (USA, Los Angeles)
A helpful and nice community We're always happy to help you. By mail on [email protected] or on IRC Freenode's channel #hypernova with the pool operators and our fellow miners. Keep in touch with us, we're nice people always trying to crunch our 7950 to the best !
1% fee Using a nice PPS reward system with a good compromise allows us to lower the fee thus allowing to help us pay for the servers and infrastructure.
API with JSON encoded values So you're the cowboy with a farm of 7950 ? Enjoy our API to monitor your rigs !
How to join us ? Give a shot to the website : https://hypernova.pw and create an account. Once you created a worker, point your miner toward your nearest node and shout us your best battle cry at #hypernova on Freenode ! EG (for cgminer) : cgminer -o stratum+tcp://mining.eu.hypernova.pw:3333 -u JohnDoe.myWorker -p 12345 --scrypt ...
Help us to spread the word ! We've put online a page especially for that : https://hypernova.pw/spread/ with links to every of our threads and useful buttons for Facebook/TwitteGoogle spreading.
Message for those that were with us from the beginning Thank you ! We're happy to see our project moving forward. We wouldn't have been that far without you supporting us. Thank you again and see you in the future.
So far, 2130 Litecoins redistributed to our fellow miners. Still counting... !
Hope to see you soon on Hypernova.. And sorry for the noise :)
submitted by M0nsieurChat to litecoinmining [link] [comments]

[modpost] Possible wiki page, something I call "All about miners," covering things from basic terminology to miner config files and overclocking.

What is a miner?
A miner is a computer set up to solve cryptographic hashes in the litecoin network. Once a clump of these hashes, or a block, is mined, litecoins pop out! It's like opening a box of chocolates, except you know what you're gonna get :) Miners also handle transaction confirmations, making sure no single coin is double-spent.
Setting up your computer to be a miner
What kind of computer do I need?
Optimally, you'd have a good power supply and a couple decent Radeon/ATI/AMD graphics cards. Because of litecoin's hash algorithm, the gap between mining with graphics cards and processors is less than with most other cryptocurrencies, meaning that mining with some desktop processors may be worth it after electricity costs. Note that mining with laptops is not recommended because of the heat generated by mining, and mining with NVIDIA graphics cards may not be worth the cost.
How do I know if litecoin mining will be profitable for me?
First, check how fast you'll be mining with your hardware, how many litecoins you'll mine in a day, and how much litecoins are worth. Now, multiply the number of litecoins per day by their worth. Then, find out the power draw of your hardware, and calculate energy cost. Then finish by subtract energy cost from your daily earnings. If your number is positive, you're making that much money per day. If negative, you're losing money.
Keep in mind that the worth of litecoins goes up/down, and you have to earn the cost of your hardware before you churn a profit. Mining difficulty also goes up/down, depending on how many people are mining how fast in relation to how many litecoins are supposed to be generated how fast. See the economics(coming soon) post for more info.
Okay, I did all that. How do I start?
All you have to do is download a program and change some settings (later in the guide), and you're ready to go. If you're comfortable with configurations and the command line, Reaper and cgminer are your best friends. Otherwise, GUIMiner-scrypt is right for you. If you want to mine on your processor, download the "batteries included" miner via this link and setup should be relatively self-explanatory.
Do I mine alone?
Due to the difficulty of mining, we recommend that you mine with a pool where multiple people mine together. Visit your pool's about or help page for proper miner settings, which we're about to get to in-depth!
Under the hood
Configuring your miner (aka the hard part)
Before we get started, you should become familiar with these terms:
None of those will have any affect on how fast you mine. The settings that we'll be focusing on are:
If you're using GUIMiner-scrypt, there are default settings for different cards (lower right dropdown). I'm mining on a 7870. Here is what it looks like for me. You can follow along with the rest of this guide to optimize your settings. GUIMiner-scrypt is just a GUI to cgminer and reaper anyways.
If you are using a command-line miner, like reaper and cgminer, I recommend you download and isntall Notepad++ or SublimeText if on Linux.
Reaper is currently considered to be the best tool for mining. After you unzip your downloaded file, in the folder you'll find reaper.conf. It should look something like this:
kernel reaper.cl save_binaries yes enable_graceful_shutdown no long_polling yes platform 0 device 0 #mine bitcoin mine litecoin #mine solidcoin 
This will make it mine litecoin on your first graphics card and reference litecoin.conf, which for me looks like
host us-pool.give-me-ltc.com port 8080 user poolusername.1 pass anything protocol litecoin worksize 256 vectors 1 aggression 18 threads_per_gpu 1 sharethreads 32 lookup_gap 2 gpu_thread_concurrency 15380 
As you see, my thread concurrency is slightly different from the default of GUIMiner-scrypt. I found that this concurrency gives me the best hashrate!
NOTE: I do not use cgminer to mine litecoin. If you plan on using cgminer, which offers more hardware-controlling settings, in the cgminer folder you will want to create a text file. Then, open that text file w/ Notepad++ or SublimeText, then Save As > cgminer.con > file type > all. This will save the file with the proper name and as the proper type. Note that cgminer does not support high concurrencies. For me, cgminer.conf would look something like:
{ "pools" : [ { "url" : "XXX", "user" : "XXX", "pass" : "XXX" } ], "auto-fan" : true, "gpu-engine" : "920", "gpu-fan" : "0-100", "gpu-memclock" : "1375", "gpu-powertune" : "20", "gpu-vddc" : "1.219", "temp-cutoff" : "85", "temp-overheat" : "80", "temp-target" : "75", "temp-hysteresis" : "3", "kernel" : "scrypt", "gputhreads" : "1", "thread_concurrency": "8192", "worksize": "256", "intensity" : "dynamic", "vectors" : "1" } 
You saw some settings similar to what we saw in Reaper's litecoin.conf. The other settings have to do with my card's clocks, voltage, and fan. This is covered in the overclocking section right below!
Overclocking (aka the risky part)
Okay, first off I'm not responsible if you cause damage to your parts. Please research safe overclock settings for your card. Second, don't be afraid. Modern hardware has many safety features in place that help prevent mayhem like me...lol jk this isn't a car insurance add. For your better understanding, become familiar with these terms:
No one setting controls how effectively you mine; what matters most when it comes to clocks is the ratio between your core/memory clocks. Generally, a ratio of 0.7 or below is best. You will need to experiment. If you're using cgminer, you can control card settings from the conf file. However, if you aren't, I recommend using MSI Afterburner as your overclocking tool. You will need to unlock some settings. Using my cgminer settings, MSI Afterburner looks like this. I have found these settings to be the most stable while bringing me a high hashrate.
Other people's optimum settings
You can check the sidebar for the hardware comparison chart, but it is rarely updated and has huge sways in results. It is a good starting place. The mods of this subreddit will be putting together an updated, more accurate list in the near future.
END
I hope all things go smoothly for you and that you've learned a lot! Please consider donating LTC to
My wallet: LiD41gjLjT5JL2hfVz8X4SRm27T3wQqzjk
The writer of the [Consolidated Litecoin Mining Guide] which helped get me started
The writer of the [Absolute Beginner's Litecoin Mining Guide] which also helped me get started
submitted by mycomputerisbacon to litecoinmining [link] [comments]

[IDEA] CGMiner Best Settings System

ISSUE
CGMiner GPU settings are not intuitive to properly allow a user to get the best hash out of their particular card. Each individual GPU has a 'best setting' that often does not perfectly translate to another card of the same model. There is a huge demand for assistance in determining the best settings for each card.
DISCUSSION
I think there's enough evidence to suggest that simply maxing out a GPU's overclock settings is not necessarily the best way to get the highest performance.
Graham Forest discovered this a few years ago and built a very good histogram of the results. He wrote a simple program to test a huge range of possibilities and find the area of best results. His program cgminer2rrd includes much of the capability required
The cgminer 3.7.2 SCRYPT-README notes this. Spinx on the bitcoin forum also makes a note of this ratio.
In my own case, I found several ratios between gpu-engine and gpu-memclock that resulted in best performance. Here's a data table I made. Altering this ratio by even a small amount drastically affected hash rate.
I found the same thing with intensity. -I 14 resulted in significantly lower performance than -I 13.
RECOMMENDATION
I propose a software solution that will test a range of value combinations and create a visual representation of the results.
Record/Display test values
Test a range of GPU/Memory value ratios
Test a range of Intensity settings
Test Duration
NOTES I'm just a guy who noticed a problem and found a good starting place for a solution. I'm not a programmer, but am experienced in working with developers to create software solutions.
TL;DR Make a program that will auto test a range of cgminer configurations.
submitted by JCollierDavis to dogecoindev [link] [comments]

A Bitcoin Miracle (Story)

Ian had started mining bitcoins with all his friends in high school, as a hobby. He had researched the concept and realized it would be a fun thing to get involved in. His interest in it had been perked by his econ professor, when they discussed the pro's and con's of different types of currencies / payment methods in history. With his after school job stocking shelves he had saved up a bit of money and all he had to do was convince his parents the extra electricity him and his friends would be using of theirs, with the computers running in the basement. To save on costs, he wanted to keep the computers as cool as possible, using as much "passive" cooling as he could get away with. At dinner he spoke to his father, Ted, who like most parents, not only didn't understand what he was talking about, but claimed it was illegal on some level. "You can't just make money from thin air! The answer is no". Begrudgingly Ian went to his room and logged on to his and his friends favorite IRC server to let them know of the answer. Luckily Ian's bestfriend, Sara, had gotten the go ahead from her parents, who were thrilled she was interested in computers. They knew that any employment opportunities in the future their daughter would chase, would involve a strong grasp of current computing technologies. Unlike Ian's dad, Sara's parents had asked her how Bitcoin mining worked, and after she had explained it, her parents realized their daughter and friends weren't going to be actually printing money from thin air, but employing hardware and software to work for it. And electricity. They all agreed to meet tomorrow to plan it.
They met at lunch, outside, and sketched out the amount of money they'd need to spend in the start, as well as a monthly amount of cash they'd give to Sara to offset the cost of the electricity. They all were pretty amped about it, other then Ian. Ian returned home and decided that he'd do some mining on his own, regardless of what his father had said. He'd just sacrifice his own rooms electric power, so his father wouldn't ever notice it. This meant no more Xbox, no more air conditioning, and no more mini fridge. He built a small space in his closet, that had a hole for an air duct into the attic. With proper airflow achieved he began the process of transferring all his files from his desktop to his netbook. He had enough money for more graphics cards, but not an entire separate machine. He maxed out his computer with 4 HD 5830's after some research on cost/MHash, installed Ubuntu on the computer, started up cgminer on it, and configured the machine to mine with a few pools. He had them send bitcoins to a wallet he had made, in a truecrypt volume. Feeling pretty excited about it, he turned off his AC, and tried to fall asleep in the summer night.
Weeks and months and then a few years passed by, with some of Ian's time being spent at Sara's basement with the rest of the group, building their mining rigs, powering them on, configuring their mining pool, and making sure everything was running properly. One of Ian's friends dad was an engineer, and they had been able to borrow an infrared thermometer gun to double check the temperatures of the cards. Things were going real well. And when things are going well, something bad is bound to happen.
Ian began feeling more and more tired each morning. At first he thought it was because he was sleeping without the AC on, so he tried sleeping on the couch in the living room. Things only continued to get worst. Ian's mother took him to a doctor that accepted their health insurance, and after waiting a few weeks for blood tests, it turned out Ian had to have an MRI to verify a few things. The doctors soon saw the cause of his problems, which was a brain tumor that was causing elevated pressure in his head. Ian and his family went home to discuss what they would do, and how they'd pay for it.
While Ian's parents figured out a way to pay for surgery, they heard a crash come from the staircase. Ian had feinted on his way up to his room. As they carried him to the car all they heard him mutter was "bitcoins". Figuring it was due to him feinting they rushed him to the emergency room at the local hospital, where Ian was put in to a chemically induced coma, to prevent any brain damage.
Ian's friends came to visit him, but they visited less and less each week. One day, with only Ian's parents and Sara in the hospital room, the father mentioned to Sara the last thing Ian had said to him was something about bitcoin's, and he then told her about the fight he had had with Ian the year before. She smiled and told him about how they had ended up doing it at her basement, explaining what it was, and how most of their coins they had spent on pizza. She told him that the price of a bitcoin was rising, in U.S. dollars. The father smiled, realizing that his son may have been right all along, about the importance of a decentralized currency, and after Sara's explanation, it truly wasn't printing money from thin air. There was nothing illegal about it. A $20 dollar bill wasn't illegal because it could be used to buy drugs, so why should a bitcoin be illegal?
Later that night, Ian's father was going over the family bills that seemed to keep stacking up, trying to figure out how to pay for Ian's surgery, when he saw the electric bill was much higher then usual. He had recently turned the AC on in Ian's room, and plugged his mini-fridge in after stocking it with his favorite soda's, in anticipation of the day his son would come home. He went up to Ian's room and heard a whirring noise coming from Ian's closet. Behind a stack of comic books and shoe boxes he found Ian's desktop. "What was it doing back here?" He decided to give Sara a call, though it was late, she lived across the street so it wouldn't be a problem. He showed her what he had found, and after some clicking and typing, she hugged him and screamed for joy. Confused he asked her what was she so happy about. She showed him Ian's Bitcoin wallet, which was still mounted, and explained that Ian had been mining privately Bitcoins for awhile now. His Bitcoin wallet showed 1803.78004 BTC. Before Ian's father could ask why this was good news, Sara showed him the current rate of a bitcoin on mtgox, and after some calculations, Ian's father realized enough money existed to pay for Ian's surgery!
Sara spent the rest of the night setting up accounts on various BTC exchanges, transferring funds, and then trading bitcoins for U.S. dollars. The next day was spent going from bank to bank, to pick up wire transfers, and then it was time for Ian's surgery.
When Ian recovered from the surgery, Sara explained to him what had happened, while Ian's father and mother held his hands. Ian's dad apologized and told him he'd support his bitcoin hobby. Sara interjected and caught Ian up on how GPU mining was soon being replaced with ASIC mining. Ian looked up at his father and casually mentioned "Well... my birthday is coming up..."
|Just something that came to me on my bus ride this morning
submitted by qwertytard to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Mining LiteCoin with GPU use cgminer-LTC Home Gpu mining update 2019 tutorial Bitcoin mining with CGMiner tutorial: Bitcoin mining with CGMiner Cgminer Scrypt Mining Tuning (Overclocking) GPU Raise Hashrate Tutorial (Litecoin, Feathercoin, etc)

The Bitcoin price is rising at a slightly lesser 0.3403% per day over the past year. We suggest you enter a custom Bitcoin price into our calculator based on what you expect the average price to be over the next year. The price has gone down for most of the past year, which is a factor that should be strongly considered in your calculations. Bitcoin Mining calculator software displays statistics like the hash rate, Cryptocurrency mining technology uses the processing power of the computer’s graphics processing unit (GPU) to help in locating blocks. It supports minerd, ASIC,cudaminer,cgminer,ccminer mining for Bitcoin. To conclude, a Bitcoin mining calculator can give you a much better idea about your potential to run a profitable mining operation. Remember, however, that some factors such as Bitcoin’s price and mining difficulty, change every day and can have dramatic effects on profitability, so it’s important to conduct up to date calculations when needed. Either you need a GPU or an ASIC to set up a mining rig. CGMiner: This bitcoin mining software has been there in the market for a while and is one of the best bitcoin mining software. The software comes with an array of features along with active community support. When it is about bitcoin mining calculator, there are a lot of factors Profitability Calculator Check the potential earnings of your hardware. Calculator Comparison Currency 🇺🇸 USD - $ GPU. EARNINGS/DAY. AMD Radeon VII. 0.00021600 BTC $2.00. NVIDIA RTX 2080 Ti. 0.00019300 BTC $1.79. NVIDIA TITAN RTX . 0.00019100 BTC $1.77. NVIDIA TITAN V.

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Mining LiteCoin with GPU use cgminer-LTC

Cgminer is bitcoin mining software that's easy to setup.This mining tutorial will demonstrate how to configure cgminer on windows. #cgminer #cgminertutorial #mining #cryptomining. Please subscribe to my channel. Thank you so much. Đăng ký kênh ủng hộ mình nhé. Mining LiteCoin with GPU use cgminer. Setup tool and worker: https://www.you... bitcoin mining calculator bitcoin farm bitcoins mining bitcoin machine scrypt miner bitmine bitcoin mining computer scrypt mining best bitcoin miner gpu mining bitcoin mining rig bitcoin mining ... tutorial- Bitcoin mining with CGMiner. BFGMiner on Windows Setup Guide for Bitcoin Users + ASIC Miner Setup Bitcoin Weekly Show - Duration: 6:54. cxboy 83,113 views What It Was Like MINING Cryptocurrency Full-Time For A Year Tails Health Update VoskCoin Rebrand - Duration: 23:44. VoskCoin 339,899 views

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