Market Data - Coinbase

Decentr ($DEC) - foundational cross-chain and cross-platform DeFi protocol

  1. SUMMARY
Decentr is a protocol designed to make blockchain/DLT mainstream by allowing DeFi applications built on various blockchains to “talk to each other”. Decentr is a 100% secure and decentralised Web 3.0 protocol where users can apply PDV (personal data value) to increase APR on $DEC that users loan out as part of of our DeFi dLoan features, as well as it being applied at PoS when paying for stuff online. Decentr is also building a BAT competitor browser and Chrome/Firefox extension that acts as a gateway to 100% decentralised Web 3.0
Allows DeFi Dapps to access all Decentr’s dFintech features, including dLoan, dPay. Key innovation is that the protocols is based on a user’s ability to leverage the value of their data as exchangeable “currency”.
  1. KEY CONCEPTS

  1. REVENUE MODEL
A fee is charged for every transaction using dPay whereby an exchange takes place between money (fiat and digital) and data, and vice versa, either as part of DeFi features or via a dApp built on Decentr. They are launching pilot programmes in the following industries:
  1. Banking/PSP Industry: On Product launch, due to Decentr’s powerful PSP connections (including the worlds #2 PSP by volume), a medium-scale pilot program will be launched, which will seed the network with 150,000 PSP customers in primarily the Spanish/LAC markets, generating revenue from day one.
  2. “Bricks and Mortar” Supermarket/Grocery Industry: Decentr aims to ensure the long-term competitiveness of “bricks and mortar” supermarkets against online-only grocery retailers, such as Amazon, by a) building secure tech that allows supermarkets to digitise every aspect of their supply chains and operational functions, while b) allowing supermarkets to leverage this incredibly valuable data as a liquid asset class. Expected revenue by Year 5: $114Mn per year.
  3. Online Advertising Industry: Decentr’s 100% decentralised platform credits users secure data with payable value, in the form of PDV, for engaging with ads. The Brave browser was launched in 2012 and in 8 years has reached over 12 million monthly active users, accented by as many as 4.3 million daily active users.
  4. TOKEN $DEC AND SALE
Decentr recently complete their token sale on a purchase portal powered by Dolomite where they raised $974,000 in 10 minutes for a total sale hardcap of 1.25M. The $DEC token is actively trading on multiple exchanges including Uniswap and IDEX. Listed for free on IDEX, Hotbit, Hoo, Coinw, Tidex, BKex. Listed on CoinGecko and Coinmarketcap. Listed on Delta and Blockfolio apps.
➡️ Circulating supply: 61m $DEC.
➡️ Release schedule and token distribution LINK -> NO RELEASE UNTIL 2021.
➡️Contract Address - 0x30f271C9E86D2B7d00a6376Cd96A1cFBD5F0b9b3
➡️Decimals - 18, Ticker - DEC
➡️Uniswap link: https://uniswap.info/pai0x3AEEE5bA053eF8406420DbC5801fC95eC57b0E0A
⭐️ HOW TO BUY VIDEO: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iloAiv2oCRc&feature=youtu.be
$DEC Token utility:
A tradeable unit of value that is both internal and external to the Decentr platform.A unit of conversion between fiat entering and exiting the Decentr ecosystem.A way to capture the value of user data and combines the activity of every participant of the platform performing payment (dPay), or lending and borrowing (dLend), i.e a way to peg PDV to tangible/actionable value.Method of payment in the Decentr ecosystem.A method to internally underwrite the “Deconomy.
  1. NOTABLE SUPPORTERS
Simon Dedic - chief of Blockfyre: https://twitter.com/scoinaldo/status/1283787644221218817?s=20https://twitter.com/scoinaldo/status/1283719917657894912?s=21
Spectre Group Pick : https://twitter.com/SPECTREGRP/status/1284761576873041920https://twitter.com/llluckyl/status/1283765481716015111?s=21
Patrons of the Moon/Lil Uzi: https://t.me/patronsofthemoon/6764
CryptoGems: https://twitter.com/cryptogems_com/status/1283719318379925506?s=09t
tehMoonwalker pick who is a TOP 5 influencer per Binance:https://twitter.com/tehMoonwalkestatus/1284123961996050432?s=20https://twitter.com/binance/status/1279049822113198080
Holochain was one of their earliest supporters and they share a deep connection (recently an AMA was conducted in their TG group): https://medium.com/@DecentrNet/decentr-holochain-ama-29d662caed03
  1. UPCOMING NEWS
--------------------------------------------
  1. RESOURCES:
Website: https://decentr.net
Telegram: https://t.me/DecentrNet
Medium: https://medium.com/@DecentrNet
Twitter: https://twitter.com/DecentrNet
Whitepaper: https://decentr.net/files/Decentr_Whitepaper_V1.4.pdf
Technical Whitepaper: https://decentr.net/files/Decentr_Technical_Whitepaper_Data_As_Economic_Currency.pdf
Recent Articles:
⚡️- https://medium.com/@DecentrNet/decentr-token-sale-metrics-and-distribution-483bb3c58d05
⚡️- https://medium.com/@DecentrNet/how-decentrs-defi-dloan-function-benefits-dec-holders-97ff64a0c105
⚡️- https://medium.com/@DecentrNet/3-vertical-revenue-streams-decentr-is-targeting-4fa1f3dd62de
⚡️- https://medium.com/@DecentrNet/brave-browser-the-good-the-bad-and-the-fundamentally-misguided-8a8593b0ff5b
⚡️- https://medium.com/@DecentrNet/how-decentrs-dfintech-replaces-swift-sct-inst-clearing-house-and-other-payment-solutions-78acacbb4c3f
Chad Gang STRONG Community: https://t.me/decentrtrading
Community News Channel: https://t.me/chadnews
Recent Uniswap trades: https://t.me/dectrades
Wallet holder tracker: https://t.me/DEC_WALLETS_COUNT
submitted by ldd999 to CryptoMoonShots [link] [comments]

The events of a SIM swap attack (and defense tips)

Posted this on Coinbase and someone recommend it also be posted here. The information below on an attempted SIM swap attack was pieced together through a combination of login and security logs, recovering emails initiated by the attacker that were deleted and then deleted again from the trash folder, and learning from AT&T’s fraud representatives. The majority if this is factual, and we do our best to note where we are speculating or providing a circumstantial suspicion. TLDRs at the bottom.
The full story:
We were going about our business and received a text from AT&T that says “…Calls & texts will go to your new phone/SIM card. Call 866-563-4705 if you did not request.” We did not request this, and were suspicious that the text itself could be a phishing scam since we searched the phone number and it wasn’t overtly associated with AT&T. Thus, we tried calling AT&T’s main line at 611 but all we hear is beep beep beep. The phone number is already gone. We use another phone to call AT&T and at the same time start working on our already compromised email.
While we didn’t see everything real time, this is what the recovered emails show. In less than 2 minutes after receiving the text from AT&T, there is already an email indicating that the stolen phone number was used to sign into our email account associated with Coinbase. 2 minutes after that, there is an email from Coinbase saying:
"We have received your request for password reset from an unverified device. As a security precaution, an e-mail with a reset link will be sent to you in 24 hours. Alternatively, if you would like your password reset to be processed immediately, please submit a request using a verified device.
This 24 hour review period is designed to protect your Coinbase account."
This is where Coinbase got it right to have a 24 hour review period (actually a recovery period) before allowing the password to be reset. However, the attackers knew this and planned to steal the second email from Coinbase by setting email rules to forward all emails to a burner address and also have any emails containing “coinbase” re-routed so they don’t appear in the Inbox. 5 minutes later, they request a password reset from Gemini and the password was reset to the attacker’s password within a minute after that. The next minute they target and reset DropBox’s password followed immediately with Binance. Less than 2 minutes later, an email from Binance indicates that the password has been reset and another email arrives a minute later indicating a new device has been authorized.
It’s at this point that we begin locking the attacker out by (1) removing the phone number as 2FA (2) changing the email password, (3) and three forcing a logout of all sessions from the email. There was a bit of back and forth where they still had an active login and re-added the stolen phone number as 2FA.
They added only one more password reset to a gaming account that was not deleted. I can only suspect that was a decoy to make it look like the attack was directed at gaming rather than finances.
The Gemini and Binance accounts were empty and effectively abandoned, with no balances and inactive bank accounts (if any), and no transactions in 1-3 years. DropBox had no meaningful files (they probably look for private keys and authenticator backups) and the phone number they stole from us was suspended, so as far as the attacker is concerned, there is no meat on this bone to attack again… unless they had inside information.
This is where I suspect someone internal at Coinbase receiving wire deposits has been compromised in tipping off ripe accounts – accounts with new and somewhat large balances. We had completed a full withdrawal of funds from Coinbase earlier in the year, and had a balance of less than $20 heading into May. Deposits to Coinbase staggered in to get above six figures through mid-May then stopped. The attack occurred 7 days after the last large wire deposit was made to Coinbase.
From the perspective of an attacker that had no inside information, we were a dead end with abandoned Gemini and Binance accounts with zero balances and stale transactions, no DropBox information, and the suspended phone number access. Our Coinbase deposits were known to no one except us, Coinbase, and our bank. We were also able to stop the hacker’s email forwarding before Coinbase’s 24 hour period to send the password reset, so this one didn’t work out for the attackers and it would make sense for them to move on to the next rather than put efforts into a second attack only for Coinbase - for what would appear to be a zero-balance Coinbase account based on the other stale accounts.
Then…23 hours and 42 minutes after the first attack, another message from AT&T “…Calls & texts will go to your new phone/SIM card. Call 866-563-4705 if you did not request.” Here we go again. We had been confident in AT&T’s assurances that our account had been locked and would not be SIM swapped again, so we unwisely added the phone number back to our email account as a backup (it’s now removed permanently and we use burner emails for account recovery like we should have all along).
Upon seeing that our phone number had been stolen again I knew they were after the Coinbase reset email that was delayed by 24 hours from Coinbase as part of their security. We did 4 things within 2 minutes of that text: (1) removed the phone number again from the email account – this time for good, (2) market sell all Bitcoin on Coinbase, (3) withdraw from Coinbase, (4) have AT&T suspend service on the phone line.
In speaking with AT&T, they were floored that our SIM would be transferred again in light of all the notes about fraud on the account and the PIN being changed to random digits that had never been used by us before. Based on the response of disbelief from AT&T on the second port, I suspect that this attack also involved a compromised AT&T employee that worked with the attacker to provide timely access to the Coinbase password reset email. Apparently, this has been going on for years: https://www.flashpoint-intel.com/blog/sim-swap-fraud-account-takeove
with phone carrier employees swapping SIMs for $80s a swap.
Remember that most of this was hidden in real time, and was only known because we were able to recover emails deleted from Trash by the attacker.
Since we require any withdrawals to use Google Authenticator on Coinbase, our funds may have been secure nonetheless. However, under the circumstances with attackers that were apparently working with insiders to take our phone number twice in attempts to steal Bitcoin, and it being unknown if they had additional tools related to our Google Authenticator, we decided it was safer on the sidelines. The coins were held on the exchange for a quick exit depending on whether Bitcoin was going to break up or down from $10,000. A hardware wallet is always safest, but we were looking to time the market and not have transaction delays.
For some some security recommendations:
AT&T: If you are going to send a text saying that calls and texts are moving to a new number, provide a 10 minute window for the phone number to reply with a “NO” or “STOP” to prevent the move. This can escalate the SIM dispute to more trusted employees to determine who actually owns the line. Don’t let entry level employees swap SIMs.
Coinbase: Do not default to phone numbers as 2FA. Also, if someone logs in successfully with the password before the 24 hours are up, the password is known and there is no need to send the password reset email again for attacker to have forwarded to them. At least have an option to stop the password reset email from being sent. We did not tag our account at Coinbase with fraud because of the stories of frozen funds once an account is tagged. I’m not sure what the solution is there, but that is another problem.
Being a trader, it would be nice to think of Coinbase as any other type of security brokerage where your assets are yours (someone can’t steal your phone number and transfer your stocks to their account). We fell into that mindset of security, yet this experience has reminded us of the uniqueness of cryptocurrency and the lack of custodial assurance and insurance from exchanges because of the possession-is-everything properties of cryptocurrency.
As many have said before, 2FA with a phone number quickly becomes 1-factor authentication as soon as that phone number is associated with password recovery on your email or other accounts. Our overall recommendation is to avoid having a phone number associated with any recovery options across all your accounts.
TLDR on the process:
Scammers will steal your phone number (in our case twice in 24 hours) and use your phone number to access your email and accounts. They will use your email to reset passwords at financial accounts and file hosting such as DropBox. They will then use that combination to transfer any assets they can access from your accounts to theirs. They will do their best to hide this from you by
(1) not resetting your email password so as to raise suspicion,
(2) immediately delete any password reset emails you may receive from financial accounts to hide them from you,
(3) attempt to forward all emails sent to your address to a burner email, and
(4) set email rules to forward emails containing “coinbase” to an email folder other than your Inbox so that you don’t see the transactions and password reset emails that arrive to your inbox.
TLDR on defense tips: If your phone stops working or you receive a text of your number being ported do the following as soon as possible:
(1) log into your email account(s) associated with your financial accounts and remove your phone number as 2FA immediately
(2) change your email password,
(3) force a logout of all sessions from your email (at this point you have locked them out), then
(4) check your mail forwarding settings for forwards to burner addresses,
(5) check your mail rules for rerouting of emails from accounts such as Coinbase, and
(6) call your carrier to have them suspend service on your lost phone number and ask them to reinstate your SIM or get a new SIM. This will require a second phone because your personal phone number has been stolen.
We hope this helps some others be safe out there in protecting their coins. The more we know, the more we can protect ourselves. Wishing you all the best!
submitted by etheregg to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

The events of a SIM swap attack directed at Coinbase (and defense tips)

The information below on an attempted SIM swap attack was pieced together through a combination of login and security logs, recovering emails initiated by the attacker that were deleted and then deleted again from the trash folder, and learning from AT&T’s fraud representatives. The majority if this is factual, and we do our best to note where we are speculating or providing a circumstantial suspicion. TLDRs at the bottom.
The full story:
We were going about our business and received a text from AT&T that says “…Calls & texts will go to your new phone/SIM card. Call 866-563-4705 if you did not request.” We did not request this, and were suspicious that the text itself could be a phishing scam since we searched the phone number and it wasn’t overtly associated with AT&T. Thus, we tried calling AT&T’s main line at 611 but all we hear is beep beep beep. The phone number is already gone. We use another phone to call AT&T and at the same time start working on our already compromised email.
While we didn’t see everything real time, this is what the recovered emails show. In less than 2 minutes after receiving the text from AT&T, there is already an email indicating that the stolen phone number was used to sign into our email account associated with Coinbase. 2 minutes after that, there is an email from Coinbase saying:
"We have received your request for password reset from an unverified device. As a security precaution, an e-mail with a reset link will be sent to you in 24 hours. Alternatively, if you would like your password reset to be processed immediately, please submit a request using a verified device.
This 24 hour review period is designed to protect your Coinbase account."
This is where Coinbase got it right to have a 24 hour review period (actually a recovery period) before allowing the password to be reset. However, the attackers knew this and planned to steal the second email from Coinbase by setting email rules to forward all emails to a burner address and also have any emails containing “coinbase” re-routed so they don’t appear in the Inbox. 5 minutes later, they request a password reset from Gemini and the password was reset to the attacker’s password within a minute after that. The next minute they target and reset DropBox’s password followed immediately with Binance. Less than 2 minutes later, an email from Binance indicates that the password has been reset and another email arrives a minute later indicating a new device has been authorized.
It’s at this point that we begin locking the attacker out by (1) removing the phone number as 2FA (2) changing the email password, (3) and three forcing a logout of all sessions from the email. There was a bit of back and forth where they still had an active login and re-added the stolen phone number as 2FA.
They added only one more password reset to a gaming account that was not deleted. I can only suspect that was a decoy to make it look like the attack was directed at gaming rather than finances.
The Gemini and Binance accounts were empty and effectively abandoned, with no balances and inactive bank accounts (if any), and no transactions in 1-3 years. DropBox had no meaningful files (they probably look for private keys and authenticator backups) and the phone number they stole from us was suspended, so as far as the attacker is concerned, there is no meat on this bone to attack again… unless they had inside information.
This is where I suspect someone internal at Coinbase receiving wire deposits has been compromised in tipping off ripe accounts – accounts with new and somewhat large balances. We had completed a full withdrawal of funds from Coinbase earlier in the year, and had a balance of less than $20 heading into May. Deposits to Coinbase staggered in to get above six figures through mid-May then stopped. The attack occurred 7 days after the last large wire deposit was made to Coinbase.
From the perspective of an attacker that had no inside information, we were a dead end with abandoned Gemini and Binance accounts with zero balances and stale transactions, no DropBox information, and the suspended phone number access. Our Coinbase deposits were known to no one except us, Coinbase, and our bank. We were also able to stop the hacker’s email forwarding before Coinbase’s 24 hour period to send the password reset, so this one didn’t work out for the attackers and it would make sense for them to move on to the next rather than put efforts into a second attack only for Coinbase - for what would appear to be a zero-balance Coinbase account based on the other stale accounts.
Then…23 hours and 42 minutes after the first attack, another message from AT&T “…Calls & texts will go to your new phone/SIM card. Call 866-563-4705 if you did not request.” Here we go again. We had been confident in AT&T’s assurances that our account had been locked and would not be SIM swapped again, so we unwisely added the phone number back to our email account as a backup (it’s now removed permanently and we use burner emails for account recovery like we should have all along).
Upon seeing that our phone number had been stolen again I knew they were after the Coinbase reset email that was delayed by 24 hours from Coinbase as part of their security. We did 4 things within 2 minutes of that text: (1) removed the phone number again from the email account – this time for good, (2) market sell all Bitcoin on Coinbase, (3) withdraw from Coinbase, (4) have AT&T suspend service on the phone line.
In speaking with AT&T, they were floored that our SIM would be transferred again in light of all the notes about fraud on the account and the PIN being changed to random digits that had never been used by us before. Based on the response of disbelief from AT&T on the second port, I suspect that this attack also involved a compromised AT&T employee that worked with the attacker to provide timely access to the Coinbase password reset email. Apparently, this has been going on for years: https://www.flashpoint-intel.com/blog/sim-swap-fraud-account-takeove with phone carrier employees swapping SIMs for $80s a swap.
Remember that most of this was hidden in real time, and was only known because we were able to recover emails deleted from Trash by the attacker.
Since we require any withdrawals to use Google Authenticator on Coinbase, our funds may have been secure nonetheless. However, under the circumstances with attackers that were apparently working with insiders to take our phone number twice in attempts to steal Bitcoin, and it being unknown if they had additional tools related to our Google Authenticator, we decided it was safer on the sidelines. The coins were held on the exchange for a quick exit depending on whether Bitcoin was going to break up or down from $10,000. A hardware wallet is always safest, but we were looking to time the market and not have transaction delays.
For some some security recommendations:
AT&T: If you are going to send a text saying that calls and texts are moving to a new number, provide a 10 minute window for the phone number to reply with a “NO” or “STOP” to prevent the move. This can escalate the SIM dispute to more trusted employees to determine who actually owns the line. Don’t let entry level employees swap SIMs.
Coinbase: Do not default to phone numbers as 2FA. Also, if someone logs in successfully with the password before the 24 hours are up, the password is known and there is no need to send the password reset email again for attacker to have forwarded to them. At least have an option to stop the password reset email from being sent. We did not tag our account at Coinbase with fraud because of the stories of frozen funds once an account is tagged. I’m not sure what the solution is there, but that is another problem.
Being a trader, it would be nice to think of Coinbase as any other type of security brokerage where your assets are yours (someone can’t steal your phone number and transfer your stocks to their account). We fell into that mindset of security, yet this experience has reminded us of the uniqueness of cryptocurrency and the lack of custodial assurance and insurance from exchanges because of the possession-is-everything properties of cryptocurrency.
As many have said before, 2FA with a phone number quickly becomes 1-factor authentication as soon as that phone number is associated with password recovery on your email or other accounts. Our overall recommendation is to avoid having a phone number associated with any recovery options across all your accounts.
TLDR on the process:
Scammers will steal your phone number (in our case twice in 24 hours) and use your phone number to access your email and accounts. They will use your email to reset passwords at financial accounts and file hosting such as DropBox. They will then use that combination to transfer any assets they can access from your accounts to theirs. They will do their best to hide this from you by
(1) not resetting your email password so as to raise suspicion,
(2) immediately delete any password reset emails you may receive from financial accounts to hide them from you,
(3) attempt to forward all emails sent to your address to a burner email, and
(4) set email rules to forward emails containing “coinbase” to an email folder other than your Inbox so that you don’t see the transactions and password reset emails that arrive to your inbox.
TLDR on defense tips: If your phone stops working or you receive a text of your number being ported do the following as soon as possible:
(1) log into your email account(s) associated with your financial accounts and remove your phone number as 2FA immediately
(2) change your email password,
(3) force a logout of all sessions from your email (at this point you have locked them out), then
(4) check your mail forwarding settings for forwards to burner addresses,
(5) check your mail rules for rerouting of emails from accounts such as Coinbase, and
(6) call your carrier to have them suspend service on your lost phone number and ask them to reinstate your SIM or get a new SIM. This will require a second phone because your personal phone number has been stolen.
We hope this helps some others be safe out there in protecting their coins. The more we know, the more we can protect ourselves. Wishing you all the best!
submitted by etheregg to CoinBase [link] [comments]

Comparing exchanges: Coinbase Pro, Cash.App, Kraken, Gemini Active Trader

I've been looking at difference exchanges for buying and withdrawing. My main concerns are security (must have TOTP as used on Google Authenticator or the like), good trading fees, and good deposit/withdrawal fees, maybe a mobile app but not strictly necessary. Time preference for deposits and withdrawals is not huge but faster the better. Also, i'm U.S. based.
Coinbase Pro:
Cash.App:
Kraken:
Gemini Active Trader:
So thoughts? Corrections? Clarifications?
My preference is:
  1. Gemini Active Trader (if I become comfortable with Authy which is not likely, and it means no app, only web)
  2. Kraken (if they'd have ACH deposits)
  3. Coinbase Pro (not as well loved but best combination of security features and fees)
  4. Cash App (well loved but more expensive and not yet known about their 2FA status, can't find any info anywhere on it)
Since Gemini Active Trader and Kraken are currently out of the running because of those issues stated, Coinbase Pro seems to be the best case at the moment. Maybe with Cash app as a supplement for quick buys and withdrawals.
I also looked at Swan and it's ok, more info in the comments, but biggest thing is it doesn't support modern bt1 addresses.

Updated: Added ACH options

Update2: Found this great resource on what kind of 2FA various exchanges use:
https://twofactorauth.org/#cryptocurrencies

Update3: Added support response from Gemini support regarding 2FA and ActiveTrader on mobile
submitted by SatoshiThreepwoodMP to BitcoinBeginners [link] [comments]

Mentor Monday, May 06, 2019: Ask all your bitcoin questions!

Ask (and answer!) away! Here are the general rules:
And don't forget to check out /BitcoinBeginners
You can sort by new to see the latest questions that may not be answered yet.
submitted by rBitcoinMod to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Bull Bitcoin’s Dollar-Cost Averaging tool for Canadians: a detailed overview

Hello fellow Canadian Bitcoiners!
I'm Francis Pouliot, CEO and founder of Bull Bitcoin (previously known as Bitcoin Outlet) and Bylls.
I haven't been active on Reddit for a while but I thought I'd pop back here to let the community know about our new dollar-cost averaging feature, "Recurring Buy"
This post is a copy of my most recent medium article which you can read here if you want to see the screenshots. https://medium.com/bull-bitcoin/bull-bitcoins-dollar-cost-averaging-tool-for-canadians-the-right-time-to-buy-bitcoin-is-every-day-82a992ca22c1
Thanks in advance for any feedback and suggestions!
[Post starts here]
The Bull Bitcoin team is constantly trying to reduce the frictions ordinary people face when investing in Bitcoin and propose innovative features which ensure our users follow Bitcoin best practices and minimize their risks.
We are particularly excited and proud about our latest feature: an automated Bitcoin dollar-cost averaging tool which we dubbed “Recurring Buy”.
The Recurring Buy feature lets Bull Bitcoin users create an automated schedule that will buy Bitcoin every day using the funds in their account balance and send the Bitcoin directly to their Bitcoin wallet straight away.
We put a lot of thought in the implementation details and striking the right trade-offs for a simple and elegant solution. Our hope is that it will become a standard other Bitcoin exchanges will emulate for the benefit of their users. This standard will certainly evolve over time as we accumulate feedback and operational experience.
In this article, I cover:
The problem that we are trying to solve
Recurring Buy feature details, processes and instructions
The rationale (and tradeoffs) behind the main feature design choices
Bull Bitcoin is only available to Canadians, but non-Canadians that wish to have a look at how it works are welcome to make a Bull Bitcoin account and check out how it works here. You will be able to go through the process of create the schedule for testing purposes, but you wont be able to fund your account and actually purchase Bitcoin.
What problems does Dollar-Cost Averaging solve?
The most common concern of Bitcoin investors is, not surprisingly, “when is the right time to buy Bitcoin?”. Bitcoin is indeed a very volatile asset. A quick glance at a Bitcoin price chart shows there are without a doubt “worse times” and “better times” to invest in Bitcoin. But is that the same as the “right” time?
Gurus, analysts and journalists continuously offer their theories explaining what affects the Bitcoin price, supported by fancy trading charts and geopolitical analysis, further reinforcing the false notion that it is possible to predict the price of Bitcoin.
Newbies are constantly bombarded with mainstream media headlines of spectacular gains and devastating losses. For some, this grows into an irresistible temptation to get rich quick. Others become crippled with the fear of becoming “the sucker” on which early adopters dump their bags.
Veterans are haunted by past Bitcoin purchases which were quickly followed by a crash in the price. “I should have waited to buy the dip…”
Many Bitcoin veterans and long-term investors often shrug off the question of when is the right time to buy with the philosophy: “just hodl”. But even those holding until their death will recognize that buying more Bitcoin for the same price is a better outcome.
Given the very high daily volatility of Bitcoin, a hodler can find himself in many years having significantly less wealth just because he once bought Bitcoin on a Monday instead of a Wednesday. His options are either to leave it up to chance or make an attempt to “time the market” and “buy the dip”, which can turn into a stressful trading obsession, irrational decisions (which have a negative impact on budget, income and expenses) and severe psychological trauma. In addition, trying to “buy the dip” is often synonymous to keeping large amounts of fiat on an exchange to be ready for “when the time comes”.
There must be a better way.
Bitcoin investors should be rewarded for having understood Bitcoin’s long-term value proposition early on, for having taken the risk to invest accordingly and for having followed best practices. Not for being lucky.
Overview of features and rules
In this section I go into every detail of the Recurring Buy feature. In the following section, I focus on explaining why we chose this particular user experience.
The user first decides his target investment amount. Ideally, this is a monthly budget or yearly budget he allocates to investing in Bitcoin based on his projected income and expenses.
The user then chooses either the duration of the Recurring Buy schedule or the daily purchase amount. The longer the better.
The frequency is each day and cannot be modified.
The user must submit a Bitcoin address before activating a Recurring Buy schedule. By default, every transaction will be sent to that Bitcoin address. It’s the fallback address in case they don’t provide multiple addresses later.
Once the user has filled the form with target amount, the duration and the Bitcoin address, he can activate the Recurring Buy Schedule.
The user is not required to already have funds in his account balance to activate the schedule.
We will randomly select a time of day at which his transaction will be processed (every hour, so 24 possible times). If the user insists on another time of day, he can cancel his Recurring Buy schedule and try again.


The Recurring Buy feature as displayed on bullbitcoin.com/recurring-buys
The schedule is then displayed to the user, showing the time and date at which transactions that will take place in the future. The user will be able to see how long his current balance will last.
He can follow the progress of the dollar-cost averaging schedule, monitor in real time his average acquisition cost, and audit each transaction individually.
At this point, the user can and should change the Bitcoin address of his next transactions to avoid address re-use. Address re-use is not forbidden, but it is highly discouraged.
After having modified the Bitcoin addresses, there is nothing left for the user to do except watch the bitcoins appear in his Bitcoin wallet every day!
The Bitcoins are sent right away at the time of purchase.
Bitcoin transactions using the Recurring Buy feature will have the lowest possible Bitcoin network transaction fee to avoid creating upwards pressure on the fee market impact other network users.


What users see after first activating a schedule
The Recurring Buy schedule will be cancelled automatically at the time of the next purchase if the balance is insufficient. He can add more funds to his balance whenever he wants.
The Recurring Buy schedule will continue until the target amount is reached or until the account balance runs out.
The user can cancel his Recurring Buy schedule whenever he wants.
If the user wants to change the amount or duration of the schedule, he can simply cancel his current schedule and create a new one.
Each schedule has a unique identifier so that users can keep track of various schedules they perform over time.
Once a schedule is completed, either fully or partially, a summary will be provided which shows the number of transactions completed, the average acquisition cost, the total amount of Bitcoin purchase and the total amount of fiat spent. Useful for accounting!


A partially completed Recurring Buy schedule cancelled after 9 days due to insufficient funds
Though process in making our design choices
Recurring Bitcoin Purchases vs. Recurring Payment/Funding
The first and most important design choice was to separate the processes of funding the account balance with fiat (the payment) from the process of buying Bitcoin (the purchase). Users do not need to make a bank transaction every time they do a Bitcoin purchase. They first fund their account manually on their own terms, and the recurring purchases are debited from their pre-funded account balance.
Another approach would have been to automatically withdraw fiat from the user’s bank account (e.g. a direct debit or subscription billing) for each transaction (like our friends at Amber) or to instruct the user to set-up recurring payments to Bull Bitcoin from their bank account (like our friends at Bittr). The downside of these strategies is that they require numerous bank transactions which increases transaction fees and the likelihood of triggering fraud and compliance flags at the user’s bank. However, this does remove the user’s need to keep larger amounts of fiat on the exchange and reduces the friction of having to make manual bank payments.
Bull Bitcoin is currently working on a separate “Recurring Funding” feature that will automatically debit fiat from the user’s bank accounts using a separate recurring schedule with a minimum frequency of once a week, with a target of once every two weeks or once a month to match the user’s income frequency. This can, and will, be used in combination from the “Recurring Buy” feature, but both can be used separately.
The ultimate experience that we wish to achieve is that users will automatically set aside, each paycheck (two weeks), a small budget to invest in Bitcoin using the “Recurring Funding” feature which is sufficient to refill their account balance for the next two weeks of daily recurring purchases.
Frequency of transactions
The second important decision was about customizing the frequency of the schedule. We decided to make it “each day” only. This is specifically to ensure users have a large enough sample size and remain consistent which are the two key components to a successful dollar-cost averaging strategy.
A higher amount of recurring transactions (larger sample size) will result in the user’s average acquisition being closer to the actual average Bitcoin price over that period of time. Weekly or monthly recurring purchases can provide the same effectiveness if they are performed over a duration of time which is 7x longer (weekly) or 30x longer (monthly).
It is our belief that the longer the duration of the schedule, the more likely the user is to cancel the recurring buy schedule in order to “buy the dip”. Dollar-cost averaging is boring, and watching sats appear in the wallet every day is a good way to reduce the temptation of breaking the consistency.
We do not force this on users: they can still cancel the schedule if they want and go all-in. We consider it more of a gentle nudge in the right direction.
Frequency of withdrawals (one purchase = one bitcoin transaction)
This is one of the most interesting design choices because it is a trade-off between scalability (costs), privacy and custody. Ultimately, we decided that trust-minimization (no custody) and privacy were the most important at the expense of long-term scalability and costs.
Realistically, Bitcoin network fees are currently low and we expect them to remain low for the near future, although they will certainly increase massively over the long-term. One of the ways we mitigated this problem was to select the smallest possible transaction fee for transactions done in the context of Recurring Buy, separate from regular transaction fees on regular Bitcoin purchases (which, at Bull Bitcoin, are very generous).
Note: users must merge their UTXOs periodically to avoid being stuck with a large amount of small UTXOs in the future when fees become more expensive. This is what makes me most uncomfortable about our solution. I hope to also solve this problem, but it is ultimately something Bitcoin wallets need to address as well. Perhaps an automated tool in Bitcoin wallets which merges UTXOs periodically when the fees are low? Food for thought.
When transaction fees and scalability becomes a problem for us, it will have become a problem for all other small payments on the Bitcoin network, and we will use whatever solution is most appropriate at that time.
It is possible that Lightning Network ends up being the scalability solution, although currently it is logistically very difficult to perform automated payouts to users using Lightning, particularly recurring payouts, which require users to create Bolt11 invoices and to convince other peers in the network to open channels and fund channels with them for inbound capacity.
These are the general trade-offs:
Send a Bitcoin transaction for every purchase (what we do) - Most expensive for the exchange - Most expensive for the user (many UTXOs) - Increases Bitcoin Network UTXOs set - Inefficient usage of block space - Most private - Zero custody risk
Keep custody of the Bitcoin until the schedule is over or when the user requests a withdrawal (what Coinbase does) - No additional costs -No blockchain bloating - Same level of privacy - High custody risk
Batch user transactions together at fixed intervals (e.g. every day) - Slightly lower transaction costs for the exchange - Same costs for the user - Slightly more efficient use of block space - Same level of UTXO set bloating - Much lower level of privacy - Slightly higher custody risk
Single address vs multiple addresses vs HD keys (xpubs)
The final decision we had to make was preventing address re-use and allowing users to provide an HD key (xpub) rather than a Bitcoin address.
Address re-use generally decreases privacy because it becomes possible for third-party blockchain snoops to figure out that multiple Bitcoin transactions are going to the same user. But we must also consider that even transactions are sent to multiple addresses, particularly if they are small amounts, it is highly likely that the user will “merge” the coins into a single transaction when spending from his wallet. It is always possible for users to prevent this using Coinjoin, in which there is a large privacy gain in not re-using addresses compared to using a single address.
It is important to note that this does not decrease privacy compared to regular Bitcoin purchases on Bull Bitcoin outside of “Recurring Buy”. Whether a user has one transaction of $1000 going to a Bitcoin address or 10x$100 going that same Bitcoin address doesn’t reveal any new information about the user other than the fact he is likely using a dollar-cost averaging mechanism. It is rather a missed opportunity to gain more privacy.
Another smaller decision was whether or not we should ask the user to provide all his addresses upfront before being able to activate the schedule, which would completely remove the possibility of address re-use. We ultimately decided that because this process can take a very long time (imagine doing Recurring Buy every day for 365 days) it is better to let the user do this at his own pace, particularly because he may eventually change his Bitcoin wallet and forget to change the addresses in the schedule.
There are also various legitimate use-cases where users have no choice but to re-use the same address . A discussion for another day!
Asking the user to provide an XPUB is a great solution to address re-use. The exchange must dynamically derive a new Bitcoin address for the user at each transaction, which is not really a technical challenge. As far as I can tell, Bittr is the only Bitcoin exchange exchange which has implemented this technique. Kudos!
It is however important that the user doesn’t reuse this XPUB for anything else, otherwise the exchange can track his entire wallet balance and transaction history.
It is worth noting that not all wallets support HD keys or have HD keys by default (e.g. Bitcoin Core). So it is imperative that we offer the option to give Bitcoin addresses. We believe there is a lot of potential to create wallet coordination mechanisms between senders and recipients which would make this process a lot more streamlined.
In the future, we will certainly allow users to submit an XPUB instead of having to manually input a different address. But for now, we wanted to reduce the complexity to a minimum.
Conclusion: personal thoughts
I have a somewhat unique perspective on Bitcoin users due to the fact that I worked at the Bitcoin Embassy for almost 4 years. During this time, I had the opportunity to discuss face-to-face with thousands of Bitcoin investors. One of my favourite anecdotes is a nocoiner showing up at our office in December 2013 with a bag full of cash attempting to buy Bitcoin, “I know how to read a chart”, furious after being turned away. Many people who went “all-in” for short-term gains (usually altcoins) would show up to the Bitcoin Embassy office months later with heart-breaking stories.
This isn’t what I signed up for. My goal is to help people opt-out of fiat and, ultimately, to destroy the fiat currency system entirely.
This instilled in me a deep-rooted concern for gambling addiction and strong aversion to “trading”. I do not believe that Bitcoin exchanges should blindly follow “what the market dictates”. More often than not, what dictates the market is bad habits users formed because of the other Bitcoin services they used in the past, what other people are used to, and what feels familiar. Running a Bitcoin company should be inseparable from educating users on the best practices, and embedding these best practices into the user experience is the best way for them to learn.
Another important anecdote which motivated me to build a dollar-cost averaging tool is a person very close to me that had made the decision to buy Bitcoin, but was so stressed out about when was the right time to buy that they ended up not buying Bitcoin for a whole 6 months after funding their Bull Bitcoin account. That person eventually gave up and ultimately invested a large amount all at once. In hindsight, it turned out to be one of the worst possible times to invest in Bitcoin during that year.
Investing in Bitcoin can, and should be, a positive and rewarding experience.
Buying Bitcoin every day is the right strategy, but it is not necessarily lead to the best outcome.
The reality is that the best time to buy Bitcoin is at when market hits rock bottom (obviously). Sometimes, the upside from buying the dip can be much bigger than the risk (e.g. when the price dropped below $200 in 2015). But these are exceptions rather than the rule. And the cost of chasing dips is very high: stress, investing time and mental energy, and the very real psychological trauma which results from making bad trading decisions. Ultimately, it’s better to do the right thing than being lucky, but it’s not always a bad idea to cheat on your dollar-cost averaging from time to time if you can live with the costs and consequences.
Yours truly,
Francis
submitted by FrancisPouliot to BitcoinCA [link] [comments]

Microsoft To Use Human Body Activities To Mine Cryptos

Microsoft To Use Human Body Activities To Mine Cryptos

The Tech Giant Filed A Patent For An Entirely New Environment, Tied To Servers, Sensors, And Communication Network
One of Silicon Valley’s tech hegemons, Microsoft, filed a patent for developing a “Cryptocurrency system using data on body activity,” aimed at rewarding users for their interactions with various devices.
Тhe patent paper describes that the whole environment would be created around the cryptocurrency system and communication network, which Microsoft describes in details.
According to the tech giant, the cryptocurrency system would rely on Distributed Ledger Technology (DLT) “and would utilize the use of various communication channels, such as, and not limited to, computer networks, public and private wireless networks, mobile data networks, as well as any combination of these technologies.”
Microsoft proposes incorporating sensors for measuring user activity in order to validate transactions. The sensors may include brain wave monitoring (both MRI and EEG sensors), blood flow sensors, temperature sensors, radio frequencies sensors, as well as movement sensors.
The activities, which could be anything from watching ads, or using wearable sensors, will result in a reward for the user. When a user completes a task, the data gathered via the sensors would be used as a “proof-of-work” (PoW) mechanism to validate transactions and the data on the distributed ledger.
According to the patent paper, “the new approach would substitute the massive computation power that the traditional mining sector requires with a new PoW algorithm.”
Microsoft claims some of the wearables will be able to gather blood flow data, as well as pulse and blood pressure data. However, Microsoft also entered the field of “Subconscious mining,” using different types of brain wave activity as a proof-of-work.
Some of the newly proposed for patent sensors will interact with beta and gamma brain waves, which are associated with memory, logical thinking, and learning. When the brain uses the memory blocks, it emits distinct waves, which indicate whether the brain is recording or replaying bits of information.
However, alpha waves, which are associated with the subconscious processes in the human brain, are among Microsoft’s top priorities. Alpha brain waves occur when the brain is concentrated on completing a task, and remain as a background process.
Alpha waves allow users to validate transactions when they are focused on doing something else – working, sport activities, or combining eye, blood, and brain sensors while watching ads, for example.
Being one of the leading companies in both software advancements and hardware development, Microsoft is no stranger to cryptocurrencies. Recently Microsoft was announced as one of the prominent investors during a $300 million Series B funding by Bitcoin futures trading platform Bakkt.
However, the race to gain a leading edge amid global stock market crashes and the recent COVID-19 outbreak, other technology giants are also setting their eyes on the world of cryptocurrencies and patents.
Recently, IBM secured a patent for a so-called “self-aware token” – a token system, which would eliminate the hassles regarding validation ability, authentication, as well as transaction coordination within a given system.
Coinbase’s CEO Brian Armstrong also secured a patent, allowing BTC to be sent via e-mail to a wallet address without any fees.
Since the start of the patent frenzy in the crypto sector in the United States, the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (PTO) gave “green light” to 227 blockchain-related patents. The patents were filed from January 2014 to December 2019, data from the PTO shows.
submitted by Crypto_Browser to CryptoBrowser_EN [link] [comments]

Building Ergo: UTXO vs Account

Ergo takes the most secure and best-established features of Bitcoin and implements advanced new cryptographic features on its rock-solid foundations. This series explores the choices we have made in creating Ergo, with the first article unpacking the advantages of the UTXO model.
When you’re dealing with financial value, you cannot afford to take chances. Every architecture decision in a cryptocurrency platform has implications. While there are different ways to solve the same problem, some solutions are better tested and more reliable than others.
Like Bitcoin, Ergo uses the ‘UTXO’ (unspent transaction outputs) model, rather than the Account model used by platforms like Ethereum. There are a number of reasons why we have made this choice, but first it’s worth explaining a little about how the UTXO or ‘Box’ model works.
Most people think that the balance of an account is a simple number that is updated when you send or receive funds. This is the obvious way to approach the problem; after all, it is effectively how money works in the real world. Your bank account has a balance that is increased or decreased when different transfers are made in and out. This is how the ‘Account’ model operates: your balance on the blockchain is altered by transactions to and from the account.
How much dough? The UTXO model, pioneered by Bitcoin, is quite different. You can think of this a bit like a person holding a series of lumps of bread dough. Their balance is the sum of these lumps, or UTXOs. Lumps can be divided or combined, before they are sent to a new address, but you always know where they came from. For example:
Alice has 100g of bread dough (100 ERG). She breaks off a lump of 75g and gives it to Bob, keeping 25g of ‘change’ for herself. Charlie has 250g of dough. He breaks off 150g and gives it to Bob, keeping 100g of change for himself. Bob breaks 20g of dough off the 150g lump he received from Charlie, and combines the resulting 130g with the 75g he received from Alice. He gives the total of 205g to Dave, keeping the 20g change for himself. Dave now has 205g of bread dough, which used to belong to Charlie. Before Charlie owned it, 75g used to belong to Alice, while 130g used to belong to Bob.
In the UTXO model, ‘lumps’ of coins can be combined and divided, but unlike bread dough, they aren’t mixed together. You can follow the history of funds right back to the coinbase transaction in which those coins were first mined. That’s very different to the Account model, where the balance of each account is simply changed. (You can, of course, check the blockchain to make sure the Account says what it should, but that’s not intrinsically necessary like it is with the UTXO approach.)
Why UTXO? The UXTO model has several implications. For a start, each object is immutable – lumps of coins cannot be ‘edited’ like an Account balance is edited when a transaction is made. The balance is calculated from the transaction history, right back to the point those coins first came into existence.
That makes security much simpler, because either a UTXO exists in the form you are expecting, or it does not exist at all. With the account model, you need to carefully check that the account you’re dealing with is in the state it should be (and developers typically don’t do that properly). This also makes UTXOs more friendly for offchain protocols, like sidechains and the Lightning Network.
Accounts make it easier to store the ‘state’, but easy doesn’t always mean better. With Ergo’s extended UTXO model, state transitions are more explicit and so they are cleaner – there are no unwanted surprises. It might be a little bit more burdensome to deal with, but it’s a lot better and more straightforward in terms of security.
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Ergoplatform.org
submitted by kushti to ergoplatformorg [link] [comments]

I'm making a 20.000€ loan and I have security questions

First of all, I made throwaway and I'm using tor and VPN to make this post.

Story (can skip this part I will seperate it from questions)

At peak of 2017 I decided to quit college in Croatia to make for BTC, struggled to earn cash (2€ min wage) so I can move to Germany.
When I moved to Germany I worked for Croatians half a year only to get fucked (because I worked illegaly) I didn't get paid cuz boss also got fucked.. long story

I managed to learn German to get a regular factory job and I went to take a loan when it BTC 10k mid February. Idea was 10k euro loan but I managed to get as much as I could from banker which is 20k, 250€ per month for 7 yrs
I was supposed to get it at 9.5k and buy BTC instantly but I got VERY LUCKY because their boss got sick so it dragged on a little so at the end he told me I'm getting it next week.

So instead of 2.2 btcs I'll get about 3.5 or maybe 4 almost. Depends what price will be till thursday. I can't be happier!! If it goes back up to 10k I could get a job and survive with family until next halvening without having to work.


So I got that going for me which is nice. Also, yes I know I AM investing what I can afford to lose, I'd rather risk it and be 3 day per month slave worker for 7 years than whole life.


Questions.

I have 0.1 btc now and I put it on trezor, then I took another trezor and put seed from first one in it so I can give it to family members.
What I realized is that when you write words in random order, hacker could still know your words just not in right order because you are writing them.
If my math is right there are 24^24 combinations which is alot but still is it possible to guess with program that tries combinations?


How safe is trezor if nobody has access to it, I know there is risk if someone other gets their hands on it, but is there possibility that I could get messed up.

Having btcs on address from which btcs haven't been moved out of is quantum resistant?

Should I distribute bitcoins 10-20% each on every trezor and maybe half of them on ledger oand other wallets?

Is it true that I can access my trezor bitcoins thru python programming software+internet if website is down?

I'm planning to buy BTC through coinbase because I did 10+ purchases thru there, other than 0.5% fee is there other reason I should avoid it?

What ways are there to buy BTC where absolutely nobody will know that I have bought it. I prefer bank not knowing about my purchases because who knows what would happend if BTC becomes king, banks fail and they/parasites now know that I have BTC

I think there are still some questions I don't remember..

Also, biggest mistake I have made is telling everyone about bitcoin, I started telling people, when they ask me about it, that I sold and bought TSLA or gambled it all on mex. I really should make all my lies same because I forget who I told what.
submitted by fukinpeasant13 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Building Ergo: UTXO vs Account

Ergo takes the most secure and best-established features of Bitcoin and implements advanced new cryptographic features on its rock-solid foundations. This series explores the choices we have made in creating Ergo, with the first article unpacking the advantages of the UTXO model.
When you’re dealing with financial value, you cannot afford to take chances. Every architecture decision in a cryptocurrency platform has implications. While there are different ways to solve the same problem, some solutions are better tested and more reliable than others.
Like Bitcoin, Ergo uses the ‘UTXO’ (unspent transaction outputs) model, rather than the Account model used by platforms like Ethereum. There are a number of reasons why we have made this choice, but first it’s worth explaining a little about how the UTXO or ‘Box’ model works.
Most people think that the balance of an account is a simple number that is updated when you send or receive funds. This is the obvious way to approach the problem; after all, it is effectively how money works in the real world. Your bank account has a balance that is increased or decreased when different transfers are made in and out. This is how the ‘Account’ model operates: your balance on the blockchain is altered by transactions to and from the account.

How much dough?

The UTXO model, pioneered by Bitcoin, is quite different. You can think of this a bit like a person holding a series of lumps of bread dough. Their balance is the sum of these lumps, or UTXOs. Lumps can be divided or combined, before they are sent to a new address, but you always know where they came from. For example:
Alice has 100g of bread dough (100 ERG). She breaks off a lump of 75g and gives it to Bob, keeping 25g of ‘change’ for herself. Charlie has 250g of dough. He breaks off 150g and gives it to Bob, keeping 100g of change for himself. Bob breaks 20g of dough off the 150g lump he received from Charlie, and combines the resulting 130g with the 75g he received from Alice. He gives the total of 205g to Dave, keeping the 20g change for himself. Dave now has 205g of bread dough, which used to belong to Charlie. Before Charlie owned it, 75g used to belong to Alice, while 130g used to belong to Bob.
In the UTXO model, ‘lumps’ of coins can be combined and divided, but unlike bread dough, they aren’t mixed together. You can follow the history of funds right back to the coinbase transaction in which those coins were first mined. That’s very different to the Account model, where the balance of each account is simply changed. (You can, of course, check the blockchain to make sure the Account says what it should, but that’s not intrinsically necessary like it is with the UTXO approach.)

Why UTXO?

The UXTO model has several implications. For a start, each object is immutable – lumps of coins cannot be ‘edited’ like an Account balance is edited when a transaction is made. The balance is calculated from the transaction history, right back to the point those coins first came into existence.
That makes security much simpler, because either a UTXO exists in the form you are expecting, or it does not exist at all. With the account model, you need to carefully check that the account you’re dealing with is in the state it should be (and developers typically don’t do that properly). This also makes UTXOs more friendly for offchain protocols, like sidechains and the Lightning Network.
Accounts make it easier to store the ‘state’, but easy doesn’t always mean better. With Ergo’s extended UTXO model, state transitions are more explicit and so they are cleaner – there are no unwanted surprises. It might be a little bit more burdensome to deal with, but it’s a lot better and more straightforward in terms of security.
submitted by eleanorcwhite to CryptoCurrencies [link] [comments]

Building Ergo: UTXO vs Account

Ergo takes the most secure and best-established features of Bitcoin and implements advanced new cryptographic features on its rock-solid foundations. This series explores the choices we have made in creating Ergo, with the first article unpacking the advantages of the UTXO model.
When you’re dealing with financial value, you cannot afford to take chances. Every architecture decision in a cryptocurrency platform has implications. While there are different ways to solve the same problem, some solutions are better tested and more reliable than others.
Like Bitcoin, Ergo uses the ‘UTXO’ (unspent transaction outputs) model, rather than the Account model used by platforms like Ethereum. There are a number of reasons why we have made this choice, but first it’s worth explaining a little about how the UTXO or ‘Box’ model works.
Most people think that the balance of an account is a simple number that is updated when you send or receive funds. This is the obvious way to approach the problem; after all, it is effectively how money works in the real world. Your bank account has a balance that is increased or decreased when different transfers are made in and out. This is how the ‘Account’ model operates: your balance on the blockchain is altered by transactions to and from the account.
How much dough?
The UTXO model, pioneered by Bitcoin, is quite different. You can think of this a bit like a person holding a series of lumps of bread dough. Their balance is the sum of these lumps, or UTXOs. Lumps can be divided or combined, before they are sent to a new address, but you always know where they came from. For example:
Alice has 100g of bread dough (100 ERG). She breaks off a lump of 75g and gives it to Bob, keeping 25g of ‘change’ for herself. Charlie has 250g of dough. He breaks off 150g and gives it to Bob, keeping 100g of change for himself. Bob breaks 20g of dough off the 150g lump he received from Charlie, and combines the resulting 130g with the 75g he received from Alice. He gives the total of 205g to Dave, keeping the 20g change for himself. Dave now has 205g of bread dough, which used to belong to Charlie. Before Charlie owned it, 75g used to belong to Alice, while 130g used to belong to Bob.
In the UTXO model, ‘lumps’ of coins can be combined and divided, but unlike bread dough, they aren’t mixed together. You can follow the history of funds right back to the coinbase transaction in which those coins were first mined. That’s very different to the Account model, where the balance of each account is simply changed. (You can, of course, check the blockchain to make sure the Account says what it should, but that’s not intrinsically necessary like it is with the UTXO approach.)
Why UTXO?
The UXTO model has several implications. For a start, each object is immutable – lumps of coins cannot be ‘edited’ like an Account balance is edited when a transaction is made. The balance is calculated from the transaction history, right back to the point those coins first came into existence.
That makes security much simpler, because either a UTXO exists in the form you are expecting, or it does not exist at all. With the account model, you need to carefully check that the account you’re dealing with is in the state it should be (and developers typically don’t do that properly). This also makes UTXOs more friendly for offchain protocols, like sidechains and the Lightning Network.
Accounts make it easier to store the ‘state’, but easy doesn’t always mean better. With Ergo’s extended UTXO model, state transitions are more explicit and so they are cleaner – there are no unwanted surprises. It might be a little bit more burdensome to deal with, but it’s a lot better and more straightforward in terms of security.
submitted by eleanorcwhite to btc [link] [comments]

I'm making minimum $100 per month...doing NOTHING. Tips on gaining a LOT more referrals! Plus, tips for other apps and sites to earn an extra $100-300. Info inside!

Hi all!
So as the title states, here's how to get yourself around $100-500 per month (i'm from the UK, but will use USD for reference!) just for installing a few apps and leaving them running, plus with referrals, you can earn a LOT more. It's what I like to call 'the passive trio'.
I'm getting around $100-200 from the (completely) passive apps, plus an additional $200-300 from the sites below. All legit, no scammy bulls*** here. These apps can be used worldwide.
Happy to provide more info in DM's if you need it!
The Passive Trio
https://www.pennygen.com/pro/passivex
All info can be found on the above link, but here's a quick rundown:
Honeygain (desktop/laptop/android/IOS)
Quick, easy signup process. Excellent customer support. 3 devices per IP. More IP's, more devices, more referrals = higher earning $5 on signing up to start you off, minimum $20 cashout. I reached my cashout in 2 weeks. PayPal only, and be sure to add the same email address as your PayPal account when signing up! My first cashout arrived in 3 days. I have this on my (very basic) laptop and 2 phones, keep them on 24/7 to earn more!
FluidStack (desktop/laptop only)
Download, install the node, choose your settings, enable upnp on your router (this is very easy to do), leave it running and earn. Simple as that. Maximum $50 payout per month (I made this in my first month, and have another $50 on the way!) Ok, so the beauty of FluidStack is in the referrals... $5 per referral! If you have a balance over $50 (which you will, using the referral service as I will explain shortly), this will simply roll over to the following month. Even if the node doesn't work for you, you still receive the referral money. It gets paid out on the last day of every month, again to PayPal.
CryptoTab Browser (desktop/laptop/android/ios)
This thing is great, and has the best referral system i've ever seen. Check it out on their site.It's similar to Brave Browser (this is also great!). Install, turn on the Bitcoin mining feature and earn. With their referral system, you can do VERY well. For those unaware of how to convert Bitcoin to cash and deposit to your bank account, i'd recommend Coinbase. Super easy to signup and use, and pay to your bank account very rapidly.
Coinbase referral: https://www.coinbase.com/join/stacey_2
non-ref: www.coinbase.com
For those who want a decent amount of quick and easy cash - take full advantage of Coinbase Earn offers.
non-ref: https://www.coinbase.com/earn
For anyone needing a referral for EOS, feel free to use mine, still got 4 spaces left: https://coinbase.com/earn/eos/invite/ysrkq54z
So, a lot of the extra cash with the above passive earning apps is coming in from referrals via PennyGen https://www.pennygen.com/pro/passivex
I was recommended this by someone on Reddit. Can confirm that it is completely legit, i'd highly recommend having a chat with the guy who runs it (Cuzco) if you want any additional info, or if you just want reassurance, but in summary -
PennyGen offers a 'Boost' feature, at a cost of $8. This gives you 10,000 views within a 24 hour cycle, and got me a ton of referrals for the above apps. There is also a 'Daily Drive' feature. This will give you 500 views on your referral links per day, for 30 days, and costs $10. Both of these combined have got me a LOT of referrals, therefore, extra cash. In addition to this, there are membership features which I would HIGHLY recommend. Have a a browse through the site, go to live chat and contact Cuzco if you want to know more. I'm convinced he is a wizard. You can Boost/Drive pretty much anything. Your Youtube channel, your website, blog - whatever. I've gained back what I paid for Boosts/Drives rapidly, so that hasn't been an issue.
Ok, so that's the passive trio out of the way!
Here's how i'm getting the rest of the cash:
#1 for me has got to be Swagbucks. This is an excellent source of extra income, beer money, whatever you wanna call it!
Just with surveys alone, i'm getting around $50-100 month. Top up your Swagbucks (SB) by signing up to Hideout.tv (you can find that in https://www.pennygen.com/pro/passivex) and just leave it running on your devices overnight.
Plenty of ways to earn those delicious Swagbucks, I imagine most here have accounts on it already but if not, sign up!
non-ref: www.swagbucks.com
IMPORTANT NOTE: DO NOT USE PENNYGEN FOR BOOSTS OR DAILY DRIVES ON SWAGBUCKS! This got me temporarily banned (I didn't read their terms and conditions correctly) and was very lucky they gave me my account back!
Others listed on https://www.pennygen.com/pro/passivex :
hideout.tv - great way to get extra swagbucks
Qmee - I love this survey site/app, I was amazed at how quick they pay out to PayPal. Well paying surveys, and a very generous referral system. Also, no minimum payout.
Others not listed:
Gener8: This is just a button you install on your browser. Every time you open a tab, you earn pointswhich can be redeemed for many different things (I choose Amazon vouchers personally). Install this alongside CryptoTab Browser or Brave Browser, and you have a winner.
ref: https://refer.gener8ads.com/uk6mv9
non-ref: www.gener8ads.com
OhMyDosh - another great survey site, easy source of extra cash.
Non-ref: www.ohmydosh.co.uk
Ref: https://ohmydosh.co.uk/validate/refer_a_friend/welcome/501958?keyword=referred
Here's a bunch of other great survey sites/apps:
Panelist Portal
MobRog
20Cogs - £10 signup offer with these
Maximiles
Branded Surveys
PopulusLive
LifePoints
So, to summarise - with the passive trio + pennygen boosts/drives/membership + referrals = $100-200 average per month The rest - It really comes down to how much time you're willing to spend on survey sites. If you commute to work as I do (1 hour each way), or you just generally have any free time - the more you will earn. I'd say on an average day I spend about 2 hours on survey sites, but put in more hours on days off/when i'm free. It's all down to you really.
Anyhow, this all took a little longer to type up than i'd anticipated, but I hope you all earn some decent cash out of this. Post your referrals in the comments if you wish, or use https://www.pennygen.com/pro/passivex
if you really want to max your referrals. Good luck all! Any questions, please feel free to inbox me!
Cheers!
Bonus mention! Trading212:
This one is great, although I still have 20 referrals left! You simply sign up, deposit the minimum (£1 here in the UK), and receive a bonus share of up to £100, which can be cashed out directly to your card/bank account after around 30 days. I signed up to this using someone elses referral, and received a share worth £22. Was very happy with that. Well, technically £23 which included the £1 I deposited.
Please note, you get 20 referrals max, so once used (if you get lucky!), please delete your ref link. Can be used on desktop/laptop/phone app.
Ref: www.trading212.com/invite/FMA6sUkc
Non-ref: www.trading212.com
submitted by dragonballsteve85 to making_money_online [link] [comments]

The importance of good labels

Wasabi is not like most of other bitcoin wallets, it is a privacy oriented wallet and every feature and every design decision is based mainly (sometimes exclusively) on privacy cost/benefits analysis. For that reason many features depend on each other and a correct understanding of how they play together is critical to achieve and improve the privacy of our transactions.
Coin control
Coin control is a key feature that enables all the rest of features. How could we coinjoin our coins if we weren't able to select those coins we want to participate with? How could we know which coins are being spend in a transaction without a coin control? How could we decide what to reveal to a kyc exchange without this feature? Well, it is not possible.
Personally I consider Wasabi a coins-oriented wallet in the sense that coins are the most important unit of information information to take decisions about privacy.

Labels
As a privacy-oriented solution the focus is always on minimizing how much we reveal about our financial activity to others. For that reason when we create a new address to receive bitcoins, we are forced to label that coin! And what kind of information do we have to provide here? The label has to tell us who is/are the one/s that know about that coin.
For example, if I create a new address to receive a 0.5btc payment from Andrew for an old laptop that I sold to him then the label has to be: Andrew.
Most of other wallets out there don't care much about privacy (or at least no so much as Wasabi does) and for that reason the don't allow us to attach this critical data to our coins. Instead, they provide a way to add a description to the transactions, in those wallets it is expected to add something like "Payment from Andrew for my old laptop" so, if tomorrow I see that amount i can know what is the reason. Wasabi does not have this and it is something that doesn't provide any extra privacy.
Understanding this difference between labeling a coin (Wasabi) and describing a transaction (Many other wallets) is critical important for your privacy and I will try to explain why below.

Clusters
Following with the previous example, if I have to send a fraction (0.1btc) of the coin received in exchange for my laptop to a Charlie (a guy who usually I sell bitcoins to for dollars) then that transaction label has to be: Charlie. In that way, the change (0.3999xxxbtc) will be known by Andrew and Charlie because they both will be able to follow the change. That's exactly what Wasabi displays in the coins list (cluster column), Wasabi tells us who are the ones that know about each of our coins in order to allow us to decide what to do with our coins.
I am sure you already understood the concept but let me give another example. Imagine you have other coins, let say one known by Alice, other known by Coinbase and finally one know by Charlie. Imagine you need to sell a few sats to Charlie, which coin/s should you send? The obvious election is the one already known by Charlie because doing that he cannot learn anything new about our wallet, moreover, nobody can learn anything new! But what if the coin is not big enough and we need to use more than one coin? You can use the one known by Alice or the one known by Coinbase but, are you okay with Charlie knowing about your deposit (or withdrawal) from the exchange? Are you okay with Alice knowing about your deal with Charlie? In case none of those combinations are acceptable for you then you should coinjoin your coins.

CoinJoined coins
Those that participate in a Wasabi coinjoin transaction receive at least one coin with a anonymity set level that depends on the number of participants in that transaction. By default Wasabi tries to create transactions with 100 unknown participants so, the received coin can have 100 anonymity set what means that it is really hard for an observer to know who that coin belong to. For that reason a coin with high anonymity set loses the cluster original cluster which it belonged.

Automatic selection
As we can see now the correct labeling of coins allows Wasabi to display useful information about who know about our wallet and how much they know. It also allow Wasabi to select coins for you if you want (not recommended). Basically, if you select all your coins Wasabi will select those that minimize the number of people that will learn more about your wallet.
It is also possible to implement (there is a draft PR for this) a selection strategy that chooses the coins based on the receiver knowledge of our coins by sending him/her those that are already known by him/her, etc.
Final words and Examples
4 coins with good labels:
2 coins with bad labels:
In case we take the two first coins with good labels and send that to María, look how the change cluster will be displayed: Maria, Andrew, David, Me (this people knows about the coin). Now, look how this will be displayed if I use the two coins with bad labels: Maria, Payment from Andrew for my old laptop, From my old wallet (what the heck is this telling me!???)
So, think in coins, think in who knows and think that you have to take decisions about privacy based on what you are going to reveal to whom. Wasabi doesn't care about why you transact with bitcoins, it only cares about who you transact with because it need to take care of your privacy.
submitted by lontivero to WasabiWallet [link] [comments]

Summary of the new IRS guidance

Link: https://bitcoin.tax/blog/irs-crypto-tax-faq/
The IRS has issued their long-awaited guidance on the tax treatment for cryptocurrencies. You can read their FAQ On Virtual Currency Transactions on the IRS website.
This is the first official guidance since the original 2014-21 notice in April 2014.

tl:dr;


Generally, this is the same as the advice and common practice used by taxpayers and accountants. Although, the exception here is the clarification of the specific identification rule. We'll talk about that below.

IRS Cryptocurrency Tax FAQ

We have gone into more detail for some of the main points in their FAQ.

Hard forks and airdrops

Despite peculiar wording by the IRS, they have confirmed that receipt of crypto from an airdrop or fork is to be treated as income, and so subject to income tax.
ordinary income equal to the fair market value of the new cryptocurrency when it is received, which is when the transaction is recorded on the distributed ledger, provided you have dominion and control over the cryptocurrency so that you can transfer, sell, exchange, or otherwise dispose of the cryptocurrency
However, these drops typically have no market (perhaps a futures market) until they have existed for a period of time, so establishing a value could be difficult. It is possible that the value could be zero right at that exact moment it is recorded on the distributed ledger.
In order to receive income, you must have dominion and control over these new crypto. This effectively means you must be able to manage it; typically you would have the private keys or it is immediately available in a custodial wallet or online account, e.g. Coinbase.
If the crypto doesn't appear in your wallet, or you don't get control of it until a later date, then that later date is used to calculated the USD income value.
This had been a common question among crypto traders: if BTC was forked off into a new "BTC" coin, which you might not even have been aware of, do you still have income? The answer is no. Unless, you subsequently get access to those new coins, in which case you do have income on the date you receive control.
When you have income for an airdrop or fork, this also sets the cost basis (value and date) for any subsequent capital gains calculations.
Bitcoin.Tax already looks up any current value, if known, for forks or airdrop symbols when they are added to the Income tab, otherwise a zero basis is used.

Fair Market Value (FMV)

FMV is used to give something a value, i.e. what it's worth. If you list a bike for sale, you might research the prices for which other people are selling. Those prices give a FMV. But it you sell your bike and someone buys it for $100, then the bike's FMV was $100.
With crypto, sometimes we need to know FMV because we are not trading directly for dollars.
For example, if you sell 1 BTC for 150 LTC, you are disposing of the 1 BTC at FMV. You need to know the USD value in order to know the proceeds and to calculate any capital gains or losses.
So, first, if this was traded on an exchange, we use the spot price on the exchange at that time. This is true even if the transaction was off-chain.
However, where no FMV exists, such as a peer-to-peer transaction, then you have to get the value from elsewhere.
So, secondly, use the FMV of the service or product you are exchanging. With the above bike example, say buying it with crypto, the FMV would be that of the bike itself (the price it would have sold for USD).
Lastly, when no value can be obtained, then use a service that provides a consistent worldwide indices value (the IRS are calling this an "explorer" but that is a confusing term as blockchain explorers may not provide a USD value). If you do not use an "explorer" value, you can use an "accurate representation of the cryptocurrency's market value". Much like with fiat, this means using an establish and consistent source.
Bitcoin.Tax already uses the exchange price data wherever possible, but otherwise combines crypto pricing for multiple worldwide sources to calculate a FMV.

FIFO and Specific Identification

Advice from most tax preparers and accountants has been to err on the side of caution and go with First-In First-Out (FIFO). Basically, if you bought 1 BTC for $9,000 and later another for $10,000, when you come to sell 1 BTC (or partial) you would use the cost of the first 1 BTC that you had acquired.
This is the default IRS cost basis method and would not be challenged.
Some taxpayers had filed using specific identification, where FIFO was not used and instead the "lot" that was sold was chosen from their wallets. Summary strategies could also be employed, such as Last-In Last-Out (LIFO), where the basis of the most recently acquired crypto is used instead.
These other strategies, such as last-in first-out, closest-cost or lowest-cost, often try to minimize the gains per transaction and defer them until later.
This is the biggest change in the new IRS guidance and confirms that specific identification can be used. However, you must be able to document this, which the IRS describes as:
You may identify a specific unit of virtual currency either by documenting the specific unit’s unique digital identifier such as a private key, public key, and address, or by records showing the transaction information for all units of a specific virtual currency, such as Bitcoin, held in a single account, wallet, or address. This information must show (1) the date and time each unit was acquired, (2) your basis and the fair market value of each unit at the time it was acquired, (3) the date and time each unit was sold, exchanged, or otherwise disposed of, and (4) the fair market value of each unit when sold, exchanged, or disposed of, and the amount of money or the value of property received for each unit.
There is no guidance if any extra information should be reported, but it is generally the same information that is added to the 8949 form where capital gains are reported.
Bitcoin.Tax already provides automatic calculations using multiple specific identification strategies so you can choose your cost basis lots. Navigate to the Calculate tab and you can see the values for each crypto you have traded.

Gifts and Donations

Similar to gifts of stocks or property, the rules regarding cost basis have remained unchanged. Received gifts are not immediate income but you do still recognize an capital gains income when you later come to sell, exchange or dispose of the cryptocurrency.
You can use the original basis (with documentation) from the giver in order to make use of long-term gains. However, your received basis becomes the lesser of the giver's cost basis and the FMV of the gift on the date you received it. This is to prevent from gifting losses. Also, if you do not have documentation showing the gift cost basis, then your basis is zero, i.e. you must declare 100% as capital gains.
Donations to registered charities do not recognize income, gains or losses. The value of your charitable donation is the FMV on the date of the gift if you have held the crypto for more than a year. For a year or less, it is lesser of the crypto's cost basis or its FMV on the day of the gift.
Bitcoin.Tax reports already splits out the basis for any gifts or donations that you make, which can be given to the recipient to provide them with the information they will require.

What was not mentioned

There are still some key questions and ambiguities that tax professionals have been looking for clarification. For instance, with hard forks and airdrops, if you have the private keys but no software, does that count as control?
Airdrop and forks generally have no markets when they are created, so is there a zero FMV? And should you take the value only when you exercise control?
Can specific identification be used at will or must it be done consistently?
Were 1031 "like-kind" exchanges ever a valid approach before 2018?

Guidance is retroactive

Finally, be aware that IRS guidance is always retroactive, unless otherwise stated, and so should be applied to past and future crypto transactions. If you have not followed these rules then you should consult with your tax professional and may need to file an amendment.
submitted by Sal-BitcoinTax to bitcointaxes [link] [comments]

How I Got Paid By 65 Different Beermoney Programs in 2018 [Guide]

How I Got Paid By 65 Different Beermoney Programs in 2018

Hi! Welcome to my guide for everything that paid me in 2018. Before I begin, here are a few details:
Now, let’s get into the good stuff.

1. Quickthoughts - $590

This was my top earner for the year and it only took me up until September to earn this amount. I had to stop because they require a W9 for anything over $600 and I was too lazy to file that. It is pretty similar to a traditional survey router, but I seem to have much better luck with not disqualifying here. I get paid $1 per survey but some people earn $2 per survey based on their demographics. Some people have issues with bans and getting locked out of accounts, so it is not for everyone. Because of this, it is important to cash out the minute you hit the cashout minimum of $10. There are both android and iOS apps but I highly recommend using android if possible because the iOS app pays in iTunes gift cards and the android app pays in Amazon gift cards. Overall, Quickthoughts is great if you are one of the lucky ones without account issues.

2. CrowdTap - $270

This is one of my favorite beermoney programs of all time. You complete a variety of very short polls and questions about consumer goods, food products, and services. The polls pay 1.5 cents each and the short answer questions pay 10 cents each. There are other ways that they ask questions, including longer surveys that are a combination between the polls and questions. All of them are well worth it for the time that they take. Reward options include Amazon, Target, Walmart, Steam, Xbox, and more. You can cash out starting at $5 and I am able to cash out about once a week. Definitely add this one to your routine if you have not yet.

3. Prolific Academic - $197.95

This one is great. Take academic surveys for universities and researchers and get paid in cash. As long as you don’t miss attention checks you won’t get disqualified. Some people get multiple surveys a day and others get only a few a week based on demographics. Many pay at least minimum wage. I could have made a lot more on here if I tried. Universally regarded as one of the most “worth it” survey sites so give it a shot!

4. Pinecone Research - $138 + Ranch Dip and Dog Chews

Pinecone pays a guaranteed $3 for 10-15 min surveys regarding opinions on new products. They also send free samples sometimes! You can cash out for a variety of gift cards or PayPal. I get about 1 survey a week on average. Pinecone is invite only so look for invites to sign up on other GPT sites as sometimes you can find them there. If you get in it is some of the best money you can make with surveys for the time you spend on it.

5. Branded Surveys - $130

Branded Surveys has traditional router surveys. A major perk of using Branded used to be their generous daily login bonus. This has been reduced to 5 cents a day, so it might not be worth using this site for the login bonus alone anymore. They have a very high EngageMe rate at one cent per 3 videos if that’s your thing as well! Payouts start at $10 via Paypal and Amazon.

6. Nicequest - $120

Big fan of this one. Their surveys have guaranteed rewards even if you screen out and can pay up to $2-3 for like 10-15 minutes. Their currency is “shells” and each shell converts to about 7 cents. Installing their meter on your devices adds a guaranteed 5 shells per survey. If you add it to your computer, phone, and tablet you get an extra 15 shells (about a dollar) per survey. I just have it on my computer so I get 5 bonus shells. Cashouts are quick for e-gift cards and they also offer physical items. Saving up for larger gift cards typically gives you better rates.

7. PrizeRebel - $107

PrizeRebel is your typical GPT site with a variety of ways to earn, but it is most well-known for surveys. They pay $0.80 per survey on the YourSurvey router and that is where a majority of my earnings have come. Lots of cashout options starting at $2.

8. YouGov - $100

YouGov is a survey site/app that pays anywhere from $0.50 to $2 per survey. The best part of it is that you never disqualify. I get a couple surveys a week. Most of the surveys are about public policy, politics, or general opinions of companies. You get the best value for your points if you save up for the $100 cash out. They offer the $100 cash out in bank transfer and Amazon. The Amazon gift card option used to be a physical mailed card but now its an e-gift card so that makes it even better! They offer other gift cards but they are for smaller values at worse rates so I would avoid them. Available online, on android, and on iOS.

9. iMoney - $89

Get paid to download apps! The best thing about iMoney is that the apps always credit and you can get credit for apps you have downloaded before. That’s not the case on most paid-to-download apps. Earn 15-30 cents per app and there are 3-4 new apps available each day. They offer Amazon and PayPal but PayPal has a small fee. Added this towards the end of the year and hope to make more next year. Might not be in the app store at the moment? Couldn’t find a link to put in the title.

10. VeryDice - $65

Roll dice, get points, redeem for physical items and e-gift cards. I get the daily spin rolls every day and watch their ads for more rolls. The key to VeryDice is saving up approximately 100 rolls before rolling to have enough to get the daily doubles bonus of $0.30. Worth keeping on your phone even if it’s just for the daily spin rolls. Available on both iOS and Andoid. If you want to enter my ref code at sign up you’ll get 30 free rolls :). It is 1319422.

11. Forthright - $62

Sign up and receive invitations to surveys via email. Don’t do their “partner surveys”, they rarely credit and you can get stuck in an endless loop. Their non-partner surveys are awesome. They pay well for the time spent but they also have one of the best disqualification bonusses I have ever seen. Every three surveys you take, regardless of whether you disqualify or not, you get a $2 bonus. That is $0.66 per survey on top of its base pay regardless of whether you qualify or not. They pay instantly with PayPal, Amazon, or Bitcoin.

12. VolKno - $55

Do you like movies? Then this one’s for you. Watch, rate, and tag movie trailers to earn Amazon gift cards. Each trailer has three stages and after completing all three you will make 23.5 cents per trailer. One thing to keep in mind is that you need a physical verification card sent to a US address in order to activate your account. I completed basically every trailer that was posted over the year, so my earnings are a good estimate of what you can plan on earning.

13. Inbox Dollars - $52.03

A pretty shit GPT site with a high minimum cash out. Not sure how I ever hit the minimum cash out here. Would not recommend.

14. Zap Surveys (Ref for $0.75 bonus) - $52.03

There are three main ways to earn here: a 3 cent daily login bonus, 7 cent location rewards for opening the app when a notification appears, and surveys. If you’re going to do surveys on here do relatively short TapResearch ones. The location rewards alone are why I use this app. The one negative of this app is that the cash out minimum is $25. Definitely worth having on your phone!

15. PointClub - $50

This is a pretty normal survey site. They have a daily login streak bonus that can double the value of your surveys when you reach the max streak which can make a lot of them worth your time. I stopped receiving surveys, so I assume I’m banned? So be careful with this one. Cash out minimums are $25 which is higher than I would like.

16. Survey Monkey Rewards - $49.15

Another one of my favorites. Survey Monkey Rewards is a survey app created by Survey Monkey, a big name in survey development software. Surveys all take under 3-4 minutes and pay either 25 or 35 cents based on length. I almost never disqualify, and you can cash out instantly to Amazon starting at $5. Available on Android and iOS.

17. Earn.com - $71.31

Earn.com lets people pay Bitcoin to contact you. I mostly received BTC to sign up for ICOs and airdrops for random tokens. They were aquired by Coinbase so there are changes to the program. They require a LinkedIn to make an account now as well (I think). If you can get into the program still it is pretty great!

18. MyPoints - $45

This is a sister-site to Swagbucks. I have decent success with their surveys so I use it for that. They have some other ways to earn but I don’t use them. If you have the same success with their surveys it might be worth using.

19. MicroWorkers - $44.16

Basically a smaller and sketchier MTurk. Lots of short tasks with decent earning potential but you have to find the right type of tasks for you. I did the click, search tasks for a while. There is PayPal with a $9 minimum but if I remember right they mail you a physical card with a pin before you can cash out to verify your identity. Not for everyone but worth a look.

20. SurveysOnTheGo - $43.30

This one is pretty simple. Get surveys on your phone, and redeem for Amazon, Visa, PayPal, and Starbucks! Surveys range from $0.50-$10. Some are location based and involve in-store activities. The more involved the surveys are, the more they pay. Don’t expect a ton of surveys, but many of them are worth your time. Available on Android and iOS. Minimum cash out is $10.

21. Survey Junkie - $40

This survey site is average at best. I am having less success with them recently because I can’t be bothered to take a 20 minute survey for $0.90. The one benefit of this site is that they have a VERY small disqualification bonus. Some people do have success taking surveys on here and the cash out minimum is $10.

22. E-Poll - $35

Another survey provider with no disqualifications! Woohoo! You receive email notifications when you have a new survey. Surveys pay $0.50-$2 and are usually not too long. They pay via a points system and you get better rates if you save up for the higher rewards. I cash out for Amazon, and they can take a long time to deliver rewards so be patient.

23. MooCash - $33.60

MooCash pays you to download apps and then open them for 3 days once a day. I have gotten paid as much as $2 for a single app download. They don’t always credit super easily so I would only try the better paying ones. You can cash out for BTC, Amazon, PayPal, and more. You can use my ref code (EHNPNC) when you sign up for some free coins. I think it’s only available to the first 20 people.

24. InstaGC - $33

This is a pretty basic and easy to use GPT site. Very low cashout minimums with lots of options. Check out LiveSample and YourSurveys for a good place to start on surveys.

25. PaidViewpoint (Ref) - $32.65

Short surveys with minimum PayPal cashout of $15. There are short surveys to collect demographic information that pay 10 cents. If you qualify for any of the longer surveys they can pay as much as $1.50. Surveys can be sporadic so just check the site once a day. Worth the time it takes to put into it.

26. UserCrowd (UsabilityHub) - $32.40

UsabilityHub, now rebranded to UserCrowd, pays you to give feedback on websites and products. Each task pays anywhere from 10-50 cents and the minimum cash out is $10. UserCrowd is nice because unlike other usability testing sites you don’t need to record your voice or screen. I leave it in a pinned tab on Chrome and get notifications when there is a new task. They can vary in how often you get them. I enjoy this one, give it a shot.

27. OnePulse - $30

This app has very short surveys with guaranteed rewards. You never disqualify or anything like that. I get a notification that I have a new paid survey about once a week. Surveys pay 30 cents to start but as you “level up” they become worth slightly more. Right now mine are worth 34 cents. Cashout is at $5 via PayPal. Available on iOS and Android.

28. Watchback - $30

This is the best sweepstakes app I have used. You get entries into the sweepstakes by watching videos. Each video is an entry. I watch 10 videos a day and usually win either $0.50 or $1 each day. It pays via Perk points so it’s a nice supplement to your Perk routine. If this keeps being so easy to win I should make a lot more with it next year! Available on Android and iOS.

29. Dabbl - $30

I started using Dabbl towards the very end of the year. They offer short brand-sponsored polls and videos that pay anywhere from 5-20 cents. These are super infrequent and cashing out from these alone would take the better part of a year. Where I earn with Dabbl is their non-passive ads. You get paid 1 cent per ad so I run them when I’m doing other things. It adds up. They don’t offer Amazon so I cash out for Target. Cash outs are at $5. iOS and Android.

30. Gravy - $25

This is a pretty fun game show app. To summarize the game, you pick a percentage that you think a product will sell out at, and if you’re within the closest few people to the right percentage you win a decent little chunk of cash. I’ve won once. You can buy discounted products on here as well. Go check it out, it’s pretty addicting. My ref code is “Leeves” if you want to throw some bonus guesses my way :).

31. KinIt - $25

Take short polls and quizzes and get paid 6-25 cents a day. The unfortunate thing about KinIt is that they very rarely have their gift cards in stock. When they have them in stock they have a decent selection. Still worth your time in my opinion. iOS and Android are supported.

32. Life Fun and Everything - $25

This was an invite-only survey panel that gives me a $2 survey once a month. Found it on some GPT site.

33. Panel - $25

Install Panel on your phone and get paid for sharing your location data. They drastically reduced their pay rate recently so I’m not sure it’s worth it anymore. Previously you could expect to make about $25 a year.

34. Perksy (Ref) - $25

Short polls that pay anywhere from $0.50 to $1. I get about one a week. Only downside is that the minimum cash out is $25. Various gift cards (including Amazon) are available. Definitely worth keeping on your phone. I think it’s iOS only at this time.

35. Swagbucks - $25

One of the easiest GPT sites to use. Lots of offer walls and surveys. I don’t make a lot here but basically just do daily search, daily poll, Swago, and SwagIQ. If I wasn’t banned from their surveys for some reason I might make a little more. I use swagbucks from time to time to find easy offers to do. Overall, a decent place to start of you’re experimenting with beermoney for the first time.

36. Survey Mini- $25

This app uses your location data and pays you 10 cents (sometimes more) to fill out a short poll about stores and restaurants that you go to. They recently added e-gift cards instead of physical cards so that makes it a lot more attractive to use! iOS and Android.

37. IBotta - $20

This is one of the better apps that give you rebates on select grocery items as you shop in-store. If you buy a lot of groceries, there is money to be made here. They also have traditional online cashback portals and offers.

38. Streetbees - $19

This app has surveys with a more personal and fun spin. You get paid via PayPal for each task that you finish. There aren’t always tasks available but when there are, they often pay well. I had one for testing an app that paid $9! It’s a nice option for something a little different than traditional surveys.

39. AttaPoll - $15.29

Attapoll is a survey app that sends you more traditional router surveys (many of which are Cint surveys). You might disqualify quite a bit here depending on your demographic so I stick to the short ones. Payouts are via PayPal, Bitcoin, and Ethereum. PayPal starts at $3 (nice), ETH at $3.50, and BTC at an insane $100. On both Android and iOS.

40. Smores - $15

Smores is an Android lock screen app that pays a flat $0.10 a day for unlocking your device once. Their non-passive video section pays a cent per 2 videos at the moment so that can be a decent earner as well. Cash out as low as $1 for Amazon and other gift cards. I was pretty inconsistent in my daily unlocks this year and hope to increase my earnings next year.

41. Crowdology - $10.04

Very straight forward. Do surveys, get paid. Some people have success with this type of site, and others disqualify a lot. I would stick to any surveys under 10 minutes in length to avoid wasting your time. Cash out for Amazon or PayPal at $10.

42. Achievement - $10

This app pays you based on your steps. I have it connected to Apple Health. It took me about 9 months to earn $10 and I am pretty active. Android and iOS are both supported. Doesn’t run in the background or drain my battery from what I can tell so it’s very passive and harmless.

43. Gamermine (Ref code for $1 bonus) - $10

This is a GPT site with a few offer walls. They have good EngageMe rates as well as a 5 cent daily bonus as long as you’re making a dollar a week on offers on the site. This is basically the only truly passive income that I have made this year from running EngageMe.

44. Cross Media Panel - $10

This is a program through Google that paid you to let them have an extension on your browser and on your phone. They discontinued most of this program so I am no longer earning from them. Parts of this program still exist but I haven’t looked into it much. Probably just worth skipping over at this point.

45. Lifetap - $10

This app is just a garbage survey router now. It used to have some other short guaranteed-pay surveys. I wouldn’t mess with this anymore.

46. PayTime - $9.99

Paytime lets you earn money for your subscriptions by watching ads and answering a few questions about them. You can only cash out once a month because it is supposed to be used for monthly subscriptions. All they do is send you $9.99 via PayPal or Venmo once you watch 40 ads. The catch with PayTime is that you need to be a student at one of the universities that they support. Check their website for the list. Overall, if you are a student it could be an easy $10 a month. Hope to use this more next year.

47. Ready Games - $9.19

Get paid to play games! There is a new game every 48 hours and the top 20% of scores at the end of the time period get paid. The top player makes $7 and the payout decreases as you go down the ranks. I have won somewhere around $2.50 every game that I have made it into the top 20%. Pays via PayPal when you win. On Android and iOS. You can use share code “lucky-disk-68” if you want to give me some extra lives :).

48. Carepoynt - $7

This is a pretty bad healthy living/rewards site. I think they had a few easy ways to earn, like downloading their app, and that’s how I cashed out. There was a post about it so be looking for opportunities like these on the subreddit. I won’t be using this again.

49. Amazon Shipping History Task - $6

Look for tasks like this that get posted on the subreddit. Got paid to submit some shipping data from Amazon.

50. DailyWin - $6

This used to be a scratch card app with a non-passive video section but it seems to be dead. Move along, nothing to see here.

51. CitizenMe - $5.97

Take short polls. Get instantly paid small amounts of money via Paypal. Pays in GBP so if your currency is USD you get to take advantage of that increase in value. Polls are spotty but worth it due to the instant payout (so no minimum or anything like that). iOS and Android.

52. PollPass - $5.15

Answer polls and get paid! Pays via PayPal at $5. Very simple and fun to use. Just answer the polls whenever they are available and watch the points add up. Added this at the end of the year so hope to expand on this next year.

53. Brand Insights Polling - $5

I honestly have no clue how I got paid by them. I think I took a survey that I found from a Facebook ad or something?

54. CashForApps - $5

Get paid to download apps! They don’t pay the best and sometimes have a hard time crediting but still might be worth a shot. The very best paying apps pay around 30 cents. Some pay pennies. Available on iOS and Android. You can use my invite code “4848a6” and get a few free points.

55. EarnWallet - $5

This was a from a promotion that was posted on beermoney for just downloading EarnWallet. Check out the sub for opportunities for occasional promotional opportunities like this.

56. Shopkick - $5

Scan items, check into stores, and earn cash back for buying certain items. Not a huge earner but can be fun to mess around with when you’re out shopping. Available on iOS and Android.

57. Louder Rewards - $5

This app paid $5 Amazon to download 5 apps and use them for 3 minutes. It was a one time offer so I don’t use it anymore. It’s on iOS and Android.

58. Qmee - $4.68

Install their extension and get paid a few cents for random searches that you make. They also have surveys. I use PayPal to cash out and there aren’t any minimums that that’s cool!

59. Google Opinion Rewards - $4.68

This app sends you occasional very short surveys from Google that pay 10-20 cents. Using Google services and being mobile seems to increase the number of surveys that you get. Some people get a lot, some get less. Worth just having on your phone. The iOS app pays via PayPal and the Android app just give you Google Play credits.

60. College Pulse - $5

This app has polls for college students to take. I think you need a .edu email address? Their rewards kinda suck so I stopped using it but they had an offer to cashout for $5 bitcoin to the Ben bitcoin wallet so I did that. Maybe worth it depending on what reward options they have at the time. Android and iOS.

61. Fetch Ref Code For $2-$5 Bonus: XE2XG - $3

Scan receipts and get paid. I get 2.5 cents per receipt on average. They also have products that you can get rebates on when you buy (sorta like iBotta). They only accept grocery store receipts. A good addition to your receipt scanning routine.

62. Quick Survey - $1.61

See my section on iMoney. Very similar but with less apps available and larger fees.

63. CoinOut - $1.02

This is one of the most straight forward receipt scanning apps. It pays 1-5 cents a receipt (typically 2 cents). Cash out starts at $1 for Amazon or PayPal which is way lower than most receipt apps. Very nice. Hope to earn more with this next year. Has both Android and iOS apps.

64. Indeed Job Spotter - $1

This app pays you $0.50 per sign to submit help wanted signs that you find around your city. I have never actually submitted a sign but got paid $0.10 per sign to verify the validity of other people’s signs. I’ve seen people make pretty decent money on here.

65. 1Q - $0.25

This one seemed cool at first. Take short polls, get paid $0.25 instantly via PayPal. The problem is that I never get polls anymore. Others have had the same experience. You might be able to squeak a few cents out of it. Android and iOS.

TOTAL: $3014.92

Hope this helps you guys out, and if you have any questions let me know! Let me know what I should add to my routine :). Thanks to everyone who contributes to this subreddit because I found many of these programs thanks to you! Have a great 2019!
submitted by Goldeneye0242 to beermoney [link] [comments]

03-04 21:25 - 'Building Ergo: UTXO vs Account' (self.Bitcoin) by /u/eleanorcwhite removed from /r/Bitcoin within 10-20min

'''
Ergo takes the most secure and best-established features of Bitcoin and implements advanced new cryptographic features on its rock-solid foundations. This series explores the choices we have made in creating Ergo, with the first article unpacking the advantages of the UTXO model.
When you’re dealing with financial value, you cannot afford to take chances. Every architecture decision in a cryptocurrency platform has implications. While there are different ways to solve the same problem, some solutions are better tested and more reliable than others.
Like Bitcoin, Ergo uses the ‘UTXO’ (unspent transaction outputs) model, rather than the Account model used by platforms like Ethereum. There are a number of reasons why we have made this choice, but first it’s worth explaining a little about how the UTXO or ‘Box’ model works.
Most people think that the balance of an account is a simple number that is updated when you send or receive funds. This is the obvious way to approach the problem; after all, it is effectively how money works in the real world. Your bank account has a balance that is increased or decreased when different transfers are made in and out. This is how the ‘Account’ model operates: your balance on the blockchain is altered by transactions to and from the account.
How much dough?
The UTXO model, pioneered by Bitcoin, is quite different. You can think of this a bit like a person holding a series of lumps of bread dough. Their balance is the sum of these lumps, or UTXOs. Lumps can be divided or combined, before they are sent to a new address, but you always know where they came from. For example:
Alice has 100g of bread dough (100 ERG). She breaks off a lump of 75g and gives it to Bob, keeping 25g of ‘change’ for herself. Charlie has 250g of dough. He breaks off 150g and gives it to Bob, keeping 100g of change for himself. Bob breaks 20g of dough off the 150g lump he received from Charlie, and combines the resulting 130g with the 75g he received from Alice. He gives the total of 205g to Dave, keeping the 20g change for himself. Dave now has 205g of bread dough, which used to belong to Charlie. Before Charlie owned it, 75g used to belong to Alice, while 130g used to belong to Bob.
In the UTXO model, ‘lumps’ of coins can be combined and divided, but unlike bread dough, they aren’t mixed together. You can follow the history of funds right back to the coinbase transaction in which those coins were first mined. That’s very different to the Account model, where the balance of each account is simply changed. (You can, of course, check the blockchain to make sure the Account says what it should, but that’s not intrinsically necessary like it is with the UTXO approach.)
Why UTXO?
The UXTO model has several implications. For a start, each object is immutable – lumps of coins cannot be ‘edited’ like an Account balance is edited when a transaction is made. The balance is calculated from the transaction history, right back to the point those coins first came into existence.
That makes security much simpler, because either a UTXO exists in the form you are expecting, or it does not exist at all. With the account model, you need to carefully check that the account you’re dealing with is in the state it should be (and developers typically don’t do that properly). This also makes UTXOs more friendly for offchain protocols, like sidechains and the Lightning Network.
Accounts make it easier to store the ‘state’, but easy doesn’t always mean better. With Ergo’s extended UTXO model, state transitions are more explicit and so they are cleaner – there are no unwanted surprises. It might be a little bit more burdensome to deal with, but it’s a lot better and more straightforward in terms of security.
'''
Building Ergo: UTXO vs Account
Go1dfish undelete link
unreddit undelete link
Author: eleanorcwhite
submitted by removalbot to removalbot [link] [comments]

Lessons learned - Crypto and Divorce - In January I was a millionaire thanks to BTC, then my wife divorces me and now I have $30,000 AMA

Crossreferencing u/nanoissuperior He wrote earlier today: https://www.reddit.com/CryptoCurrency/comments/a3n6uw/in_january_i_was_a_millionaire_thanks_to_nano_now/
Title: In January I was a millionaire thanks to Nano, now I have $25,000 AMA

I was replying to his post, but my reply ended up being a bit too large as a reply and steered off-topic, albeit an interesting one. So I decided to make it its own post, because there may be a good lessons to be learned and hoping some will come forward with good information to be shared.
I hope it can help anyone on this sub avoid the costly mistakes that I made. Here it goes: FLAIR: LEGAL (not in the list)
----
u/nanoissuperior are you who I think you are? I won't give out any further identifying clues, but I happen to know someone in the exact same position that could have written that exact same headline. If you read the first paragraph, you'll know if you know me.
The person I know bought Nano really early, based on a tip from a friend. I got in much later. By the time he told me it had already spiked to the $5 range, when I ended up buying. I then sold in the $20's so it was a good buy nonetheless. We were former colleagues at a large, large software company somewhere in the PNW, I left the company to venture out on my own and try to launch some projects I had in mind and relocated overseas for a few years. We lost contact with each other during my time away, but we connected again during the market runup and started exchanging coin information on a daily basis during the big bull run of late 2017. That was a crazy time.... the market trend was a few degrees short of vertical for pretty much all coins!

Hey, guess what? Now that I think about it, I could have written that same headline myself! In January 2018 I was a Millionaire too! Not with Nano, but thanks to purchasing a good chunk of Bitcoin in 2011 at $1.20 each. I ended up a single digit millionaire with what I had left in Bitcoin around January of 2018.
And, just like you, today, from all that wealth, I have about $30.000 left, with little to show for. Can we call that even? Although my disaster was not caused entirely by market fluctuation; Mine is a more complex story and I am going to mention it, because hopefully, it could serve as a lesson to be learned for any crypto holder out there, so they don't make the make mistake I made: Don't trust anyone. Always be skeptical and watch out for your own interests. Anyhow, here it goes:
After 5 years overseas, I had enough and wanted to come back to the States. My wife stated her preference to stay abroad, but eventually, she conceded albeit reluctantly. We chose a small town in CO to settle, and landed in November of 2017. We had plans to settle down and considered purchasing a home with my/our new fortune, based on the market price during that period. At the same time, I was also hesitant about the inherent tax payments due caused by such large liquidation. I was trying to have to pay taxes as far away as possible. So, I decided to wait till New Year's Eve and started liquidating my crypto on January 1st, 2018 right after midnight. This way, I would have 16 months (till April, 2019) to pay any capital gains taxes, and I was confident at the time that the market would give me that for free, especially at the pace that it was going. I have been an early adopter and have since then acquired the high levels of verification and trading limits per week, with many exchanges, but for a large sum like this, I needed several separate transactions, over the course of several weeks, especially wanting to do it with a US-based exchange that was linked to a US bank accounts, to avoid overseas wire transfers, meaning more fees. (Yes, I did look at all OTC options, but for reasons not relevant to the story, I couldn't make it happen, so I had to use the traditional Exchange channels for asset liquidation).
My wife and I, initially had some fundamental disagreements on the gross amount to be spent and the type of property we should be purchasing. I wanted a smaller place, with a denser, younger community, where there'd be kids our son's age for him to play. She insisted that we should go big; we had been traveling for so many years, and we had not been able to call any of our past residences our home. It was time to settle and nest; She convinced me that we should own a property of our own that we would be proud of living in for years. One that we could own outright and would not easily outgrow. We ended up splurging and purchased in cash two luxury cars for ourselves and set our sights on a large dream house in the city's Golf & Country Club, free and clear, for us and our two kids. I don't even play golf, nor do I even like it, but, if it makes her happy and it is within the safe margins of making it happen, I figured, why not? My concerns were largely financial and the numbers were adding up. It was a bit tight against my personal safe margins, but, at the same time, I was imagining to never have to make, or even have to think about, a car or home mortgage payment ever again! Bitcoin is on a roll and there is no sign of it stopping. Fine. Let's do it, before I change my mind.
Now, I admit I was extremely lucky with choosing the time of when to sell the assets. I had no clue the market would take a dive in February, and so it seemed to many that I had timed the market perfectly, selling most of my coins in the first two weeks of January of 2018. Many called me a genius for selling at the very top, as if I had some sort of wisdom to know when it would drop; the truth is much less flattering; it was nothing but dumb luck, based on me wanting to pay taxes in 2018 and defer to 2019. Awesome, well done! Yeah? well, slow down, son, not so fast.
So, I gather the 7-digit lumpsum in January 2018 and we write a check for the full amount at closing in February on the property of her dreams. A property that could easily be showcased on a luxury Real Estate magazine cover. Also, remember we had just moved back to the United States with just a few suitcases each from overseas. We had no furniture, kitchenware, curtains, TV's, bed sheets, winter clothing and so many other essential things that one usually purchases over time, but which we now had to purchase all at once. Not a problem, Bitcoin had dropped slightly but still well above $15k, I believe, at the time. And, earlier, in January, I had diligently taken this expense into account and effortlessly set aside a small fortune for equipping such a large house with everything we would ever need, brand new. It seemed we were protagonists of one of the Home Makeover Shows.
Finally, after working day and night, prepping the house non-stop for days and when every piece of furniture had finally arrived, been unpacked and carried to its corresponding room, it seemed most of the essentials were in place and the hard work was done. I longed for pouring myself a Scotch and to finally sit down and enjoy the fruits of my labor. I head downstairs to the dedicated walk-in, cigar-humidor / wine / Scotch cellar in the basement and grab the better bottle of Whisky of the few bottles of Scotch that I had bought earlier in the week. On my way up, I remember feeling a sense of calm, combined with a glow of excitement and this undescribable profound inner peace, all at once. This was such a rare, natural, non-drug induced high that I had never experienced. It felt so good! This sense of accomplishment of achieving that one thing I had been chasing and longing for my entire life. I had expected I would be chasing this goal for the next 15-20 years, and yet, here it was. No, where I was, was even better than expected! A place where not even my parents, who still have to make their monthly mortgage payments. I had done it! With a smile from ear to ear, I take a deep breath of relief and while looking around the property, I think to myself: "It's perfect, everything is in place and I can finally call this our home. We are so lucky and we are going to live a great life. A life that few can only dream of. So many concerns will be lifted and become redundant. Everything will be better. I'll start a fire in one of our two fireplaces and I am going to begin enjoying my semi-retired life with the first sip of my drink. That will be the official start of our new life".
I head over to the kitchen to get a glass and some ice cubes, while I struggle to find which one is the freezer among the many drawers in the kitchen. It was then when I notice a handwritten note placed front and center on the kitchen counter. It is from my wife and read: "There is no easy way to say this, so I am just going to say it..... I want to legally divorce [ ...]". It continued saying that she had taken our son, and had unequivocally decided to leave me. She had already filed the paperwork for divorce and that I should expect to be served in the morning.
My bliss had lasted less than 5 minutes and in less than two seconds, it turned dark, somber and I saw it all crumbling down in front of me. Like a long-awaited rocket launch, years in preparation, which then unexpectedly explodes on the launch pad during the countdown. My stomach, heart and everything in my body just sank and melted into one ball of poison in my core. I felt like throwing up. I was completely blindsided; she had played the game all along, not giving me the slightest hint of what was being concocted in the background. She had already engaged with her lawyers weeks beforehand. Her mother was already in town from another state to help out with I don't know what. I had been gaslighted and was threatened by her that I needed to see a psychiatrist due to a change in my temper that I had supposedly developed - my temper was awesome: with BTC at that price? Everything was perfect! But I obeyed and went anyhow (this would later fit her story that she had to leave with the child because she feared for her safety due to my supposed temper for which I was under treatment, therefore, I must have this temper problem, see?). Also, the purchase of the overpriced home also seemed clearly premeditated: Price was the main driver of the decision making; not location, demographics, taxes, etc. It was the wrong neighborhood for us (people much older than us, retired, golfers and no kids the same age as our son to play with). Our house happened to also be the most expensive in the neighborhood. I can see it all so clearly now.
See, your crypto coins on the blockchain, are not within the US court's jurisdiction (or, at least, it's quite debatable - a gray area - ask me for the seed and I can tell you that I may have the seed, or that I may not have the seed, I may have the wrong seed, I may have forgotten it, I may have lost it - you can't prove I did not forget, or lost it, etc). However, once it is in FIAT in a bank, or invested in a property, the courts can rule on the asset(s), freeze, disburse or order a sale of the property, etc. It's done all the time.
Also, the coins were technically mine, and by definition private property (not to be divided during the divorce) as they were acquired before the marriage. I could not prove its origins (I bought many of them via direct messaging members on Bitcointalk.org and mining rather than exchanges, so no records, receipts or nothing to prove otherwise: the big exchanges like BitStamp and Coinbase didn't start operations till 2013, if I m not mistaken. Instead, I would talk to one of the forum members offering coins we'd agree on a price, I'd send a check to wherever the individual seller instructed me to (Russia, Bulgaria, Japan, UK. etc) and the coins would be deposited to whatever address I provided. Yes, it was quite crude at the time.
However, once I converted my coins to cash and used that cash to buy a property for the benefit of the family, it became common property and thus she then had rights to a portion of it when divided between the two parties should a divorce occur - which ended up being almost 3/4 of all assets.
I was robbed in broad daylight. By the one person, I trusted with my life. The one you should trust with your life. Your life partner. And while I was in complete denial, trying to bargain, I waited too long to obtain good legal representation. When I finally ended up getting a lawyer, I was quite distraught and I clearly did not do the proper research and this resulted in a less than stellar performance and detrimental to me at many key steps in the process. I had to switch legal representation right before mediation and I can't blame my new lawyer either, as (s)he did not have the required time to catch up on all the details, (s)he did his/her best, but I was ultimately strongarmed into conceding my soon-to-be-ex-wife to let her return to the house, in exchange to obtain 50% of my son's custody, with serious and strict clauses I had to abide by. So, I had to move out, find a hole in the wall in a student apartment, pay my rent and pay our kids pre-school, while she lives grandiose, without monthly payments in the country club, till the house sells, which will likely be in the spring of next year. Nice!
Due to my delay, legal mishandling and somehow every other element in her favor, she inexplicably ended up with around 3/4 of the worth of all assets, free and clear, no taxes due. Mind you, she has never financially contributed, nor made a single $ during our entire marriage. She has never worked and had $0 in her pocket when we married. She didn't even have a checking account, well in her thirties. She is no dummy; she is street smart, knows how to manipulate people, get her way with flirting and charm, while I am more intellectual and book smart. and She beat me hands-down. She is walking away with a sum of, not quite 7 figures, but close.
With what I am left with from the sale of the house, I am responsible to pay for all the capital gains taxes from the liquidation to the IRS, which are due in April 2019. I don't expect there to be more left over than the estimated $30k mentioned above.
Hate the market all you want, I made peace with the market and am keeping busy at hating my ex for a while for putting me in the same situation. She tripped me 1 yard before the finish line and pushed me in the prickly bushes, to cross it by herself. Go figure. When I am done hating her, I'll get back to rebuilding my life again from scratch. I am not worried, I have done it before. Just pissed, I was so close and that I was so naive to not see it coming.
Sorry, I am not meaning to hijack the thread, just wanted you to know that others may have lost more than just "free" money; money we didn't really have to work for. We were the lucky ones. It is what I keep telling myself to stop me from jumping off a bridge.
PS - Woah: Sorry for the wall of text; I was just going to write the first paragraph and ended up venting about my current situation. I know, I should take this issue to /depressed, /exes or /whereisthenearestbridgeIcanjumpfrom.
Hopefully, this can be a lesson to those holding crypto and some can learn what NOT to do. I learned the hard way and was left with nothing. Don't be a nice guy. Don't trust anyone with your crypto. Anyhow, I am sure either our vigilant subreddit bot, or one of the mods will remove my post for not adhering to rule, and if not, I am sure that you fine people will downvote me to hell. Go ahead. Take away from me the little Karma I left too! Thanks!

I learned many lessons, but here are some key ones [IANAL - any crypto-educated AL opinion appreciated here, thanks] :
- Understand the concept of private property - property you acquire before getting married. INAL - this depends on the state legislation, but it is hard to prove with crypto, especially if you obtained your crypto through foreign exchanges, outside of legal jurisdictions, the petitioner might not understand or willing to invest in obtaining subpoenas and requests to businesses operating overseas, as this may result costly.
- Get a lawyer who understands, or is willing to understand crypto, its benefits of being somewhat unreachable and how that can work for you. Don't let them shortchange you with: "well, let's just convert the rest to cash, because that I understand" type of reasoning.
- If you do go to mediation, the above applies as well. This arbitrator or mediator needs to be one that understands the intrinsic details of crypto - for example, during the ATH, I bought 6 digits worth in $USD of Stellar. I used the very first version of the software, supporting Stellar on my hardware device, and put it all in a cold storage wallet somewhere around January. I routinely checked on my coins on the blockchain and they are there. A few months later, I try to access my account and the device returns a different public address, which contains 0 funds. I am still trying to debug this issue with the manufacturer, but the fact is that I was accused of hiding these coins or negligence and was demanded that I paid half of what was lost. or not lost, out of my pocket for money that I didn't have access either. I tried to explain it in the simplest terms, there are risks involved with using first come software. There is no 1800 number, mo tech support. no CEO, no, you can't call the BBB and complain, etc and no one seemed to be able to understand, nor willing to either. It became a huge roadblock for which I had to concede, not cash, but a concession, I was not wanting to concede. The petitioner leaned on the fact that I was either wilfully cheating or stupid enough to lose the coins and managed to create enough doubt in my character and integrity and there was nothing rational I could explain that she, or anyone else in the room would understand. Perhaps mutually contracting a seasoned crypto expert that can offer a neutral view and give his/her opinion might be worth considering. Andreas, where were you when I needed you? :)
- Other examples were some coins I had bought in 2012 and gifted to some of her family's kids. I was holding these, till they would turn 16 for them to pay themselves their college, or so I told them. These coins were demanded back by the petitioner. Ok, I suggested that I would send them, but with a CHECKLOCKTIMEVERIFY value with a block height of let's say,10 years from now, out of fear that she would spend the coins and the kids would never know (they are toddlers). No one understood what I was talking about, I was made out the crazy one, I gave up, sent her the coins, unlocked and, just as I expected, within 20 minutes of receiving them, she spent $1200 worth of it (for a flight, I think). If you are the only one speaking your language, no one is willing to listen or make an effort to understand you.
- It appears my coins were private property, which means, that I acquired them before the marriage and in case of divorce, if I have not moved them or used them for the common good of the marriage, then they remain mine. However, I liquidated them and cash ended up in my checking account to be used to buy groceries, cars and eventually a house, and it is then that they became common property. Only once they landed in my checking account on which she is named on. It appears that had I taken proper legal precautions with documentation, or a company/trust, where that money would have gone, instead of my checking accounts, elsewhere, I would have still been able to be the legal proprietor of the resulting cash. I can't quite remember the details, but it as something that was explained to me afterward, and I honestly think I just tuned it out, because it made me sick to know I could have held on to my wealth. Perhaps a lawyer can chime in? Again, much of the lack of information and every misstep taken was because of dealing with people that are accustomed to traditional assets and will not deviate from it. Crypto is different and is treated differently. It is so important to know the strengths and weaknesses when going into litigation about something that people don't understand.
- Some more I can think of, but this post is getting way out of hand in size. Feel free to comment/suggest your own and I'll add more to the comments.

Credits to: u/nanoissuperior Thanks for your post, it inspired me to write this one. Anyone, any karma you feels needs to go his way, for providing the source of inspiration, please give to O-OP.

TL;DR: Wife, having contributed $0 during entire marriage, waited until I cashed out all my crypto at the top of the bull market in January 2018, for a nice seven-figure amount, and then immediately divorced me for the money.

Edit: added TL;DR
submitted by mijalis to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Developer Successfully Hacks Bitcoin Wallet to Win a Contest Coinbase - How to Find your Bitcoin wallet address How To Invest In Bitcoin With The Coinbase Platform 2020 Coinbase – How to find your Bitcoin Wallet address 2020! How to verify coinbase account  How to create bitcoin wallet address in nepal

Use exchanging platforms to convert BTC to XMR. I personally use Morphtoken*** for this process, you simply fill in the amount, the recipient address (you XMR address) and the return/refund address (your BTC address, this is incase you fill in an invalid XMR address or something went wrong during the transaction). MARKET DATA TERMS OF USE. Please carefully read the entirety of these Terms. By accessing or using Coinbase Pro Market Data, you agree to be bound by these Terms, including all amendments and updates made between your initial acceptance of these Terms and any future access or use. Coinbase is a secure platform that makes it easy to buy, sell, and store cryptocurrency like Bitcoin, Ethereum, and more. Based in the USA, Coinbase is available in over 30 countries worldwide. A Bitcoin address, or simply address, is an identifier of 26-35 alphanumeric characters, beginning with the number 1, 3 or bc1 that represents a possible destination for a bitcoin payment. Addresses can be generated at no cost by any user of Bitcoin. For example, using Bitcoin Core, one can click "New Address" and be assigned an address.It is also possible to get a Bitcoin address using an The illustration above shows a simplified version of a block chain. A block of one or more new transactions is collected into the transaction data part of a block. Copies of each transaction are hashed, and the hashes are then paired, hashed, paired again, and hashed again until a single hash remains, the merkle root of a merkle tree.. The merkle root is stored in the block header.

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Developer Successfully Hacks Bitcoin Wallet to Win a Contest

NEW CHANNEL: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCH9HlTrjyLmLRS0iE1P4rrg ----- Rich Dad Poor Dad: https://amzn.to/3cKJ4Ia C... Bitcoin and Lightning Network project developer, John Cantrell, explained how he was able to successfully hack a BTC address by checking around a trillion seed combinations over the course of 30 ... If you want to someone to send you money to your Bitcoin account, Give them this address. you may donate to our network via Bitcoin as well :) Bitcoin address ... How to Create Coinbase Bitcoin Wallet Address 2020 - Duration: 8:18. Mike J Anthony 101 views. 8:18. Coinbase Mobile App Tutorial -- Beginners - Duration: 14:23. Inda Black 12,062 views. Coinbase - How to Find your Bitcoin wallet address For Business Inquiries:- [email protected] ...

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