Bitcoin Wiki

Best General RenVM Questions of February 2020

Best General RenVM Questions of January 2020

\These questions are sourced directly from Telegram*
Q: Are all the projects listed in the Ren Alliance, the final set of members?
A: No, please do keep in mind this just our first round of partners, some larger orgs require a bit more DD (i.e our audit). We’ll release the final set of members when Mainnet goes live.

Q: How do projects join the Ren Alliance?
A: It’s simple, just fill out this application. It takes about five minutes, and all you need is your company’s logo files and your preferred area(s) of involvement. Joining the Alliance requires no binding commitments, only a desire to help bring cross-chain assets to DeFi.

Q: For example let's say there is a crypto index which contains 1 BTC and 1 ZEC. I have 1 BTC and 1 ZEC and I would like to “mint” this index token with RenVM. Will something like this possible in the future?
A: This is already possible today. RenVM allows you to mint renBTC and renZEC (and renBCH) on Ethereum. This result is an ERC20 like any other with the addition that when you burn it, you get real BTC and ZEC back.
Another nice feature is that you can directly call smart contracts when minting. This is not possible in any other system, and results in a very clean and simple user experience. People can make a BTC transaction followed by a ZEC transaction and with no other blockchain actions end up with their BTC and ZEC in your example system (your example system would have functions for accepting BTC and ZEC and when receiving both, it would output some kind of index token; exactly how it functions is up to how you want to implement your contract!)

Q: What blockchains does RenVM support?
A: RenVM can support any ECDSA based blockchain but we'll be starting with BTC, ZEC, and BCH. More info here: https://github.com/renproject/ren/wiki/Supported-Blockchains

Q: Another concern is chain rollback. In the case of MakerDAO getting hacked (unlikely, but not impossible), the Ethereum network could rollback just like with the DAO. (Unlikely, but not impossible). But what if the attacker already has deposited the hacked funds into RenVM and gotten a private coin?
A: A roll-back would still revert that state. Privacy on-chain != no state tracking something (just in a way that doesn’t reveal information). So reverts don’t really matter in that sense. They do matter in a broader sense: you have renBTC and you burn it for BTC, then Ethereum rolls back to when you had renBTC still. This is something the Ethereum community has to consider very carefully these days if they were to ever do such a revert. This is an ultimately unavoidable truth RE interoperability; you are compounding risks of the chains you are using. In general, this is why it’s always safer to keep your BTC on Bitcoin unless there is a specific reason you need it on Ethereum at any given point in time.

Q: If BTC can be transferred with zero confirmation how many transactions RenVM can handle?
A: RenVMs throughput isn’t affected by conf-less transactions. This is a service provided by L2 technology (like the 0Conf team, who are building exactly this!). This doesn’t affect RenVM directly, but it does have the pleasant impact that users won’t notice network congestion if it happens.

Q: Can you explain the over-collateralization security dynamic between tBTC and RenVM? Does this play into Maker using RenVM vs. tBTC to collaetize their CDP’s
A1: It’s not the over collateralization that’s the problem. It’s that to get $X BTC they need 1.5x $X ETH locked up in their protocol. What about other places that give better ETH returns? What about the fact that ETH doesn’t go up in price just because tBTC is used?
With REN, we are actually over collateralized (so they’re wrong that they are more secure in this regard). The big difference: BTC flowing through REN increases the value of the REN collateral, increasing the security, increasing the capacity of BTC that can flow through the system. It’s a positive feedback loop for capacity and security that simply doesn’t exist if you don’t use an isolated token.
A2: Maker wants to use BTC to collateralise Dai, because it diversifies risk and expands the possible Dai supply (by expanding possible collateral). If you use tBTC, then tBTC is collateralised by ETH so you actually become less efficient at minting Dai, and you don’t diversify risk because tBTC gets liquidated by ETH price movements.
You don’t want your network secured by collateral that has speculative value that is not correlated with the usage of the network. That makes things unstable.
If RenVM is being used, the value of REN increases, and the more RenVM can be used (and Darknodes get the positive upside of their bond increasing in value). This means by pumping lots of BTC into RenVM, you gain more capacity to pump more BTC into RenVM. This creates a positive feedback loop for the returns earned by Darknodes, the value of their bond, and overall/capacity security of the network.
Compare to tBTC: you are waiting for ETH to go up in value. It’s value, which does not correlate with the amount of BTC in the system, limits the AUM that the system can hold. You’re hoping it will go up independently of the usage of your network and if it doesn’t you’re out of luck. Network growth does not drive the ability for the network to grow. Your are also competing with the returns on ETH that other ecosystems allow you to get (why bond ETH in tBTC if you can get better returns on that ETH in other places; lending it or staking it in Eth2.0). (Btw: we’re doing research to get our collateralisation of REN to 150%. It’s already possible, and could be done today, but we are just seeing if we can make it safelivelier than the current best-in-class algorithms.)

Q: How do we define the value of L and R if we don't use oracle price feed?
A: It will be decided by the Darknodes. The best mechanism of doing this is still being decided upon. However, it won’t simply be taken from the current market price / third-party oracles as those are vulnerable to manipulation. Ultimately, the only valuation that matters is the Darknodes (because they’re the ones being potentially bribed).

Q: In my opinion, RenVM (and tBTC adoption bottleneck: 300% collateral ratio» this ratio is important for security and decentralization» to sustain this ratio we need significant fees to be imposed on Renbtc holders» example: if there was 100m$ Renbtc total supply then we need 300m$ ren locked in darknodes» if 3-5% fees paid for those 300m$ then we need to extract 9-15 million fees from the 100m renbtc» that equal 9-15% annual fees» of course it will be lower with the minting and burning fees but I don't think it will cover half of the total needed fees» the result with the current design there are still too much economic friction IMO.
A: The key thing to keep in mind is velocity. Not just TVL. Let’s take Kyber as an example: they have $4.9M AUM. But, they did $3.7M in trades in the last 24 hours. Over the year, that’s 275x their AUM.
So, if RenVM is holding $100M AUM, and achieves a volume multiplier of 200x then it gets $1M p/a in holding fees but $40M in minting/burning fees. This is all assuming the minimum fee as well (it rises as TVL approaches the limit). So RenVM would need a $300M market cap on $41M in revenue. That’s 13% p/a, assuming we don’t make the move to only 150% collateral. If we do move to that, then it’s almost 33% p/a.
RenVM is by far and away the best UX for instantly swapping BTC on DEXs (with no gas, and no confirmations). All of the interfaces we’re building and the tools we’re providing give people that native experience. This is precisely because high TVL is not what yields good returns and increases cap for the protocol.
Even systems like MakerDAO/Compound have people moving BTC in/out. Their AUM is by no means static. People are constantly opening/closing/liquidating positions and all of this is would create velocity through RenVM.

Q: How was ETHDenver?
A: ETHDenver was great, and very productive, confirmed a lot of our thoughts on what needs to be done but also gave us a good amount of exposure, so overall it was a positive for the team and RenVM.
submitted by RENProtocol to RenProject [link] [comments]

Best General RenVM Questions of January 2020

Best General RenVM Questions of January 2020

‌*These questions are sourced directly from Telegram
Q: When you say RenVM is Trustless, Permissionless, and Decentralized, what does that actually mean?
A: Trustless = RenVM is a virtual machine (a network of nodes, that do computations), this means if you ask RenVM to trade an asset via smart contract logic, it will. No trusted intermediary that holds assets or that you need to rely on. Because RenVM is a decentralized network and computes verified information in a secure environment, no single party can prevent users from sending funds in, withdrawing deposited funds, or computing information needed for updating outside ledgers. RenVM is an agnostic and autonomous virtual broker that holds your digital assets as they move between blockchains.
Permissionless = RenVM is an open protocol; meaning anyone can use RenVM and any project can build with RenVM. You don't need anyone's permission, just plug RenVM into your dApp and you have interoperability.
Decentralized = The nodes that power RenVM ( Darknodes) are scattered throughout the world. RenVM has a peak capacity of up to 10,000 Darknodes (due to REN’s token economics). Realistically, there will probably be 100 - 500 Darknodes run in the initial Mainnet phases, ample decentralized nonetheless.

Q: Okay, so how can you prove this?
A: The publication of our audit results will help prove the trustlessness piece; permissionless and decentralized can be proven today.
Permissionless = https://github.com/renproject/ren-js
Decentralized = https://chaosnet.renproject.io/

Q: How does Ren sMPC work? Sharmir's secret sharing? TSS?
A: There is some confusion here that keeps arising so I will do my best to clarify.TL;DR: *SSS is just data. It’s what you do with the data that matters. RenVM uses sMPC on SSS to create TSS for ECDSA keys.*SSS and TSS aren’t fundamental different things. It’s kind of like asking: do you use numbers, or equations? Equations often (but not always) use numbers or at some point involve numbers.
SSS by itself is just a way of representing secret data (like numbers). sMPC is how to generate and work with that data (like equations). One of the things you can do with that work is produce a form of TSS (this is what RenVM does).
However, TSS is slightly different because it can also be done *without* SSS and sMPC. For example, BLS signatures don’t use SSS or sMPC but they are still a form of TSS.
So, we say that RenVM uses SSS+sMPC because this is more specific than just saying TSS (and you can also do more with SSS+sMPC than just TSS). Specifically, all viable forms of turning ECDSA (a scheme that isn’t naturally threshold based) into a TSS needs SSS+sMPC.
People often get confused about RenVM and claim “SSS can’t be used to sign transactions without making the private key whole again”. That’s a strange statement and shows a fundamental misunderstanding about what SSS is.
To come back to our analogy, it’s like saying “numbers can’t be used to write a book”. That’s kind of true in a direct sense, but there are plenty of ways to encode a book as numbers and then it’s up to how you interpret (how you *use*) those numbers. This is exactly how this text I’m writing is appearing on your screen right now.
SSS is just secret data. It doesn’t make sense to say that SSS *functions*. RenVM is what does the functioning. RenVM *uses* the SSSs to represent private keys. But these are generated and used and destroyed as part of sMPC. The keys are never whole at any point.

Q: Thanks for the explanation. Based on my understanding of SSS, a trusted dealer does need to briefly put the key together. Is this not the case?
A: Remember, SSS is just the representation of a secret. How you get from the secret to its representation is something else. There are many ways to do it. The simplest way is to have a “dealer” that knows the secret and gives out the shares. But, there are other ways. For example: we all act as dealers, and all give each other shares of our individual secret. If there are N of us, we now each have N shares (one from every person). Then we all individually add up the shares that we have. We now each have a share of a “global” secret that no one actually knows. We know this global secret is the sum of everyone’s individual secrets, but unless you know every individual’s secret you cannot know the global secret (even though you have all just collectively generates shares for it). This is an example of an sMPC generation of a random number with collusion resistance against all-but-one adversaries.

Q: If you borrow Ren, you can profit from the opposite Ren gain. That means you could profit from breaking the network and from falling Ren price (because breaking the network, would cause Ren price to drop) (lower amount to be repaid, when the bond gets slashed)
A: Yes, this is why it’s important there has a large number of Darknodes before moving to full decentralisation (large borrowing becomes harder). We’re exploring a few other options too, that should help prevent these kinds of issues.

Q: What are RenVM’s Security and Liveliness parameters?
A: These are discussed in detail in our Wiki, please check it out here: https://github.com/renproject/ren/wiki/Safety-and-Liveliness#analysis

Q: What are the next blockchain under consideration for RenVM?
A: These can be found here: https://github.com/renproject/ren/wiki/Supported-Blockchains

Q: I've just read that Aztec is going to be live this month and currently tests txs with third parties. Are you going to participate in early access or you just more focused on bringing Ren to Subzero stage?
A: At this stage, our entire focus is on Mainnet SubZero. But, we will definitely be following up on integrating with AZTEC once everything is out and stable.

Q: So how does RenVM compare to tBTC, Thorchain, WBTC, etc..?
A: An easy way to think about it is..RenVM’s functionality is a combination of tBTC (+ WBTC by extension), and Thorchain’s (proposed) capabilities... All wrapped into one. Just depends on what the end-user application wants to do with it.

Q1: What are the core technical/security differences between RenVM and tBTC?A1: The algorithm used by tBTC faults if even one node goes offline at the wrong moment (and the whole “keep” of nodes can be penalised for this). RenVM can survive 1/3rd going offline at any point at any time. Advantage for tBTC is that collusion is harder, disadvantage is obviously availability and permissionlessness is lower.
tBTC an only mint/burn lots of 1 BTC and requires an on-Ethereum SPV relay for Bitcoin headers (and for any other chain it adds). No real advantage trade-off IMO.
tBTC has a liquidation mechanism that means nodes can have their bond liquidated because of ETH/BTC price ratio. Advantage means users can get 1 BTC worth of ETH. Disadvantage is it means tBTC is kind of a synthetic: needs a price feed, needs liquid markets for liquidation, users must accept exposure to ETH even if they only hold tBTC, nodes must stay collateralized or lose lots of ETH. RenVM doesn’t have this, and instead uses fees to prevent becoming under-collateralized. This requires a mature market, and assumed Darknodes will value their REN bonds fairly (based on revenue, not necessarily what they can sell it for at current —potentially manipulated—market value). That can be an advantage or disadvantage depending on how you feel.
tBTC focuses more on the idea of a tokenized version of BTC that feels like an ERC20 to the user (and is). RenVM focuses more on letting the user interact with DeFi and use real BTC and real Bitcoin transactions to do so (still an ERC20 under the hood, but the UX is more fluid and integrated). Advantage of tBTC is that it’s probably easier to understand and that might mean better overall experience, disadvantage really comes back to that 1 BTC limit and the need for a more clunky minting/burning experience that might mean worse overall experience. Too early to tell, different projects taking different bets.
tBTC supports BTC (I think they have ZEC these days too). RenVM supports BTC, BCH, and ZEC (docs discuss Matic, XRP, and LTC).
Q2: This are my assumed differences between tBTC and RenVM, are they correct? Some key comparisons:
-Both are vulnerable to oracle attacks
-REN federation failure results in loss or theft of all funds
-tBTC failures tend to result in frothy markets, but holders of tBTC are made whole
-REN quorum rotation is new crypto, and relies on honest deletion of old key shares
-tBTC rotates micro-quorums regularly without relying on honest deletion
-tBTC relies on an SPV relay
-REN relies on federation honesty to fill the relay's purpose
-Both are brittle to deep reorgs, so expanding to weaker chains like ZEC is not clearly a good idea
-REN may see total system failure as the result of a deep reorg, as it changes federation incentives significantly
-tBTC may accidentally punish some honest micro-federations as the result of a deep reorg
-REN generally has much more interaction between incentive models, as everything is mixed into the same pot.
-tBTC is a large collection of small incentive models, while REN is a single complex incentive model
A2: To correct some points:
The oracle situation is different with RenVM, because the fee model is what determines the value of REN with respect to the cross-chain asset. This is the asset is what is used to pay the fee, so no external pricing is needed for it (because you only care about the ratio between REN and the cross-chain asset).
RenVM does rotate quorums regularly, in fact more regularly than in tBTC (although there are micro-quorums, each deposit doesn’t get rotated as far as I know and sticks around for up to 6 months). This rotation involves rotations of the keys too, so it does not rely on honest deletion of key shares.
Federated views of blockchains are easier to expand to support deep re-orgs (just get the nodes to wait for more blocks for that chain). SPV requires longer proofs which begins to scale more poorly.
Not sure what you mean by “one big pot”, but there are multiple quorums so the failure of one is isolated from the failures of others. For example, if there are 10 shards supporting BTC and one of them fails, then this is equivalent to a sudden 10% fee being applied. Harsh, yes, but not total failure of the whole system (and doesn’t affect other assets).
Would be interesting what RenVM would look like with lots more shards that are smaller. Failure becomes much more isolated and affects the overall network less.
Further, the amount of tBTC you can mint is dependent on people who are long ETH and prefer locking it up in Keep for earning a smallish fee instead of putting it in Compound or leveraging with dydx. tBTC is competing for liquidity while RenVM isn't.

Q: I understand correctly RenVM (sMPC) can get up to a 50% security threshold, can you tell me more?
A: The best you can theoretically do with sMPC is 50-67% of the total value of REN used to bond Darknodes (RenVM will eventually work up to 50% and won’t go for 67% because we care about liveliness just as much as safety). As an example, if there’s $1M of REN currently locked up in bonded Darknodes you could have up to $500K of tokens shifted through RenVM at any one specific moment. You could do more than that in daily volume, but at any one moment this is the limit.Beyond this limit, you can still remain secure but you cannot assume that players are going to be acting to maximize their profit. Under this limit, a colluding group of adversaries has no incentive to subvert safety/liveliness properties because the cost to attack roughly outweighs the gain. Beyond this limit, you need to assume that players are behaving out of commitment to the network (not necessarily a bad assumption, but definitely weaker than the maximizing profits assumption).

Q: Why is using ETH as collateral for RenVM a bad idea?
A: Using ETH as collateral in this kind of system (like having to deposit say 20 ETH for a bond) would not make any sense because the collateral value would then fluctuate independently of what kind of value RenVM is providing. The REN token on the other hand directly correlates with the usage of RenVM which makes bonding with REN much more appropriate. DAI as a bond would not work as well because then you can't limit attackers with enough funds to launch as many darknodes as they want until they can attack the network. REN is limited in supply and therefore makes it harder to get enough of it without the price shooting up (making it much more expensive to attack as they would lose their bonds as well).
A major advantage of Ren's specific usage of sMPC is that security can be regulated economically. All value (that's being interopped at least) passing through RenVM has explicit value. The network can self-regulate to ensure an attack is never worth it.

Q: Given the fee model proposal/ceiling, might be a liquidity issue with renBTC. More demand than possible supply?A: I don’t think so. As renBTC is minted, the fees being earned by Darknodes go up, and therefore the value of REN goes up. Imagine that the demand is so great that the amount of renBTC is pushing close to 100% of the limit. This is a very loud and clear message to the Darknodes that they’re going to be earning good fees and that demand is high. Almost by definition, this means REN is worth more.
Profits of the Darknodes, and therefore security of the network, is based solely on the use of the network (this is what you want because your network does not make or break on things outside the systems control). In a system like tBTC there are liquidity issues because you need to convince ETH holders to bond ETH and this is an external problem. Maybe ETH is pumping irrespective of tBTC use and people begin leaving tBTC to sell their ETH. Or, that ETH is dumping, and so tBTC nodes are either liquidated or all their profits are eaten by the fact that they have to be long on ETH (and tBTC holders cannot get their BTC back in this case). Feels real bad man.

Q: I’m still wondering which asset people will choose: tbtc or renBTC? I’m assuming the fact that all tbtc is backed by eth + btc might make some people more comfortable with it.
A: Maybe :) personally I’d rather know that my renBTC can always be turned back into BTC, and that my transactions will always go through. I also think there are many BTC holders that would rather not have to “believe in ETH” as an externality just to maximize use of their BTC.

Q: How does the liquidation mechanism work? Can any party, including non-nodes act as liquidators? There needs to be a price feed for liquidation and to determine the minting fee - where does this price feed come from?
A: RenVM does not have a liquidation mechanism.
Q: I don’t understand how the price feeds for minting fees make sense. You are saying that the inputs for the fee curve depend on the amount of fees derived by the system. This is circular in a sense?
A: By evaluating the REN based on the income you can get from bonding it and working. The only thing that drives REN value is the fact that REN can be bonded to allow work to be done to earn revenue. So any price feed (however you define it) is eventually rooted in the fees earned.

Q: Who’s doing RenVM’s Security Audit?
A: ChainSecurity | https://chainsecurity.com/

Q: Can you explain RenVM’s proposed fee model?
A: The proposed fee model can be found here: https://github.com/renproject/ren/wiki/Safety-and-Liveliness#fees

Q: Can you explain in more detail the difference between "execution" and "powering P2P Network". I think that these functions are somehow overlapping? Can you define in more detail what is "execution" and "powering P2P Network"? You also said that at later stages semi-core might still exist "as a secondary signature on everything (this can mathematically only increase security, because the fully decentralised signature is still needed)". What power will this secondary signature have?
A: By execution we specifically mean signing things with the secret ECDSA keys. The P2P network is how every node communicates with every other node. The semi-core doesn’t have any “special powers”. If it stays, it would literally just be a second signature required (as opposed to the one signature required right now).
This cannot affect safety, because the first signature is still required. Any attack you wanted to do would still have to succeed against the “normal” part of the network. This can affect liveliness, because the semi-core could decide not to sign. However, the semi-core follows the same rules as normal shards. The signature is tolerant to 1/3rd for both safety/liveliness. So, 1/3rd+ would have to decide to not sign.
Members of the semi-core would be there under governance from the rest of our ecosystem. The idea is that members would be chosen for their external value. We’ve discussed in-depth the idea of L<3. But, if RenVM is used in MakerDAO, Compound, dYdX, Kyber, etc. it would be desirable to capture the value of these ecosystems too, not just the value of REN bonded. The semi-core as a second signature is a way to do this.
Imagine if the members for those projects, because those projects want to help secure renBTC, because it’s used in their ecosystems. There is a very strong incentive for them to behave honestly. To attack RenVM you first have to attack the Darknodes “as per usual” (the current design), and then somehow convince 1/3rd of these projects to act dishonestly and collapse their own ecosystems and their own reputations. This is a very difficult thing to do.
Worth reminding: the draft for this proposal isn’t finished. It would be great for everyone to give us their thoughts on GitHub when it is proposed, so we can keep a persistent record.

Q: Which method or equation is used to calculate REN value based on fees? I'm interested in how REN value is calculated as well, to maintain the L < 3 ratio?
A: We haven’t finalized this yet. But, at this stage, the plan is to have a smart contract that is controlled by the Darknodes. We want to wait to see how SubZero and Zero go before committing to a specific formulation, as this will give us a chance to bootstrap the network and field inputs from the Darknodes owners after the earnings they can make have become more apparent.
submitted by RENProtocol to RenProject [link] [comments]

Bitcoin’s Security and Hash Rate Explained

Bitcoin’s Security and Hash Rate Explained
As the Bitcoin hash rate reaches new all-time highs, there’s never been a better time to discuss blockchain security and its relation to the hashing power and the Proof of Work (PoW) that feed the network. The Bitcoin system is based on a form of decentralized trust, heavily relying on cryptography. This makes its blockchain highly secure and able to be used for financial transactions and other operations requiring a trustless ledger.
Far from popular belief, cryptography dates back to thousands of years ago. The same root of the word encryption — crypt — comes from the Greek word ‘kryptos’, meaning hidden or secret. Indeed, humans have always wanted to keep some information private. The Assyrians, the Chinese, the Romans, and the Greeks, they all tried over the centuries to conceal some information like trade deals or manufacturing secrets by using symbols or ciphers carved in stone or leather. In 1900 BC, Egyptians used hieroglyphics and experts often refer to them as the first example of cryptography.
Back to our days, Bitcoin uses cryptographic technologies such as:
  1. Cryptographic hash functions (i.e. SHA-256 and RIPEMD-160)
  2. Public Key Cryptography (i.e. ECDSA — the Elliptic Curve Digital Signature Algorithm)
While Public Key Cryptography, bitcoin addresses, and digital signatures are used to provide ownership of bitcoins, the SHA-256 hash function is used to verify data and block integrity and to establish the chronological order of the blockchain. A cryptographic hash function is a mathematical function that verifies the integrity of data by transforming it into a unique unidentifiable code.
Here is a graphic example to make things more clear:

– Extract from the MOOC (Massive Open Online Course) in Digital Currencies at the University of Nicosia.
Furthermore, hash functions are used as part of the PoW algorithm, which is a prominent part of the Bitcoin mining algorithm and this is what is of more interest to understand the security of the network. Mining creates new bitcoins in each block, almost like a central bank printing new money and creates trust by ensuring that transactions are confirmed only when enough computational power is devoted to the block that contains them. More blocks mean more computation, which means more trust.
With PoW, miners compete against each other to complete transactions on the network and get rewarded. Basically they need to solve a complicated mathematical puzzle and a possibility to easily prove the solution. The more hashing power, the higher the chance to resolve the puzzle and therefore perform the proof of work. In more simple words, bitcoins exist thanks to a peer to peer network that helps validate transactions in the ledger and provides enough trust to avoid that a third party is involved in the process. It also exists because miners give it life by resolving that computational puzzle, through the mining reward incentive they are receiving.
For more info, contact Block.co directly or email at [email protected].
Tel +357 70007828
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submitted by BlockDotCo to u/BlockDotCo [link] [comments]

Subreddit Stats: Bitcoin posts from 2018-10-09 to 2018-10-16 19:41 PDT

Period: 7.10 days
Submissions Comments
Total 765 10226
Rate (per day) 107.80 1494.28
Unique Redditors 596 3440
Combined Score 31658 33963

Top Submitters' Top Submissions

  1. 4526 points, 1 submission: Alexsayzz
    1. Anti-crypto propaganda... promoted by American Express (4526 points, 513 comments)
  2. 2391 points, 2 submissions: MoonMan_666
    1. Someone just paid $0.10 to move $194M (29,999 BTC). Think about how powerful that is for a second. (2369 points, 380 comments)
    2. Dev sends Bitcoin without using the web or the power grid (22 points, 4 comments)
  3. 2077 points, 1 submission: _Logicrypto
    1. When your boss thanks you for staying late at work but you were just watching the Bitcoin price and lost track of time (2077 points, 69 comments)
  4. 1496 points, 1 submission: bitbug42
    1. ⚡Lightning Network at the Senate - Counterargument to Roubini's speech that Bitcoin can never scale to serve the planet (1496 points, 186 comments)
  5. 1417 points, 1 submission: opencoins
    1. Why sell and pay capital gains, why not wait for mass adoption? That's my motto. (1417 points, 244 comments)
  6. 1174 points, 1 submission: awertheim
    1. Took a while but finally part of the picture club (had to wait on the web browser update!) (1174 points, 127 comments)
  7. 853 points, 1 submission: Hodl_it
    1. Feeling good? (853 points, 215 comments)
  8. 833 points, 1 submission: cointastical
    1. Bitcoin ATM operator gets the $62,500 that police confiscated back (833 points, 110 comments)
  9. 802 points, 2 submissions: JandyJammer
    1. Congratulations US senators for understanding crypto better than this guy (748 points, 125 comments)
    2. How is Bitmex the biggest exchange... total joke. I hope their competitors crush them. (54 points, 49 comments)
  10. 704 points, 1 submission: lesbiansareoverrated
    1. ...in case you missed the laura shill burn today (704 points, 100 comments)
  11. 512 points, 5 submissions: castorfromtheva
    1. Mycelium wallet will FINALLY get segwit! "This month" as stated by Mycelium developers on 9 October 2018. Glad to hear! I am excited. (312 points, 136 comments)
    2. Just saw it on their website: Ledger Nano S 20% off, directly from manufacturer! For six days, starting today. Just in case you consider getting a hardware wallet. (146 points, 84 comments)
    3. Newsflash: Bitfinex Unveils ‘Distributed Banking Solution,’ Resumes Fiat Deposits (44 points, 8 comments)
    4. Binance Uganda Launch 80% Ready As Users Can Now Sign Up: Deposits & Trading Coming Soon (8 points, 1 comment)
    5. Article: "Cryptos at a turning point", trustnodes.com (2 points, 0 comments)
  12. 510 points, 4 submissions: eddieweng
    1. Someone moved 12,220 BTC ($82M) in block 545,877 (393 points, 180 comments)
    2. Someone moved 22,200 BTC ($139M) in block 545,243 (90 points, 38 comments)
    3. CoinMarketBull – CoinMarketCap, but with a different metric (26 points, 4 comments)
    4. holdernews - trending stories on bitcointalk (1 point, 0 comments)
  13. 387 points, 1 submission: StoneHammers
    1. We are three months away from Bitcoins 10 year anniversary. (387 points, 39 comments)
  14. 366 points, 3 submissions: TrackCoinMarket-com
    1. Citizens of Venezuela have turned to Bitcoin and gold farming in online games to survive the country’s economic collapse. (365 points, 60 comments)
    2. Zambian Central Bank Declares Bitcoin Is Not Legal Tender (1 point, 7 comments)
    3. Bitcoin is Maturing, Crypto Growth Surprisingly Positive Reveals Study (0 points, 3 comments)
  15. 358 points, 1 submission: musicfan39
    1. Bitcoin all-time price graph (Aug 2010 – Oct 2018) (358 points, 84 comments)
  16. 311 points, 5 submissions: TheGreatMuffin
    1. Bitfinex' statement on fiat deposits/withdrawals (tldr: fiat and crypto withdrawals working, fiat deposits temporarily paused) (103 points, 52 comments)
    2. Bitfinex suspends all fiat deposits, “expects the situation to normalize within a week” (78 points, 62 comments)
    3. Fidelity gives a nod to OG cypherpunks (mentioning Adam Back, Nick Szabo, David Chaum) and bitcoin's precursors in their newest blog post (78 points, 0 comments)
    4. full video of the US Senate hearing on cryptocurrency: with P. Van Valkenburgh and N. Roubini as witnesses (starts at minute 16) (31 points, 5 comments)
    5. Interview with one of the creators of the Samourai wallet (21 points, 1 comment)
  17. 305 points, 1 submission: 6maud
    1. Jamie Dimon: Bitcoin is a scam. Also Jamie Dimon: Let's file 20 blockchain patents so we don't miss out on this blockchain thing. facepalm (305 points, 93 comments)
  18. 274 points, 2 submissions: undertheradar48
    1. $6.9 trillion of assets just got access to the world of crypto! (169 points, 24 comments)
    2. 1.65 Million people are attending over 5,000 Bitcoin meetups around the world. Organic interest/curiosity is real! (105 points, 41 comments)
  19. 265 points, 1 submission: NoGooderr
    1. Shorters, are you okay? (265 points, 123 comments)
  20. 253 points, 5 submissions: _smudger_
    1. Bakkt CEO: We're About To See A Cryptocurrency Revolution (130 points, 29 comments)
    2. Our team, launch and advocacy – Bakkt Blog – Medium (104 points, 33 comments)
    3. Coinbase's Adam White is joining Bakkt as its COO - The Block (16 points, 1 comment)
    4. The Bright Side of the 2018 Bitcoin Bear Market – Wes Carlson – Medium (2 points, 0 comments)
    5. Analysis: ErisX & Bakkt Are All in on the Battle for Institutional Cash (1 point, 0 comments)
  21. 247 points, 1 submission: Fly115
    1. It would be impossible for every Fidelity brokerage customer to own even one Bitcoin. This is why Bitcoins are worth thousands of dollars, while a dollar is only worth one dollar (and only until next year when when it's worth 97 cents). - Erik Voorhees (247 points, 129 comments)
  22. 237 points, 1 submission: manfromnantucket1984
    1. Bear markets are for building! 🐻⚡ While the price is doing what it does, we continue to build the #LightningNetwork at the #LightningHackdayNYC in New York on October 27th/28th 2018. Speakers like Christian Decker, Matt Corallo and Peter Todd will take you down the rabbit hole. (237 points, 15 comments)
  23. 232 points, 1 submission: TheMidnightMatinee
    1. Guys lets rally and show your support for an BTC ETF! Here's why! (232 points, 63 comments)
  24. 231 points, 2 submissions: installeris
    1. Fidelity just made it easier for hedge funds and other pros to invest in cryptocurrencies (169 points, 36 comments)
    2. Nouriel Roubini has always been talking sh*t about Bitcoin. And he's always wrong. (62 points, 29 comments)
  25. 226 points, 1 submission: lewtr
    1. An easter egg in the Bitcoin genesis block code (226 points, 40 comments)
  26. 218 points, 1 submission: Unusual_Mountain
    1. Bitcoin as a safe haven from monetary policy can help keep governments and banks honest. It doesn't have to replace them. (218 points, 85 comments)
  27. 214 points, 1 submission: Mobilenewsflash
    1. Roubini (214 points, 50 comments)
  28. 212 points, 1 submission: CardCollector1
    1. Getting Started with BTCPay Server - Free and Open Source Bitcoin and Lightning Network payment processor (212 points, 75 comments)
  29. 201 points, 1 submission: yonstonston
    1. Sorry guys, i bought BTC yesterday... (201 points, 72 comments)
  30. 161 points, 2 submissions: linzex
    1. A Bitcoin Lesson From A Yogi Master (93 points, 6 comments)
    2. ChangeNow Exchange Accused of $70,000 Theft (68 points, 8 comments)
  31. 159 points, 3 submissions: zappadoing
    1. greetings from holidays - I thought I won't have to read anything about bitcoin this time... (130 points, 12 comments)
    2. Telegram down! Lots of Bitcoin-Groups not accessible. We need something decentralized. (19 points, 26 comments)
    3. Colleges Are Baffled by Bitcoin Donations (10 points, 0 comments)
  32. 159 points, 1 submission: Crevative
    1. Zimbabwe spirals into economic chaos as fears of another round of hyperinflation begin to spark - another fiat currency fails! (159 points, 20 comments)
  33. 147 points, 1 submission: lexihayes99
    1. Just wanted to remind people of a simpler time :) (147 points, 196 comments)
  34. 146 points, 1 submission: Rare_Ad
    1. Bitcoin was a tool that was born of the economic crisis some 10 years ago, does that mean another big recession or banking collapse could catapult it forward? (146 points, 87 comments)
  35. 146 points, 1 submission: vmrey
    1. Buda, the largest crypto exchange by volume in Chile, is one of the first to incorporate Lightning network. (146 points, 14 comments)
  36. 145 points, 1 submission: wwwdata
    1. I own crypto but not Bitcoin. (145 points, 243 comments)
  37. 141 points, 9 submissions: expertbit
    1. This E-Bike Accepts Payments With Bitcoin's Lightning Network (51 points, 3 comments)
    2. Bitcoin [BTC] transfers will become a lot faster with Liquid Network, says Jimmy Song (37 points, 58 comments)
    3. Top Universities Are Now Investing in Cryptocurrency Funds (18 points, 0 comments)
    4. Indian Exchange Unocoin Could Launch Crypto ATMs (17 points, 0 comments)
    5. Bitcoin Price Stability -- A Bullish Or Bearish Sign? (15 points, 1 comment)
    6. Don’t Underestimate China’s Power In Bitcoin (2 points, 3 comments)
    7. Bitcoin Price Analysis: Bulls Defend Yearly Support Amidst Wall Street Slump (1 point, 0 comments)
    8. Bitcoin Network Comes To A Standstill In China (0 points, 2 comments)
    9. Bitcoin Price Jumps by $600 to Reach One-Month High Above $6.9k (0 points, 0 comments)
  38. 137 points, 1 submission: diditmakesound
    1. Everyone still buying right now (137 points, 30 comments)
  39. 135 points, 1 submission: gattacibus
    1. POLONIEX suspends Bitcoin withdrawals (135 points, 86 comments)
  40. 129 points, 3 submissions: nopara73
    1. Wasabi Wallet added OSX support. Please consider testing it. (55 points, 25 comments)
    2. Scoring Bitcoin Wallets (38 points, 25 comments)
    3. A Technical Overview of Wasabi Wallet, Future Ideas, Plans and Strategy (36 points, 1 comment)
  41. 123 points, 1 submission: Big_Bluefin
    1. Live from Fremont Street in Las Vegas (123 points, 20 comments)
  42. 121 points, 1 submission: agustinf
    1. Latin American Exchange Buda.com adds Lightning Network payments for all. (121 points, 17 comments)
  43. 118 points, 2 submissions: TheCrunk1
    1. Fidelity launches new company for trading, storing cryptocurrencies (98 points, 26 comments)
    2. Binance launches fiat-to-crypto exchange in Uganda (20 points, 7 comments)
  44. 112 points, 1 submission: Thinkmoreaboutit
    1. "Over the weekend I sent a bitcoin transaction to a relay 12.6km away with no cell network or internet connection. Here's a tweetstorm about how I used @gotenna and @SamouraiWallet to do it" [email protected] (112 points, 20 comments)
  45. 111 points, 1 submission: Jackieknows
    1. When it comes to your coins, keep it quiet. – Trezor Blog (111 points, 10 comments)
  46. 110 points, 1 submission: 100ravp
    1. Someone solved the 310.00 BTC challenge (110 points, 87 comments)
  47. 110 points, 1 submission: loulan
    1. There was an attempt (110 points, 78 comments)
  48. 106 points, 1 submission: king-only
    1. Breez, a Lightning Network mobile client, is now fully open sourced (106 points, 19 comments)
  49. 101 points, 2 submissions: HodlingToTheMoon
    1. Websites using Joomla (second most popular platform after Wordpress), can now be enabled with Bitcoin payments - In less than 5 min! (98 points, 5 comments)
    2. Got business on your mind? Here are 7 easy and genuine ideas to start a Bitcoin-centric e-commerce store! (3 points, 0 comments)
  50. 98 points, 1 submission: ubunt2
    1. Fidelity Starts Crypto Unit to Serve Wall Street Customers (98 points, 4 comments)
  51. 97 points, 1 submission: CosmicHemorroid
    1. Lightning Powered E-bike #Reckless (97 points, 22 comments)
  52. 96 points, 3 submissions: DesignerAccount
    1. Bitcoin is all grown up! (83 points, 6 comments)
    2. [Bitcoin OpSec - Keep your coins safe] Detailed breakdown of sophisticated scam (12 points, 6 comments)
    3. Infographic - How do UTXOs work? (1 point, 0 comments)
  53. 96 points, 1 submission: bowlingfries
    1. Bitcoin kiosk in Portland OR weed dispensary (96 points, 21 comments)
  54. 94 points, 1 submission: nassimmontreal
    1. #roubinilovescrypto (94 points, 37 comments)
  55. 92 points, 2 submissions: ella11price
    1. Selling goods and items for Bitcoin should be easy. I built a marketplace similar to eBay so people can sell anything for crypto. This video explains it. (91 points, 63 comments)
    2. The best ways to earn bitcoin and cryptocurrency. Includes how to spot a scam (1 point, 0 comments)
  56. 91 points, 1 submission: ytcoinartist
    1. The Golden Pineapple, a 3D combination puzzle for all ages and free to play. Be the first to solve the final level and win 1 BTC, courtesy of The Pineapple Fund. http://pineapplearcade.net/arcade-game/pineapple (91 points, 25 comments)
  57. 89 points, 1 submission: Rachsuchtig
    1. An BTC ATM at Austria/Salzburg Shopping Arena, totally surprised to see (89 points, 11 comments)
  58. 87 points, 2 submissions: Ishan1121
    1. Bitcoin proves once again its the best way to transfer money! $194 million transferred for 10 cents. (87 points, 18 comments)
    2. Discussion: So Bitcoin rises as fake news on Binance delisting Tether (USDT) goes viral...removing Tether completley will affect the market positively? THoughts? (0 points, 6 comments)
  59. 87 points, 1 submission: Blixx87
    1. I finally figured it out! We have been forming a Dorito Pattern and it’s on it’s way to the cheese dip. (87 points, 49 comments)
  60. 86 points, 8 submissions: EffigyBoy
    1. Venezuelans Play RuneScape To Make Small Profit In Bitcoin (31 points, 4 comments)
    2. CFTC Chair On Bitcoin Expansion: "We Are Seeing More Institutional Movement Into This Area" (26 points, 0 comments)
    3. The Indian Government is Considering to Launch Its Own Cryptocurrency to Avoid Citizens Using Bitcoin (13 points, 14 comments)
    4. The Congress Is Groping In The Dark To Handle Cryptocurrencies. Bitcoin has come into the mainstream. (6 points, 0 comments)
    5. After Stock Markets Plunge Cryptocurrency Whale Dumps over 22 100 BTC (5 points, 11 comments)
    6. Scientific Journal 'Chaos' Favors Bitcoin – As stable as Oil and Dollar Markets (2 points, 1 comment)
    7. The First Physical Cryptocurrency Store in The U.S. Launches on October 20 (2 points, 1 comment)
    8. Omniex and Gemini Struck A Partnership to Support Institutional Investors (1 point, 0 comments)
  61. 85 points, 2 submissions: jakesonwu
    1. Release - Eclair v0.2-beta7 - Compatible with Bitcoin Core 0.17.0 (75 points, 8 comments)
    2. Lord Keynes Would Be Proud (10 points, 1 comment)
  62. 84 points, 2 submissions: renepickhardt
    1. ECDSA is not that bad: two-party signing without Schnorr or BLS (by Stepan Snigirev) (53 points, 7 comments)
    2. Last week in Lightning Network: A weekly collection of lightning network (and related) news on Twitter (31 points, 6 comments)
  63. 83 points, 3 submissions: OldCarpet54
    1. [GIVEAWAY] Crypto Invest Summit – Wozniak, Gupta, Morehead (82 points, 1 comment)
    2. blockchain news: from SF Blockchain Week and XBlockchain (1 point, 0 comments)
    3. Buterin | SpankChain | Kambria: San Francisco Blockchain Week (0 points, 0 comments)
  64. 83 points, 1 submission: -elektro-pionir-
    1. AMA with Bitcoin engineer Jameson Lopp (83 points, 21 comments)
  65. 80 points, 3 submissions: ysangkok
    1. Bitcoin script discussion at Scaling Bitcoin: "Sporks are probabilistic soft-forks [...] where instead of [...] version bits if the blockhash has some [...] PoW below some threshold, it activates. [...] [E.g.] you have an expectation of 6 months to get your shit together. Doing it live." (28 points, 3 comments)
    2. Multi-Hop Locks for Secure, Privacy-Preserving and Interoperable Payment-Channel Networks (27 points, 8 comments)
    3. Scaling Bitcoin Kaizen - Scriptless scripts, adaptor signatures and their applications (25 points, 2 comments)
  66. 78 points, 3 submissions: mkuraja
    1. What's the difference between Lightning Network and Liquid Network? (57 points, 41 comments)
    2. Need some fresh, new FOMO in your life? Reenter, Trace Mayer. (15 points, 1 comment)
    3. This American tourist thought I'd see "Bitcoin Accepted Here" all over Tokyo, Japan but not one place found yet. (6 points, 17 comments)
  67. 77 points, 1 submission: Miladran
    1. Fidelity Says It Will Trade Bitcoin for Hedge Funds (77 points, 1 comment)
  68. 77 points, 1 submission: pandaman200
    1. Swiss Crypto Fund Obtains Country’s First Crypto Asset Management License (77 points, 4 comments)
  69. 75 points, 3 submissions: mickhick95
    1. I purchased a goTenna to broadcast my BTC transactions with TxTenna and Samourai Wallet. (44 points, 15 comments)
    2. I saw a Bitcoin ATM and I had to make a purchase. (28 points, 41 comments)
    3. 303-ish Days in the BTC Bear Market, This Sideways Motion Looks Like A Turn Around!!! (3 points, 16 comments)
  70. 75 points, 1 submission: hcarpach
    1. Venezuelan cryptocurrency miner: “we are police’s most wanted” (75 points, 21 comments)
  71. 73 points, 6 submissions: WorkCoin_Team
    1. “Bitcoin enables certain uses that are very unique. I think it offers possibilities that no other currency allows. For example the ability to spend a coin that only occurs when two separate parties agree to spend the coin; with a third party that couldn’t run away with the coin itself.” – Pieter Wui (66 points, 14 comments)
    2. Revolution of Bitcoin (5 points, 3 comments)
    3. A Funny Bitcoin Thought (2 points, 20 comments)
    4. Getting started with Bitcoin (0 points, 1 comment)
    5. Make your foundation strong (0 points, 0 comments)
    6. What are you not willing to compromise? (0 points, 6 comments)
  72. 73 points, 1 submission: ozdixon
    1. Bitcoin accepted at a absenth bar in Prague. (73 points, 11 comments)
  73. 72 points, 1 submission: Itasia
    1. What Are Atomic Swaps? Ultimate Guide (72 points, 16 comments)
  74. 71 points, 1 submission: MannyAndDrChurchShow
    1. I wonder if they would still honor this card.... (71 points, 9 comments)
  75. 68 points, 4 submissions: grittygatorr
    1. Liquid Network - the world’s first production Bitcoin sidechain has officially gone live (65 points, 100 comments)
    2. XDEX Advertises Commission-Free Bitcoin Trading in Brazil (2 points, 0 comments)
    3. Coinfloor to Cut on Staff and Reorganize Amid Volume Fluctuations in the Crypto Markets (1 point, 0 comments)
    4. Barclays Temporarily Suspends Work on Cryptocurrency Trading Project (0 points, 1 comment)
  76. 68 points, 1 submission: WouterGlorieux
    1. Introducing 'The Bitcoin Spellbook': an open-source REST API server for the back-end of (almost) any Bitcoin application. (Think of it as your own IfThisThenThat server but for Bitcoin) (68 points, 3 comments)
  77. 67 points, 1 submission: Vaultoro_official
    1. Leading up to the LightingNetwork Hackathon in NY, I thought I would post the talks we filmed at the Berlin lightningHackDay. Some amazing talks! (67 points, 1 comment)
  78. 65 points, 1 submission: Komodor123
    1. Do you speak more than one language? Then help spread Bitcoin around the world by translating Bitcoin.org! (65 points, 28 comments)
  79. 63 points, 1 submission: Sandiegosurf1
    1. Fidelity Launches Institutional Crypto Trading and Clearing. Let the institutional money flow! (63 points, 1 comment)
  80. 63 points, 1 submission: TearAnus-SoreAssRekt
    1. Buying PC Games With Bitcoin: Site Reviews (with some accepting Lightning!) (63 points, 7 comments)
  81. 62 points, 1 submission: CryptoCloaks
    1. We finally got our RaspiBlitz case to a level we love! Time for load testing to check thermals, final mods are almost done! (62 points, 10 comments)
  82. 61 points, 1 submission: sagiher
    1. #Liberte#CaribbeanBitcoin#ShoutOutToAllBitcoinDeveloperOutThere (61 points, 9 comments)

Top Commenters

  1. PragmaticParadox (465 points, 7 comments)
  2. ikarienator (462 points, 1 comment)
  3. Hanspanzer (434 points, 106 comments)
  4. Toyake (434 points, 71 comments)
  5. uglymelt (394 points, 3 comments)
  6. UsherTechs (377 points, 1 comment)
  7. isdudu (345 points, 4 comments)
  8. TyroneTheDriver (307 points, 1 comment)
  9. Rattlesnake_Mullet (296 points, 11 comments)
  10. andycam7 (282 points, 3 comments)
  11. dmdeemer (275 points, 1 comment)
  12. BTCkoning (266 points, 114 comments)
  13. CP70 (257 points, 7 comments)
  14. ascension8438 (239 points, 7 comments)
  15. Fly115 (226 points, 9 comments)
  16. haribo_2016 (220 points, 4 comments)
  17. dsmid (214 points, 1 comment)
  18. i_gotta_say (208 points, 87 comments)
  19. TheGreatMuffin (206 points, 56 comments)
  20. ebaley (198 points, 34 comments)
  21. bitsteiner (185 points, 86 comments)
  22. Redditridder (181 points, 5 comments)
  23. KupKhunKrap (173 points, 36 comments)
  24. 45sbvad (169 points, 3 comments)
  25. c3corvette (165 points, 2 comments)
  26. killerstorm (163 points, 8 comments)
  27. evilgrinz (158 points, 48 comments)
  28. chronic_nervosa (140 points, 1 comment)
  29. bigdaddysdick (136 points, 7 comments)
  30. castorfromtheva (129 points, 27 comments)
  31. Touchmyhandle (125 points, 12 comments)
  32. Euphoricsoul (122 points, 1 comment)
  33. WaterMac27 (122 points, 1 comment)
  34. DSXIII (118 points, 1 comment)
  35. RIMS_REAL_BIG (117 points, 24 comments)
  36. cryptogrip (112 points, 39 comments)
  37. WalterRyan (108 points, 10 comments)
  38. sudophant (107 points, 5 comments)
  39. NotSeeTroll (104 points, 37 comments)
  40. deadleg22 (104 points, 10 comments)
  41. shared_makes_it_real (103 points, 26 comments)
  42. alexiglesias007 (103 points, 7 comments)
  43. Buttoshi (102 points, 68 comments)
  44. flunderbossanova (102 points, 59 comments)
  45. lexihayes99 (101 points, 28 comments)
  46. mabezard (101 points, 2 comments)
  47. peniswithahoodie (98 points, 1 comment)
  48. beloboi (96 points, 65 comments)
  49. vovr (89 points, 3 comments)
  50. segells4soulsmogoblo (89 points, 1 comment)
  51. damchi (87 points, 21 comments)
  52. smadgerano (81 points, 14 comments)
  53. time_wasted504 (80 points, 34 comments)
  54. joeknowswhoiam (80 points, 16 comments)
  55. diydude2 (79 points, 26 comments)
  56. sQtWLgK (79 points, 17 comments)
  57. 989x4000 (78 points, 22 comments)
  58. sreaka (78 points, 16 comments)
  59. YoungScholar89 (78 points, 6 comments)
  60. Ellipso (76 points, 2 comments)
  61. HitsABlunt (76 points, 1 comment)
  62. almkglor (75 points, 39 comments)
  63. MrRGnome (75 points, 37 comments)
  64. Daddeus65 (75 points, 28 comments)
  65. whalecheetah (75 points, 25 comments)
  66. BCash_BeTrash (75 points, 23 comments)
  67. cipher-space (75 points, 19 comments)
  68. bnuttall (72 points, 2 comments)
  69. chrisrico (71 points, 26 comments)
  70. esdraelon (71 points, 8 comments)
  71. ale1ormont (71 points, 2 comments)
  72. igadjeed (70 points, 42 comments)
  73. Holographiks (70 points, 19 comments)
  74. frankieboy07 (70 points, 2 comments)
  75. snazzycoins (69 points, 12 comments)
  76. dmar198 (69 points, 11 comments)
  77. protoman86 (69 points, 7 comments)
  78. bitbug42 (68 points, 5 comments)
  79. CardCollector1 (66 points, 16 comments)
  80. hawks5999 (66 points, 7 comments)
  81. DefiantVerse (65 points, 12 comments)
  82. psionides (65 points, 8 comments)
  83. btc-forextrader (64 points, 37 comments)
  84. UniqueNewQuark (63 points, 5 comments)
  85. imaducksfan (63 points, 1 comment)
  86. bitusher (62 points, 23 comments)
  87. homad (62 points, 13 comments)
  88. torbitonsa (62 points, 7 comments)
  89. violencequalsbad (62 points, 7 comments)
  90. wwwdata (61 points, 20 comments)
  91. LadyRosedancer (61 points, 1 comment)
  92. Nunoyabiznes (60 points, 22 comments)
  93. pg3crypto (60 points, 13 comments)
  94. XxArmadaxX (60 points, 4 comments)
  95. awertheim (59 points, 27 comments)
  96. Ploxxx69 (59 points, 1 comment)
  97. TheGlassStone (59 points, 1 comment)
  98. moodytomatoes (58 points, 39 comments)
  99. Sneakybobo (58 points, 13 comments)
  100. UniqueCandy (58 points, 8 comments)

Top Submissions

  1. Anti-crypto propaganda... promoted by American Express by Alexsayzz (4526 points, 513 comments)
  2. Someone just paid $0.10 to move $194M (29,999 BTC). Think about how powerful that is for a second. by MoonMan_666 (2369 points, 380 comments)
  3. When your boss thanks you for staying late at work but you were just watching the Bitcoin price and lost track of time by _Logicrypto (2077 points, 69 comments)
  4. ⚡Lightning Network at the Senate - Counterargument to Roubini's speech that Bitcoin can never scale to serve the planet by bitbug42 (1496 points, 186 comments)
  5. Why sell and pay capital gains, why not wait for mass adoption? That's my motto. by opencoins (1417 points, 244 comments)
  6. Took a while but finally part of the picture club (had to wait on the web browser update!) by awertheim (1174 points, 127 comments)
  7. Feeling good? by Hodl_it (853 points, 215 comments)
  8. Bitcoin ATM operator gets the $62,500 that police confiscated back by cointastical (833 points, 110 comments)
  9. Congratulations US senators for understanding crypto better than this guy by JandyJammer (748 points, 125 comments)
  10. ...in case you missed the laura shill burn today by lesbiansareoverrated (704 points, 100 comments)

Top Comments

  1. 462 points: ikarienator's comment in Feeling good?
  2. 456 points: PragmaticParadox's comment in Anti-crypto propaganda... promoted by American Express
  3. 387 points: uglymelt's comment in ⚡Lightning Network at the Senate - Counterargument to Roubini's speech that Bitcoin can never scale to serve the planet
  4. 377 points: UsherTechs's comment in When your boss thanks you for staying late at work but you were just watching the Bitcoin price and lost track of time
  5. 342 points: isdudu's comment in Anti-crypto propaganda... promoted by American Express
  6. 307 points: TyroneTheDriver's comment in Anti-crypto propaganda... promoted by American Express
  7. 276 points: andycam7's comment in Why sell and pay capital gains, why not wait for mass adoption? That's my motto.
  8. 275 points: dmdeemer's comment in Someone just paid $0.10 to move $194M (29,999 BTC). Think about how powerful that is for a second.
  9. 268 points: Rattlesnake_Mullet's comment in Someone moved 12,220 BTC ($82M) in block 545,877
  10. 244 points: CP70's comment in Anti-crypto propaganda... promoted by American Express
Generated with BBoe's Subreddit Stats
submitted by subreddit_stats to subreddit_stats [link] [comments]

Understanding Bitcoin Properly

Bitcoin is a what you can call a new type of online currency, a crypt-currency. This crypts-currency was propose in the late 90's by a group known as cypherpunks who mainly discussed about cryptography and security and among them was, for a currency that would be totally anonymous and free from the control of large banks and governments. around the late 2008 this guy named "Satoshi Nakamoto" wrote a rocking paper describing this concept of a a P2P payment system that would use the concept discussed by the early cypherpunks.
If you don't know why some intelligent folks are excited about the Bitcoin concept, you should take the time to understand. Bitcoin is a new form of currency that is accepted worldwide and can never be debased by politicians trying to get re-elected or countries trying to pay off huge debts. In a world in which the value of paper money is constantly ravaged by inflation, that's a very attractive attribute. Also, the world is very much ready for a "global" currency. Bitcoin satisfies that need.
Bitcoins are like cash in that they aren't tied to your identity, and transactions made with Bitcoins are irreversible and untraceable. But they're like credits in a manner that they aren't physical. Bitcoins are a peer to peer system.
What Bitcoin allows you to do is to send money to people, make purchases, just like real cash, only difference is this is online. Bitcoin in most ways behave like hard cash . you can give it to person to person, you can loose it, and destroy it.
Well, Bitcoin address is different from any other address system you may have encountered before, A bitcoin address consists of two addresses the public address and the private address. Like the name suggests the public address is public and can be distributed to any one and every one without any fear. the private address is the one you keep very private and secret and dont even tell that to any one at all. You keep it so secret, that no one can access it.
A bitcoin address is a hash of a public portion of a public/private ECDSA keypair and they looks like this:- 1La9GFB8sNRko99jP2N5AMQYPvmsDoVbKb. Bitcoin is in its infancy, a free market currency whose price or value is determined by the demand and supply. A multitude of factors could in theory affect Bitcoin prices, nobody in the current scenario can conclude that only a few factors affect Bitcoin, I will try to explain only “a few” that have had a considerable impact on Bitcoin prices recently, many more may be yet to be known.
Like gold prices that fluctuate due to a variety of factors, some of the factors which have been observed till date are listed below:
Media Exposure
The initial growth of the Bitcoin ecosystem and prices was attributed to media articles, familiarizing it to more people. The world’s supply of Bitcoins is essentially fixed, but because people in the media keep talking about it, demand keeps rising. This leads to higher prices—and as prices go up, people who currently hold Bitcoins develop greater and greater expectations for the currency. Today, the excitement around Bitcoin is still confined to a tiny segment of the population — technology aficionados, monetary idealists and speculators. The potential for exposure is large.
Eurozone Crisis
A direct correlation between the Cypress bailout and Bitcoin price was observed. Some of the investors in Europe moved their investments into Bitcoin around the time of the Cypress bailout. This resulted in a huge cash flow into the Bitcoin ecosystem.
Hoarding
Demand crisis: Like any currency, Bitcoin is traded on exchanges, Bitcoin holders hoard their stash, which further reduces supply, which in turn boosts the price and sparks yet more media attention—and the cycle continues till profit selling takes place like in any currency.
Fear of Govt intervention
There is nothing illegal about Bitcoin . Cash is as anonymous and not tied to identity. But could government grow increasingly interested in defending its paper-money monopoly? We've already seen hints of this. But because the market is already huge and global, there will be growing attempts to control it, tax it and regulate it.
Trading Exchange outages
Trading exchanges like MTgox which handles almost 70% of trade have seen trading halted due to DDos's, but such events are seen to be temporary and the a price fall due to a DDos is usually recovered when trading resumes to normal levels, leaving only a temporary effect. Smaller exchanges have been hacked due to insecure design of the sites . The interim crashes could be sharp and scary. The Bitcoin algorithm, system and framework itself is preternaturally sound. As with any new creation, there are glitches and vulnerabilities that still need to be worked out in trading exchanges.
Vendor acceptance
Bitcoins remain very much a niche payment method. In accepting the currency there is a small circle of large Internet companies’ participating in the system. Others include WordPress, which will sell you everything from Web hosting to CSS packages in exchange for Bitcoins. WikiLeaks and 4chan are part of a growing list of online organizations that accept Bitcoin donations. As vendor acceptance improves the value of Bitcoin as a currency improves.
Free market currency
Being in its infancy, Bitcoin will see wild price swings till it becomes established as a currency. The market is still in a price discovery stage and is expected to stabilize at a certain point, where its value and place as currency is usable in daily life.
You can use Bitcoins with people and business that accept Bitcoins. as a new currency there are not many brick and mortar stores that accept Bitcoins, but there are online services that may be purchased with Bitcoin. and like any new currency the growth is slow but then number of people and businesses accepting Bitcoin is increasing exponentially.
The Bitcoin algorithm was presented as a scientific paper and peer reviewed like any other scientific paper, the paper was widely accepted and is the sole fundamental of Bitcoin. The algorithm of Bitcoin has been designed so that it is resistant to quantum computers which have not been built as of yet.
All currencies are backed by gold or similar assets. Lets look at gold. What is gold backed by? What decides the value of gold? Demand and supply. What decides the value of Bitcoin? Demand and Supply.
Like gold the amount of Bitcoins is limited, only 21 million Bitcoins will be ever produced. The value of Bitcoin can be equated to how the value of gold is estimated. So the "fundamental" value of Bitcoin can only be estimated the same way the fundamental value of, gold can be estimated — which is guessing at what someone will be willing to pay for it at some time in the future. The whole premise of Bitcoin is that only a finite amount of it will ever be created. This is in stark contrast to standard currencies, the supply of which is continually increased.
Fiat paper currencies are a relic of a past age. It has proven to be a spectacular failure, giving rise to inflations and unending booms and busts. As technology progresses, markets look for an alternative. A single global digital currency is certainly in our future. Bitcoin is just the most successful example of that so far.
Bitcoin can be easily used for international transfers without paying commissions to third parts like banks and cutting down transaction times for bank wires from days to hours for a Bitcoin transaction.
It is always prudent on your part to view Bitcoins objectively and arrive at its value in your life. In my view, Bitcoin is the Internet, applied to Money. We need to remember that Bitcoin is not a stock, a company, or even a regular commodity. It is a technology. That technology is a payment system that is evolving into a real currency. Right now, its most spectacular use is in transferring funds from one person to another. It's as easy as sending a text message on a phone. We live in a digital age. We need a digital currency.
Using Bitcoin:
In order to use Bitcoin, you need a Bitcoin wallet. Bitcoin Wallet is just like your wallet where you keep your money. Wallets come in the form of softwares and web wallets.
Software wallets are simply installed on your computer. With these standalone clients, you are responsible for protecting your money and doing backups. While using these wallets, you need to bewary as some viruses are designed to steal your wallet files and the hacker can easily eat up your Bitcoins. So, I don't suggest these.
However, some software wallets are also released for smartphones. In these types of wallets, there is no need to backup the files as all the data is stored in the servers.
Examples: Bitcoin Official Client, Multibit, Bitcoin Wallet (Mobile), etc.
Web Wallets are the best and easy to use. They are secure as the data is not stored in your computer, it is stored on secure servers. However, it is very important to choose a good provider. Recently, a Web-based Bitcoin Wallet provider, Inputs.io was hacked and the hacker stole everything. This resulted in loss of millions of dollars. I suggest you to choose Blockchain Wallet or Coinbase. CoinBase just raised $25 Million.
I'm using BlockChain wallet here:
  1. First fill out the form at https://blockchain.info/wallet/new.
  2. After registering on BlockChain Wallet, login with your details.
  3. After logging you will see your Bitcoin address.
  4. This is your auto-generated Bitcoin address. You can use this to receive payments.
  5. if you are not satisfied with one address or need more. You can generate more addresses at "Receive Money" tab. First click on the "Receive Money" tab then click at "New Address" button.
How to earn:
  1. Purchase some Bitcoins at low prices and then sell them at high prices.
  2. Website Revenue: Earn from your website by adding non-annoying ads. These ads are very simple and clean. This is the way I earn Bitcoins. I'm talking about Anonymous-Ads - http://a-ads.com/.
  3. The other way is by using Bitcoin Faucet. But, these faucets are useless as the pay amount is very extreme low. You need to visit Faucets every hour and enter your address. They'll send you a payment in few hours.
Spending your Bitcoins is easy:
There are hundreds of retailers that accept Bitcoin. If you want a domain or hosting, go to NameCheap.com.
Here is a list of websites that accept Bitcoin: http://www.bitcointrading.com/forum/spen...-bitcoins/ but there are many more available.
You should also join the Bitcoin Community at http://bitcointalk.org...
If you liked this post. Please give it a +1 for my work. It will help me to write more on Bitcoin.
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What is Defi ?  Compound Defi would be worth $179,814 when this happens Konec leta 2021 bo cena Bitcoina 337.080,00 USD. Tukaj je razlog zakaj? bitcoin wiki Adam Gibson - Unfairly Linear Signatures Trading Bitcoin - How Strong is this Bounce?

Bitcoin's security, when used properly with a new address on each transaction, depends on more than just ECDSA: Cryptographic hashes are much stronger than ECDSA under QC. Bitcoin's security was designed to be upgraded in a forward compatible way and could be upgraded if this were considered an imminent threat. Bitcoin's security, when used properly with a new address on each transaction, depends on more than just ECDSA: Cryptographic hashes are much stronger than ECDSA under QC. Bitcoin's security was designed to be upgraded in a forward compatible way and could be upgraded if this were considered an imminent threat. LocalBitcoins is a bitcoin startup company based in Helsinki, Finland. Its service facilitates over-the-counter trading of local currency for bitcoins. Users post advertisements on the website, where they state exchange rates and payment methods for buying or selling bitcoins. Other users reply to these advertisements and agree to meet the person to buy bitcoins with cash or pay with online Bitcoin. The set of principles that secure a Coin from the State. The term and principles are defined by Satoshi in “Bitcoin: A Peer-to-Peer Electronic Cash System”. Consensus. An agreement among People. Also the set of people who participate in an agreement. Coin. A Consensus regarding a mutually-acceptable medium for Trade. BTC is a Coin ECDSA: Currency created for banks to make faster and more secure transactions: DigiByte: 2014 : DGB: SHA256: Designed to eliminate the weaknesses of Bitcoin & Litecoin Monero: 2014 : XMR: CryptoNight: Designed for anonymous monetary transactions Siacoin: 2015 : SC: blake2b: The main idea of data storage Litecoin: 2011: LTC: Scrypt

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What is Defi ? Compound Defi would be worth $179,814 when this happens

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